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Babs

Score And Slip Or Slip And Score?

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Babs    386

After watching a potter making some assemble pots, I noticed that the joining was different than how I assembled pieces. This potter slipped then scored whilst I have been scoring then slipping.

Any difference to the join?

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Min    781

I've always scored, slipped then scored again. I give the attached piece a little wiggle while joining, like when the dentist jiggles your cheek when putting the needle in. 

 

edit: I use a slip made with magic water and the claybody I'm working on, 

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bciskepottery    925

I think I do it both ways. Can't remember if it makes a difference.

 

Wonder if there is difference depending on whether you use water/magic water or clay slip? Because water/magic water is more fluid, would you score first, then apply water/magic water on top because the water more easily settles into the scored surface; or vice versa? For slip users, do you score first, then apply slip -- thicker than water -- on top or do you apply the slip and then use the scoring to work it into the clay body?

 

Hmmmmm . . . hopefully a sleepless night does not loom as one ponders slipping/scoring or scoring/slipping.

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Benzine    610

I score then slip, but when I first started teaching, I would say "Slip and Score".  That how my instructors in college said it, despite doing it the same way I did, the same with other Art teachers. 

I finally changed my phrasing, when students asked, why I just didn't say it the other way.  So ever since, I say "Score and Slip".  I still think the former flows off the tongue better, but oh well. 

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Dick White    155

The important things IMO for getting a good join are 1) that the slipped/scored area is well mixed slip and body clay, and 2) the joined part is pressed together completely and tightly to the base part. For point #1, I have found that the slip is not well mixed if it is not scored after the slip is applied. In other words, slip first and then score. However, I have further found that the mixing is even better if it is scored before AND after applying the joining slip. In other words, S3 - "score, slip, and score again". Then place your attachment and press it together well, wiggling it until it stops sliding around. While we are on the subject, I have also found that if I S3 both sides of the join, it will take longer for the piece to stop sliding around and form a solid join, whereas if I S3 only one side of the join while only scoring the other piece, the attachment binds very quickly. Use this behavior to your advantage - if think you will need to adjust the position further a bit as you work with it, then S3 both sides to give yourself some working time and flexibility. Conversely if you need the attachment to stick immediately and you are sure you can hit it on the first try, then S3 only one side. This is what works for me.

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I do a lot of porcelain joins, and prefer using a scoring tool loaded with water to aggressively prepare the soon-to-be-joined areas... I will prepare the areas multiple times when the surrounding areas are on the drier side so as to account for the moisture migrating (especially for multi-part joins). When it comes to stonewares or other forgiving bodies, It's not worth fussing much, glaze will do the dirty work for you! ;)

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Pres    896

I have always scored the pot pieces with a serrated metal rib, or a hack saw blade. However,  a few years ago I started using a stiff brush to apply the slip after scoring and worked the surfaces up even more this way.Before I had put the scoring on then applied slip with soft brush. This seems to work better, but then now I am using magic water also, but I had been using the stiff brush before moving to magic water. Improvement occurred with each change in the process.

 

Ben I used to always say Slip and Score, fell out of my mouth easier.  I always explained that to me it was part of a single process important for completion where scoring always happened before slipping, but not to worry if you did slipping first, just score after and then re-slip.

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Babs    386

I think I do it both ways. Can't remember if it makes a difference.

 

 

I think I do it both ways. Can't remember if it makes a difference.

 

Wonder if there is difference depending on whether you use water/magic water or clay slip? Because water/magic water is more fluid, would you score first, then apply water/magic water on top because the water more easily settles into the scored surface; or vice versa? For slip users, do you score first, then apply slip -- thicker than water -- on top or do you apply the slip and then use the scoring to work it into the clay body?

 

Hmmmmm . . . hopefully a sleepless night does not loom as one ponders slipping/scoring or scoring/slipping.

 

 

YES, at work,trying to seem industrious so that the YR 11 study students find me the role model they need to pursue their studies!

