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Grinding The Bottom Of Your Pots


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#21 bciskepottery

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Posted 09 November 2013 - 08:16 PM

 

I use 3M diapads to finish the bottoms of pots . . . here is one sourcehttp://www.toolocity...shing-pads.aspx (It looks like they are out of some grit blocks now) 
 
Basically, a version of "wax on, wax off".  I dip the sanding blocks in water and polish away.  I recommend 100 and 200 grit blocks for most items, although I do have a couple of 400 grit for making a surface really smooth.  I use these on Highwater's Little Loafers and Red Rock, Standard 266, 306, and 381, and Laguna Dark Brown and Soldate 60.  Those run the gamut from smooth clay to groggy clay.  Do not recommend using them for dry sanding; too much dust.  And, they clean up bisque really nice, too.

Ty for the link super fast shipping
They work amazingly well, much better than any of the sandpaper/pads I've tried.
Lowest I got was 100, wish I would have gotten one more coarse
Pads are much stiffer than I expected.
I've only had them for a day, are you getting good life span on yours? Have you had issue with them getting clogged?
the bottoms get super smooth, so no scratching the good furniture
They work so well that they create somewhat of a knife edge with the newly smoothed bottom, but easily remedied with same pad.

 

 

I have a 50 grit I use for really rough stuff . . . but I also try to minimize the amount of post-firing clean-up by making clean, compressed bottoms.  Mostly I use the pads to remove any kiln wash that sticks to bottoms and feet, and to smooth a rough surface where -- even after ribbing the bottom when done -- some grit comes to the surface after glaze firing.  Yes, the blocks are stiff . . . I use them whole (as is) and I also cut them into quarters -- the edges seem to wear out faster than the middles on my work.  They can get clogged . . . when that happens I usually wash them out in water. 

 

As far as life-span, that depends on how much clean up is needed.  I've used some for a months, others wear quicker if the surfaces are rougher.  I usually buy a half-dozen or so at a time, so a fresh one is always handy. 

 

For glaze drips, I use my dremel with a grinding bit.  The diamond pad can, however, be used to polish up the surface after the dremel does its thing. 



#22 docweathers

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Posted 09 November 2013 - 08:32 PM

I didn't realize how great my own $20 el cheapo bottom grinder ( described above) was until I looked at the horizontal jewelers grinders at $2-$3000.


Larry

Lawrence Weathers

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#23 JBaymore

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Posted 10 November 2013 - 12:33 AM

Norm,

 

I've had my eyes on a lap wheel for a long while.  Just haven't been able to pull the trigger on the price yet.

 

I do have a slow speed wet bath grinder ...... but the lap wheel is the perfect tool.  Sigh...........

 

best,

 

........................john


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#24 Min

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Posted 10 November 2013 - 11:19 AM

Diamond flat lap on wheel head with a clay pancake works. Some of the flat laps are very thin peel and stick type, the one I have has an aluminum backplate, about 1/4" thick, 120 grit, need to keep it wet while using. 

 

http://www.ebay.com/...nc&LH_PrefLoc=1



#25 jrgpots

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Posted 10 November 2013 - 11:40 AM

Diamond flat lap on wheel head with a clay pancake works. Some of the flat laps are very thin peel and stick type, the one I have has an aluminum backplate, about 1/4" thick, 120 grit, need to keep it wet while using. 
 
http://www.ebay.com/...nc&LH_PrefLoc=1


Great idea




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