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Pres

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About Pres

  • Rank
    Retired Art Teacher
  • Birthday 08/20/1949

Contact Methods

  • MSN
    bisquefire06@hotmail.com
  • Website URL
    http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/

Profile Information

  • Location
    Central, PA
  • Interests
    Camping, kayaking, family, travel, Art in general. I have a small studio in my garage. Two electric kilns, two wheels, wedging table etc. I am primarily interested in cone 6 Ox. but like to see what is going on at all ranges. Read about ceramics voraciously and love the feel of the clay and throwing. Have to admit that my greatest joy is in the making, not the glazing. That said I do mix my own glazes, some of my own formulas, some borrowed. Retired from teaching art, in 2009 after 36 years, taught ceramics 34 of those years.

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  1. Technology for art and craft Ceramics may be defined as any practical evolutionary or revolutionary advancement of knowledge within a ceramic process that allows a more efficient method for traditional practices with the aid of a system, technique, tool or piece of equipment. I would not want to leave out the artists, that do decorative work or the sculptors etc. thus putting in the art and craft. I bow to your editing skills, as you have taken a longer statement and boiled it down to a much more precise statement. . . . thank you. How do those of you in the community feel about th
  2. Much of what we have today is evolutionary, yet once in a while something comes about out of the blue that is revolutionary. To say that one is higher tech as compared to the other seems to be irrelevant especially when you consider that the revolutionary had assists from the evolutionary, and the evolutionary has a distant ancestor that was revolutionary. Duh.. . . think I got all of that right, but now my head hurts> Technology for Ceramics may be defined as any practical advancement of knowledge within a ceramic process that will allow a cost effective, easier or quicker, way o
  3. @Callie Beller DieselThe problem of low tech vs high tech is that it also has a history component that makes defining technology difficult. There are some who would say stick turned wheels are low tech as compared to today. but then they are a big improvement over the cave wheels of egyptian use. To try to rate and configure this would be a monumental direction. If someone could come up with a statement for it, then please present one . I really can't figure a way to define it in a few sentences. My best effort would probably be several paragraphs. best, Pres
  4. Technology for Ceramics may be defined as any practical advancement of knowledge within a ceramic process that will allow a cost effective, easier or quicker, way of doing traditional practices with the aid of a new system, tool or piece of equipment. This could be some form of evolutionary technology building on traditional methods and equipment or completely new technology. @Min I tried to include wifi under new system. . . understanding that there are a lot of different definitions out there as to old and new and types of tools. @HulkGood thoughts, I understand that potters are i
  5. As I understand it, glaze in the melt has surface tension (kind of a barrier surface). If the oxide/wash is not absorbed partway into the glaze when applied, a few things could happen. .. .metallic surface, shivering of the oxide surface with sharp edges, or metallic oxides running over the glaze surface. best, Pres
  6. Technology for Ceramics may be defined as any practical advancement of knowledge within a ceramic process that will allow a cost effective, easier or quicker, way of doing traditional processes with the aid of a new tool or piece of equipment. This could be some form of evolutionary technology building on traditional methods and equipment or completely new technology. Taking some thoughts from @Bill Kielb, and adding a few into the first definition above. . . . . any better? best, Pres
  7. I think it would be a good idea to come to some consensus on the meaning of "technology" I would propose that we collaboratively write a statement of what "technology" means to us in the Ceramic community, or at least in the ICAN Community Forum. As a starter I will present what it means to me. Technology for me as involved in ceramics is basically anything that makes my life easier when working with clay. This could include anything that makes my life easier, that I may have had another way of doing, but something technologically innovative would be helpful. for Example: when
  8. Thanks @Min, I will try to post the question as an ongoing updating definition editable statement. Thanks for the 2fer. Finding a topic is tough at times. best, Pres
  9. @Min, I really like this suggestion, and will post if after posting the question included in the suggestion, ,, , What do you define as technology when thinking of things Ceramic? Hope this meets your approval, as I believe it is essential to find a definition that most would approve of. best, Pres
  10. I usually order a ton at a time, and leave it setting on a wooden rack outside under the kayaks. Tarp over the whole thing. The boxes do not dry too quickly, even at the end of 2 years. Freezes in the Winter, thaws in the Spring. If doing any pottery in the Winter, very infrequent, I leave a box or two in the shop heated to just above freezing for 12 hrs, and it is fine. As for wedging, I wedge all the time, but do as Marcia says to slam the clay on sides to "wake it up". best, Pres
  11. Congratulations to Marcia Selsor for her 2021 ICAN Wall Calendar contest win for October! Kudos Marcia, well done! best, Pres
  12. Remembering back in the day at PSU or at MSU in PA, the open studio policy would almost allow anything to disappear. I don't remember hearing of any leaving the studio, but there were several that would be scarfed away from the regular areas to grad student private studios in the building. At the same time, I can remember when I was practicing pulling handles on an Easter vacation. Climbed into a second floor window from the roof of my old Dodge Dart pulled handles for 3-3 hours, and stuck them to everything imaginable. . . . large sinks, table edges, lockers etc. Should have cleaned up,
  13. These are based on empirical formulas, , and are considered washes. They should have water added to match the consistency of you needs When I mix them up, I use use grams, and end up with around 750 grams in most cases, using the second column not the third. best, Pres
  14. Van Gilder posted a series of washes a while back that you might find of interest. Of course testing would be recommended. Wash Cone 6-10 Material Empirical 5 10 OM-4 25 125 250 Nepheline Syenite 25 125 250 Blue Red Iron Oxide 25 125 250 Cobalt
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