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JohnnyK

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Everything posted by JohnnyK

  1. JohnnyK

    JohnnyK's Glaze FX

    This album is starting out as a collection of Glaze FX, but will probably morph into something more expansive over time...
  2. In my experience, I have found that re-firing will probably change the characteristics of the glaze outcome unless the glaze is pretty basic. Here are a couple of pix of a bowl that had a defect which I tried to repair. The second firing caused other problems, but you can see where the glaze is different in the 2nd firing.
  3. I think if you use a plastic mold or mold liner, you would have to spray it or wipe it with some sort of mold release to remove your clay object quickly since the plastic will not absorb water...I don't know if the mold release would cause problems with the clay afterwards. On your second thought about using the plastic cup as a liner...why not just use the plastic liner as your original mold? That would save the step of making a mold of the plastic cup...
  4. Now that my hobby farm crops are all planted, I'll be spending more time building inventory for a pottery booth at the local farmer's market. That's right... pottery at the farmer's market and veggies at MY farm stand. Even though I will also be selling pottery at my stand, I know there will be more foot traffic exposure at the farmers' market, and with a booth cost of $35, just selling one or two pieces there will cover the cost of the booth...
  5. Something else you could do here for stability is wrap the legs with plastic, then squirt some of that expandable foam into the voids around the legs. When it firms up, the foam will make the legs rigid and the plastic wrap will allow you to remove the extension, if necessary...
  6. The tan clay at the bottom is just that...the foot of the piece is unglazed. You can also try using a blue underglaze in the recessed letters and the bands, coat the letters and bands with wax resist and then finish glazing with whatever floats your boat...
  7. Welcome to the forum! Could you upload some photos of the platter? Shots of the top, bottom and side would be good so we could get a better idea of the outcome. How big is the platter? does it have a foot and did you glaze the foot? If it is large and has a foot, does it have a center support bump? Answers here would help us better to make suggestions about steps to possibly salvage the piece...
  8. Way to go, @Mudfish! Hopefully we'll get to see what you've been burning!
  9. Welcome to the forum, Nemo. There shouldn't be any difference between the two methods. One uses hand powered crank and the other uses a motor to turn the crank. The outcome should be the same...
  10. Go here to contact owner...thefoxyhipstershop on Etsy to find something related to the mug...
  11. My guess would be a decal of some sort...you might contact "The Foxy Hipster" with the query...https://www.etsy.com/market/foxy_hipster
  12. Corian is a material that comes to mind. Another that would be less expensive would be MDF. I would think that the MDF would work if it was sealed to keep it from absorbing water...
  13. From the album: JohnnyK's Glaze FX

    This is the second of a pair of integrated chip & dip bowls with another of my signature glazes...
  14. From the album: JohnnyK's Glaze FX

    This is the first of a pair of integrated chip & dip bowls with one of my signature glazes
  15. You might just forgo using the stone you picked up at the beach and get one that has been polished smooth. I've tried the smooth beach stones before and found that although they look smooth, they are still somewhat porous and don't give you the real shine you get with a polished stone. Something I have thought about experimenting with are glazed pieces of different shapes to fit various contours on pots that I just can't get with stones...
  16. As far as brushes for fine lines on dampened bisque, you might look into the pinstriping brushes that automotive and motorcycle artists use for the fine line painting they do...
  17. The next question might be...once you have these little pieces glazed, how do you plan on firing them without them fusing to the kiln shelf. How are you going to support them off the shelf so they don't stick? What cone do you plan on firing them to? You have to think ahead in the overall process...
  18. You might look at Amaco's website: American Art and Clay Company | AMACO Brent Amaco has a couple of packs of a variety of glazes and underglazes in colors that might interest you. Click on "Glazes & Underglazes" and then click on "Class Packs"...I think you will be able to find what you want there...
  19. Hi Olga...That is a beautiful and intriguing sculpture! As for firing it, it should be absolutely, positively bone dry before you even think of putting it in the kiln because if you're worried about the steam escaping properly you'll be looking at an explosion. What are the dimensions of the piece and, except for the holes in the bottom, is it solid? If so, it will take a long time to get to the bone dry state.
  20. One of the things I do when storing a bag of clay that has been opened with some of the clay removed is to put a wet piece of towel about the size of a hand towel in the bag before closing it back up. That seems to keep the clay's moisture at an adequate level during storage...
  21. If you decide to hand your spoons, some thought will have to go into the design of the stands. This is an example of not enough thought...
  22. From the album: JohnnyK's Glaze FX