 

AND sometimes these little details can change our world......

I usually do a whole lot of scoring and then slip as I do the join but can see if the clay is quite hard , the slip then score,then slips allows you to attach much drier pieces successfuly.

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Benzine    610

I score, add a little water, then score again. No slip.

NO SLIP?!!! GET HIM!!!

 

I will add, to my initial post, that if a piece is a bit drier than I'd like, I will spray or dab water, score, maybe some more water, then slip.

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GEP    863

I use a wet toothbrush to simultaneously rough up the surface, and work up some gooey slip out of the pot. Two steps in one move. Like others have mentioned above, I then press the parts together firmly with a slight wiggle, until the pieces have "grabbed" each other.

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Joy pots    20

I like the slip & score then score more. I use a metal bent brush scoop up slip on it then score & repeat. Works just fine even if the pieces have become a bit too dry. Then I sponge around the areas for a little more security.

Joy

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timbo_heff    37

Don't use slip either: just vinegar: (or vinegar and a little bit of clay)

I think I learned that vinegar only from a Tim See video maybe (?)

Score, then vinegar, if the clay is really stiff, then I will repeat until there is a nice bit of material. .

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mregecko    18

Score, then slip, then score.

 

First score roughs up the surface, slip sometimes "covers" the rough marks, so I rough it up again with a second scoring. 

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Davidpotter    8

I score, add a little water, then score again. No slip.

for handles on fresh made small pieces i don't slip. just doesn't seem to make a difference.

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Babs    386

I score, add a little water, then score again. No slip.

This would discourage the small shrinkage cracks I sometimes get??

But I guess that you know EXACTLY when to do this ie wetness o fhte leatherhard pieces and join just then!

I'm going to try this might lessen the tidying up of smeared areas.

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neilestrick    1,381

 

I score, add a little water, then score again. No slip.

This would discourage the small shrinkage cracks I sometimes get??

But I guess that you know EXACTLY when to do this ie wetness o fhte leatherhard pieces and join just then!

I'm going to try this might lessen the tidying up of smeared areas.

 

 

It's mostly out of laziness. I just don't want to maintain containers of slip. The wetter the pot and drier the handle, the less cracks you'll have.

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Mark C.    1,800

I keep a tub of slip wipped from my throwing of bowls or larger pots-mix a little vinegar with it now and then . (this is all with porcelain)

Use a metal serated tool for most handle attachments. I score then slip and handle-no eatra water.This is on about 98% of all attachments.I try to make this connection only when the clay is just right mositure wise.

For some reason with teapots I slip then score then slip then attach-maybe I think twice will be better. 

I cover all work one night with loose plastic then dry with plastic off usually pretty fast.

Mark

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Mug    49

I have been trying to slip then score.

It seems when I score first then add the slip I tend to get air trapped making a crapier joint.

I do think like someone said, the moistuer content has a lot to do with making a good joint.

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potterbeth    8

 

 

I score, add a little water, then score again. No slip.

This would discourage the small shrinkage cracks I sometimes get??

But I guess that you know EXACTLY when to do this ie wetness o fhte leatherhard pieces and join just then!

I'm going to try this might lessen the tidying up of smeared areas.

 

 

It's mostly out of laziness. I just don't want to maintain containers of slip. The wetter the pot and drier the handle, the less cracks you'll have.

 

We eliminated slip containers in our teaching studio and went with straight magic water for the same reason...not wanting to maintain containers of slip. As long as the joint is thoroughly scored and slipped then wiggled together well, I don't see much difference with the clay bodies we use. I've seen all the methods mentioned here used in workshops, and I think one of the determining factors is the clay body being used. Some are forgiving and will take less effort, some are more demanding and require more attention. I use a dark brown body which does not do well with water only. I know one porcelain user who eliminated many joining problems by switching to magic water and another who swears by paper clay slip. Magic water recipe: 1 gallon water, 3 TBSP sodium silicate, 1.5 tsp soda ash.

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