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JohnnyK

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Everything posted by JohnnyK

  1. Something that I found works for those pesky jars of totally dried glazes one of those small coffee bean grinders. I picked one up at a thrift store for about $3. I just break the glaze up into small chunks and run them in the grinder for a few seconds and they are very nicely pulverized, just waiting to be reconstituted. You just have to clean the grinder thoroughly after each color so there is no cross-contamination... A potter friend of mine found a commercial Bunn coffee grinder for real cheap which he uses to grind his reclaimed clay to a powder suitable for reconstitution...
  2. I tried one of his schedules that included the 500 degree ramp on my Cress kiln and it shut down on me saying that the 500* exceeded the capability of the kiln, so I reduced it to 350* and it worked. If you look at the fine print in Hulk's image it says that his kiln tried to shut down a couple of times thinking that the 50* was too low...it could have been that the 500* was too high...
  3. No...there is a glossy white glaze on the left side of the ear horn...
  4. Sometimes there's art just for the sake of art...in this image the bottom of the sculpture incorporates a pool of glass and there is some glass in the small bowl on the left...
  5. The smoking is generally caused by a lack of oxygen caused by the narrow neck and the depth that the wax has burned to...
  6. Having spent many years as a photographer working with Photoshop, I can truly say that nothing is as it seems...with that in mind, what about the possibility that these are not made from clay, but may be bowls made from a porous stone like real lava rock? We can reproduce almost anything with clay (does "trompe l'oeil" ring a bell?) but sometimes things actually are what they look like...
  7. You're right about that, Chilly...my mistake...but it would also depend on the wall thickness of the pots since the outward pressure would be pretty even. I, myself, would be willing to try it on a few pieces of my usual production to determine the risk. I wouldn't do it on something special.
  8. You might try the idea of using balloons inflated in the inside of the mugs and bowls if they are deep enough...Inflate them enough so that they stay in place when you pick them up by the stem of the balloon. The balloon will seal the inside right up to the rim...
  9. Hi Courtney and welcome to the forums...Here is a list of most metals and their melting points...You might find something here that will work for you depending on what you want to do. Metal melting points.pdf
  10. I just got the basic electrical stuff done...it will take a little time to make the refinements necessary to seal it up...
  11. Well, I have finally gotten to the point where I have powered my banding wheel design so that it will turn at a very slow speed suitable for use as a spraying turntable. The biggest problem has been getting it to work with a commercially available dimmer switch...it has something to do with the way the motor is wired with the built in capacitor...not all dimmer switches work the same, but, fortunately, I finally found one that works for me. This winter I'll be working on an electro-mechanical system using a microwave turntable motor and pulley system. Now, on another line of thought...there are the old vinyl record turntables...I wonder if a dimmer or potentiometer will slow one of those down to a suitable speed for spraying? Hmmmmm...
  12. Another way to go would be making sure your clay bag doesn't have any holes; put about a cup of water into the bag with your block of clay; put the bag in a 5 gallon or other suitable bucket; add water to the bucket until it is just about an inch above the highest part of the block of clay; close the bag and secure with a twist-tie and let it sit for a day or two, checking the softness of the clay at the end of each day. Placing the bag in a bucket of water compresses the water IN the bag against the clay without air bubbles and provides an even pressure on the inside water to help penetrate the clay. You may have to experiment to determine the right amount of water to put IN the bag each time you use this process...
  13. Something to consider here is the effect that the clay is going to have on the sharpness of the grinding device down the road... You might be well off getting a replacement cutter for grinding meat in the future...
  14. One thing I can say with reference to my recently posted mosaic is that the Amaco Velvet underglazes that I used held pretty true to the colors as printed in the Amaco catalog for the cones they are fired to...in this case ^6...
  15. Welcome to the world of Potter's Choice glazes, Lee! I am currently working on layering with C1, Obsidian as a base glaze with a variety of PC top coats on various pots as well as some jewelry pieces. Photos will follow soon...
  16. What I do is break the dried glaze into smaller chunks and run them through a coffee bean grinder that I picked up at a thrift store for a couple of bucks, dedicated specifically for this purpose. It does a great job and provides a fine powder which is very easy to reconstitute with water to the desired consistency. Remember to unplug and thoroughly clean the grinder after each use to prevent cross-contamination if you go this route...
  17. 83490173_Yardartmosaic.jpg.6f85350235ef7e9e09f308172bfb495c.jpg

    Going to install a neat mosaic in my brick patio this weekend. Pix to follow...

    Here's the installed mosaic...37" diameter.

    1. Denice

      Denice

      Your colors are bright and cheerful yet tie in nicely with the surrounding bricks.  Great job.     Denice

  18. I am in the process of finishing up a mosaic to be installed in a hole in my brick patio (pix to follow soon). The project was a collaboration between me, my wife, Carol, and my mother-in-law, Helen. I cut the backing disk and made the B-Mix5 leaves using cookie cutters, Helen brushed the underglaze on about 170 pieces, and she and Carol glued the pieces down after they were clear-coated and fired to ^6... Then I grouted the piece and prepped the hole for installation which will happen this weekend. We used Amaco Velvet underglazes and came up with some really great results. The colors were striking and pretty true to Amaco's catalog pix. Their palette is pretty extensive and covers much of what you show in your photo. Good luck with your new journey...
  19. I sign every piece I make whether it be an exotic pot or a mug or a spoon rest and get particular satisfaction when almost every person I've sold to actually looks at the bottom of the object to see if it is signed and is happy to see that it is...and since I log every piece that I make, I mark the bottom (using a glaze pencil) with a code that lets me reference the piece primarily for glaze application so that I can reproduce the look in the future.
  20. JohnnyK

    IMG_2651.jpg

    Cool look overall...but I find the unglazed portion at the bottom less than pleasing. Would it be possible with your glaze combo to bring one of the glazes to near the bottom without having it run?
  21. 3 coats PC33 Oatmeal over 3 coats PC31 Iron Lustre on Laguna B-Mix^5 +a narrow band of 3 Duncan Renaissance Shino cream on the rim of the hex vase gave me this look...while 3 coats PC33 Oatmeal over 3 coats PC31 Iron Lustre on Laguna B-Mix^5 gave this look on the tea cup... In your photo it looks like some combo that used Smokey Merlot as the base coat...you might try Oatmeal or Blue Rutile as the top coat. The Shino Cream makes for a runny "Hare's fur" look as evidenced in the hex vase.
  22. Beautiful work, Marcia...What is the size of the piece? Is it 6" or 16"?
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