    The Amaco PC Ancient copper came out looking like almost real tarnished copper
  23. And then there is the spouse as a critic or should I say "a balance"? Occasionally I'll pull a pot out of the kiln whose glaze isn't exactly as I anticipated or I forgot a step in the glazing process, I'm disappointed in the outcome because it's not what I expected, and my wife will say "That looks really cool...I like it". Other times I'll put out a piece that I'm not totally enamored of and a customer will just love it and buy it. Art and beauty is definitely in the eye of the beholder...
  24. I know this will rile @Mark C. and some of the other potters, but for me it was the movie "Ghost" and not so much for Demi Moore but what she was doing with the clay...I thought at the time that it looked pretty cool what she was doing and that someday, when I retired, I would be doing that. It was the act of slapping a shapeless blob of clay onto a wheel and turning it into something useful. Each movie after that which had a throwing scene added fuel to the little fire until I did a remodeling job for an 87 year old ceramist (not a potter). While we were talking in her kitchen one day, I noticed a couple of funky mugs that she had on a shelf and she mentioned that those were the first pieces that she had made many decades before. She suggested that I take a Learning Exchange class at our local pottery supplier Alpha Fired Arts. She also asked if I might be interested in an old Cress kiln that she had wanted to get rid of because she had a newer kiln that she wanted to start using. Got it for free if I would just haul it off...which I did. I then signed up for the Beginning Pottery class which would last for 6 weeks, meeting on Thursday evenings with full studio access as long as the store was open. Since I was still working full time, I was only able to do extra time for a couple of hours each Saturday. Well, the instructor said he only expected us to finish 4 pieces during the class and was absolutely blown away when I produced more than 20. Part of the inspiration to continue was while I was working those Saturday mornings, I was sitting side by side with professionals who rented access to the studio space, equipment and kilns on site. Not too long after that, a friend of mine asked me if I would be interested in borrowing a CI wheel that he found in a barn on a piece of property that he had just bought. He said that I could keep it for as long as I wanted. I just had to clean the dirt and black widows off it. He dropped it off but it didn't have a splash guard. I ultimately fabricated my own, which turned out to be better than the original design. Then I started taking classes at a local Junior College where I increased my learning of the basics and expanded my skills, getting an A in both Ceramics I & II. All of the work that I did at Sierra College was ^10 but my kiln was only a ^6 kiln, and a tired one at that, so the work I did at home was almost all low fire. I did do a few manual ^6 firings, but decided that manual firings were not for me so I sprung for an Orton controller. With that in place the firings became a lot easier. Then I came across a Cress ^10, little used kiln that the owner who said she was a potter, but was moving and her new place didn't have the space for her kiln, decided to give up her hobby. I got the kiln for $500, but along with the kiln, I had to take what was 300 pounds of boxed dried clay. (It's surprising how much lighter the bricks are when they are dry!) Some were ^6 and some were ^06, but most were red clay, all of which is still stacked in my garage. As time progressed, the old kiln started to fade and would only fire to ^1 so I wound up selling it and a kickwheel to someone who just wanted to do low fire work. My wife and I took advantage of an opportunity to buy the property next door to ours which had a house, a large carport, a small studio apartment, and 3/4 acre of bare ground, all of which needed a lot of work. We fixed the house and the carport and rented that, and told the renter that the studio apartment would be mine and that I was making it my pottery studio. He was OK with the plan and I fixed it up to suit my needs. I've since taken a Raku class at Sierra College and have been working at making and selling enough stuff to pay for the habit. The hardest part is working the land, part of which I turned into a farm, and spending time producing pottery. Right now, the farm is more profitable than the pottery and takes up most of my time since Spring has sprung and I'm prepping the ground for my new crop, but the plan is to take a break now and then to build some inventory so I can set up a booth at the local farmer's market and sell pots there where I would get more public exposure than at my small farmstand, So, I've been at making pottery for more than 10 years, more so since I retired from the remodeling business 3 years ago and it looks like I'll be doing it for a long time to come. Who knows...maybe I'll still be throwing when I become a "Ghost"?
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