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flowerdry

I'll Never Be A Real Potter.

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Chilly    330

I've had kids come to cycle lessons on "professional" bikes.  The kids can't ride them very well as they are so heavy and have cheap bearings that don't roll well.  So much for being a pro.  I thought I was being insulted the other day when someone said I was a Professional cyclist.  I thought they meant I was a road cyclist who got paid.  I 'spose I am a pro cyclist as I get paid for riding my bike, but in a different way to the accepted term.  

 

I'm happy being an amateur potter.

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Rae Reich    67

 

 

I have only shaved twice in my whole life and do have a short beard.I never thought it as a prerequisite to potting-I was called an animal today if that counts.

Mark

 

Mark;

What were those two times when you shaved your beard? Probably something serious,like a girlfriend.

TJR.

 

First time was when I turned 30 to see what I looked like.

Second time was after being married 10 years to surprise my wife who had never seen my face.

Both times where BAD ideas.I'm done with the thought of it again

Mark

I can relate to your wife. In the second grade we drew family portraits to be displayed on Parent's Night. I was proud of the carefully drawn "Clark Gable" mustache that signified Daddy to me. On the night, in front of the drawing, I looked up to confirm my verisimilitude only to discover that Daddy had inexplicably shaved it off! And I hadn't noticed from my 3' perspective. I was devastated, as though my abilities had been called into question before the world! As far as I can remember, he never shaved it off again for the rest of his life.

Rae

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TJR    359

I have only shaved twice in my whole life and do have a short beard.I never thought it as a prerequisite to potting-I was called an animal today if that counts.

Mark

Mark, you animal, you. Hate to break it to you, but not all animals have beards. What about lizards?

TJR.

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Pres    896

So, I worked as a teacher for many years, and thought of myself as a professional, in my manner, the respect I gave others, the time I put into preparation, planning and presenting lessons, my writing skills in creating documents for curriculum and state approvals, and the way I dressed and carried myself. I never considered myself a professional artist, potter, sculptor, printmaker, jeweler, or weaver, or even animator, as those things were what I taught. I knew back then that I was able to use the tools, design and execute an object, but only because I was teaching these things. Now I wonder, where did the change come in, where I was no longer doing as taught to teach others, but where now I explored different paths and avenues to raise the bar for my students and myself. Now that I am retired, and spending much more time analyzing what I do, how I do it, and especially why I do it a certain way, I realize how much there is yet to learn, and how little time to do it. When can anyone become a professional where they know exactly what they are doing. I think to some of the artists out there that found a niche, and stayed with it for years. Are they professional because they stay where they were 10 or 20 years ago? Is the constant search for style as illusive for others, as it is to me? I can't consider myself a professional potter, when I have so many questions!

 

best,

Pres 

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JBaymore    1,432

Is the constant search for style as illusive for others, as it is to me? I can't consider myself a professional potter, when I have so many questions!

 

I think "style" finds you, you don't "find" it.  And yes it is illusive.  It is the answers to all those questions.  And it evolves as long as you keep asking those questions.

 

best,

 

.......................john

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I have only shaved twice in my whole life and do have a short beard.I never thought it as a prerequisite to potting-I was called an animal today if that counts.

Mark

 

Mark, you animal, you. Hate to break it to you, but not all animals have beards. What about lizards?

TJR.

Clearly you have never heard of the totally adorable bearded dragon! ^_^

 

And dangit! Terracotta ain't just for old ladies--I just like bright underglazes, heehee. And come on. Ya'll gotta be nuts to not love the rich red of micaceous redart... mmmm... SO YUMMY. ♥ I like ^10 reduction pottery, but it is waaaay not what I need. I really miss ^6 sometimes, but then I get to thinking that honestly? My kind is a rarity. It took me years to accept that lowfire is the right place for me, just because most of what I see is mid/high fire and I felt left out. I got really depressed, like IN TEARS depressed, because I sometimes thought my work was "less worthy" than all those creamy porcelains or chunky woodfired pieces. It really boils down to personal insecurity, I think. As artists, that little bugger whispering in our ears is difficult to get rid of, lol...

 

But, I love my red clay. It does things with the glazes I found that are gorgeous, and since I fire a bit higher than the glaze is rated for, my work is safe for regular use (and I glaze the bottom). I'm a happy guinea about my work. ♥ I just wish my stupid hands worked better, grrr...

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flowerdry    128

 I can't consider myself a professional potter, when I have so many questions!"

 

Pres, I think your ponderings are worthy of a whole other topic.  What does it mean to be a professional potter.  For me, being a professional didn't meant I had no more questions.  In fact, it might have been the reverse.  It meant I had the training, background and experience to know which questions to ask..  Not pottery, by the way, because professional I am definately not.

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PRankin    181

But, I love my red clay. It does things with the glazes I found that are gorgeous, and since I fire a bit higher than the glaze is rated for, my work is safe for regular use (and I glaze the bottom). I'm a happy guinea about my work. ♥ I just wish my stupid hands worked better, grrr...

Guinea, what cone do you fire at?

 

Paul

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I fire my stuff at ^03. :) Maybe I just have some seriously good quality terracotta, but I have never had a problem with dishwasher/microwave/counter peeing with my pieces when they were fired at that temp. I also make sure to leave room for a deeper foot so I can put glaze inside there. That adds further protection against leakage, and it looks pretty! ^_^

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After a conversation with a friend on Facebook the other night, I have some other things to add to the "must-haves of a real potter" list.

You must have an Instagram account where you post about your amazing studio where you woodfire to cone sixteen and post videos of your naked torso while throwing porcelain on a treadle wheel. This Instagram account must also occasionally feature your *unspeakably* cute pet rabbit. In the event you do not own a pet rabbit, you may borrow your neighbours. (I'm lookin' at you, @tortus_copenhagen)

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Benzine    610

There is no sense in getting that fancy with your meatloaf wedging John.

 

I just pug all my metloaf.

 

The funny thing is, pug mills, especially the old Walker mills, look similar to the grinders meat departments use to make their ground meats. And that's why safety is important around said equipment. You don't want to go from mixing clay to ground Chuck...or whatever the operator's name is...

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Babs    386

Let your pots do the speaking!!!  Real pots speak to the handler viewer, no need to open your mouth to justify what you love doing.  Otherwise you may have to take up the profession of orator

I  emerge from my shed a "nicer" person, well most days.Makes me livable withable, but real potter, ? I don't know. Though I do love the expression, get real, but that seems elusive some days.

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ChenowethArts    461

@Babs  I'm going to borrow your livable-withable phrase.  I think I need "Clay Makes Me Livable Withable" on my apron.  I'm definitely part of that club...and back to the original subject, if you are a livable-withable clay person, I definitely call you a real potter.

 

Peace,

Paul :)

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Pres    896

Was teaching a class yesterday to adults, and one of the ones in the back whispered. . . he's a real potter.  Can't imagine.. . nice to hear, don't think of myself that way, but then again. . . Thank goodness for hearing aids!

 

 

best,

Pres

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Heck, ya can't be, do or know everything. But at least here, when and if you want to, you can find all kinds of great advice. Don't sweat it, enjoy. If you have stress, then you have bad health; if you have bad health, you can't enjoy life. Happy Valentine's Day. :wub:

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JBaymore    1,432

What exactly IS a real potter?

I think if you are

a: not imaginary, and

b: make pots

 

You are a real potter.

 

 

How do you know that you are not actually an avatar type creation that makes pots in some sort of galactic wide simulation program...and you are just "code"?  ;)

 

best,

 

.............john

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