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Oxide washes on top of glazes! Oh my!


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I post this as sort of a "public service" to other pottery semi-newbies like myself.  I somehow never got the message that you can easily paint oxide (and mason stain) washes on top of glazes for a lot of added color or design.  The videos below brought this to my attention and I am really excited about the results.  It has opened up some new avenues for me.  I defer to Richard McColl for a full description but it could not be easier:

Just add some oxides (or mason stains), a little water, and maybe some gerstley borate as a flux -- and apply ON TOP of your glaze for great color and effects.  Goes on great with a brush.  Make it the consistency of ink.  Hard to screw up.

Some examples are at the bottom and here are the videos:

 

 

 

color 1.jpg

color 2.jpg

color 3.jpg

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On 3/23/2021 at 2:49 AM, Rick Wise said:

I post this as sort of a "public service" to other pottery semi-newbies like myself.  I somehow never got the message that you can easily paint oxide (and mason stain) washes on top of glazes for a lot of added color or design.  The videos below brought this to my attention and I am really excited about the results.  It has opened up some new avenues for me.  I defer to Richard McColl for a full description but it could not be easier:

Just add some oxides (or mason stains), a little water, and maybe some gerstley borate as a flux -- and apply ON TOP of your glaze for great color and effects.  Goes on great with a brush.  Make it the consistency of ink.  Hard to screw up.

Some examples are at the bottom and here are the videos:

 

 

 

color 1.jpg

color 2.jpg

color 3.jpg

 Check out Greg Daly, Linda Arbuckle, John Britt and a few others.

Majolica work.

On glaze decorators.

The glaze itself can alter greatly your results.

Initially put your washes on top third of

your vertical surfaces..runming glazes not much fun on shelves of kiln.

Lots of fun ahead!!

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since you posted this for potters new to the process and english is an imprecise language, may i point out that the oxides are used on top BEFORE the glaze is fired.   believe me, we have had some questions over the years that indicate a complete lack of knowledge of any language.

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16 hours ago, oldlady said:

since you posted this for potters new to the process and english is an imprecise language, may i point out that the oxides are used on top BEFORE the glaze is fired.   believe me, we have had some questions over the years that indicate a complete lack of knowledge of any language.

Good point Oldlady.  Effective communication is HARD!

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  • 4 weeks later...

So I really enjoy using washes and have seen lots of videos referring to them.  I also watched the YouTube videos at the top of the post but still have questions. If anyone could point me to recipes for these washes, I’d be grateful.  I have Zinc Oxide, Cobalt, red iron,  and chrome in dry form that I inherited.  How can I turn these into a wash that might be similar to what a company like Mayco  calls a Stoneware Wash?  I searched this site’s recipes but maybe I’m calling it the wrong thing? I’ve attached a photo of a bowl that I used Mayco SW301 Iron Wash on the exterior.  I’m hoping I can make it myself.

 

TIA,

Missy

652C10F1-7D7A-44AE-A977-9B38CDCFCEB1.jpeg

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A plethora of oxide wash recipes from June Perry here. She fires cone 10 but changing the feldspar to either gerstley borate or a boron frit like 3134 would be a place to start testing them at cone 6. I wouldn't recommend any of the ones using barium.

@Missy, I've use 30 Red Iron Oxide + 30 Blackbird  (an iron plus manganese clay) + 30 Alberta Slip + 10 Rutile at cone 6 for a similar colour as in your image.

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18 hours ago, Callie Beller Diesel said:

@Missy just as a heads up, zinc oxide is used as a flux. The other oxides you’ve listed are colourants. 

Awesome!  I got many pounds of Zinc oxide and was going to try it as a wash.     Thanks for the heads up.  Saving me from myself can be a full time job!

 

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17 hours ago, Min said:

A plethora of oxide wash recipes from June Perry here. She fires cone 10 but changing the feldspar to either gerstley borate or a boron frit like 3134 would be a place to start testing them at cone 6. I wouldn't recommend any of the ones using barium.

@Missy, I've use 30 Red Iron Oxide + 30 Blackbird  (an iron plus manganese clay) + 30 Alberta Slip + 10 Rutile at cone 6 for a similar colour as in your image.

Oh thank you!!  This was exactly what I was looking for!

 

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  • 1 month later...
28 minutes ago, Callie Beller Diesel said:

@rox54 Some things like iron will flux enough by themselves, but other colourants are more refractory and won’t stick without adding a little flux.

Is gertsley more important when putting the colorant on top of a glaze? I've used it alone as a wash on greenware, bisqued, then clear glazed and that seems ok so far.

In the video, he is putting the colourants on plates, so I assume he would have to test for food safety.

Edited by rox54
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