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Clay tools for cooking


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Hey! I was wondering if you can use your clean kitchen clay tools for cooking after you have used them for clay. Specifically wondering about a wooden rolling pin...trying to make cookies. Guessing it’s not safe...

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I wouldn't. Once sthing has escasped the drudgery of the kitchen, good policy is to leave it there.

Fill a glass bottle with water, keep it in fridge, use glad bake or sthing baking paper between bottle and cookie dough and great rolling pin...cool pin!!!, good for pastry.

Used a beer bottle for years, long neck, remeber those:-))) had sealer  home brewer,  . Leave stuff in the pottery dept.

 

Edited by Babs
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All of my pottery tools live in the studio. I never take than back and forth.

My warm water teakettle for hot water lives in studio-I have a decaded washing machine outside for clay cloths and towels hooked up to cold water-use no soap ands drains to bamboo patch

I have a huge stack of rolling pins from jumbo wooden to non stick. Since I bought my electric slab roller I have only used one i think for a small fast flat item.

I'm with Babs. leave it in Pottery Dept.

keep in mind I'm not a hobbyist

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I had a guy in my class back in college who attached his handles with spit, and he seems to still be kicking, so there’s that.

I was also raised in the school of thought that cross contamination was pretty likely between your glaze table and other working surfaces, so I think tool transfer isn’t the best idea long term.

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51 minutes ago, Sorcery said:

If you haven't cleaned a cast iron pan with a rib of death, you're missing out. Use the stainless screen too. Keeps the sponge from turning black.

Sorce

Is that a pork rib or a beef rib? I usually use a crock pot for my ribs before putting them on the grill so I don't have to clean the cast iron pan...:D

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19 hours ago, liambesaw said:

Oh darn...  I've been doing it wrong all along!

It just somehow makes its way into every beer I open in the shed.  I think the porcelain fairy comes by when I'm not looking and drops a chunk of reclaim in there :lol:

That's a tooth not a chunk of reclaim...

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Whilst I'm not allowed to take kitchen tools to the workshop, garage, or studio, I wouldn't (otherwise) hesitate to use a clay tool for food prep, given it was thoroughly washed and has a slick/impermeable surface, e.g. finished wood, metal, plastic.

That said, this - "...clay is non-toxic." isn't strictly true Shawnhar. 

From a Princeton University's Health and Environmental Safety page:

"...impurities may include organic matter or sulfur compounds.  Sometimes, ...vermiculite, perlite, and small amounts of minerals such as barium carbonate and metal oxides, are added to modify clay properties. ...adding talcs which themselves can be contaminated with fibrous asbestos or asbestos-like materials.  Geographical sources of talcs are relevant, for example, New York State talcs are notoriously asbestos-contaminated, while Vermont talcs are not."

Some folk may have (or develop) sensitivity to mold and yuck growing in wet clay, as well as some standard ingredients.

Granted, don't eat or breathe it should be sufficient ("should" be, ahem).

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On 2/3/2021 at 11:18 AM, Hulk said:

From a Princeton University's Health and Environmental Safety page:

"...impurities may include organic matter or sulfur compounds.  Sometimes, ...vermiculite, perlite, and small amounts of minerals such as barium carbonate and metal oxides, are added to modify clay properties. ...adding talcs which themselves can be contaminated with fibrous asbestos or asbestos-like materials.  Geographical sources of talcs are relevant, for example, New York State talcs are notoriously asbestos-contaminated, while Vermont talcs are not."

Point taken, but I can't imagine how much cross-contamination it would take to be an issue. If you are actually washing a rolling pin before using it for food prep the amount in your food would probably not even be measurable in a lab setting.

People have been and continue to, eat clay around the world, this has been going on for thousands of years.

https://www.enviromedica.com/wellness/eating-clay-lessons-on-medicine-from-worldwide-cultures/

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Agreed, agreed, agreed. That said, somewhere, folks eat a lot of clay, and some - very few, I'd guess - clays contain some somewhat that is detrimental, and, given, many of those sub cases likely have low amounts of bad stuff; somewhere, few, and not many still leaves some, so may I propose "clay is very safe, no more toxic than any most other dirt - it's dirt - wash it off."

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