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Biglou13

Signing Inside Of Foot Ring?

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Biglou13    202

I think This is a John b. (Sensei aka yoda) question.

I think you mentioned about not signing pots inside of foot ring?

Is this an eastern rule?

Is there a story behind the rule?

 

A few months ago I started signing outside of ring, it just felt natural...

 

What about Flatish plate with no foot ring. Where do you sign?

 

I just got some pieces back from wood fire and there is old sig (before I developed current sig) inside of footring. I don't like it. Some of these pieces were dropped off 6 months ago. In six months my work has progressed. Many of these have amateur issues. Well at least my signature is better.

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Mark C.    1,805

For me it's a function thing

I want the signature not to interfere with the look and feel and how easy it is to clean

I sign the bottoms as that is where there is less interference with its function

The pot is not about me the signer but the form and how it works and feels

My makers mark is for me at the bottom of the list-hence the bottom of the pot

 

I do like a chop mark outside the foot ring like under a handle but it's not my thing as that takes one more step.

I sign when done trimming and not when it's soft enough got a chop impression

If I where making one of a kind pricey pots then I might have a different approach but I,m not

For me western/ eastern is not the issue but where the function lies

My 2 cents

Mark

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Mark C.    1,805

On many forms I have a raised nubbin in center of foot ring and sign this as glaze does not cover this as it's waxed.

Mark

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ChenowethArts    461

I always see the footring as a little round frame for my sig.

I agree with the footer/frame idea. To me and all of my fans (both of them :rolleyes: ) this is like a seren'dipitous-plus to the piece that says, "you cared enough to pay attention to something that not everyone will see".

-Paul

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JBaymore    1,432

Lou,

 

That comment I made was relative to the tradition in Japan.  And in particular I think that it was relative to Chawan.  With few exceptions, sigs are typically outside the footring.  Western pottters seem to more usually sign within the footring.  But of course...... every generalization is wrong.

 

best,

 

...................john

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Pres    896

I usually sign the footed ware, usually plates with a new line and wave at the ends just inside of the foot. The R-an old lead letter stamp is place between the two wavy ends, then I sign and date inside of the new circle. Elaborate, but part of the finishing of the piece for me.

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clay lover    133

I don't have a good answer for this.  I think the bottom of the pot tells much about what the potter thinks of his work and with a largish bowl, I put a very carefully done foot ring.  I like the look of glaze inside the foot ring, so I never like the way the signature looks.

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ayjay    119

Is this an eastern rule?

Is there a story behind the rule?

 

 

 

Surely the only rule is that there are no rules - I sign my pots inside the footring.

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Brian Reed    23

I stopped signing all together and made my own stamp from clay and bisque it.  I now press my mark on the outside of the foot ring where there is no glaze.  I tend to put a deep think foot ring on most of my work and the stamp goes very well there.

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Tyler Miller    331

I'm uncomfortable signing anything at all, but that's a practice I need to change.

 

I think as long as what you're doing fits with your own personal aesthetic, or, to speak in more objective terms, fits with the aesthetic of the piece you're producing, it doesn't matter what you do.

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Pres    896

Guess I my mind was changed on signing years ago. I never signed anything that I made, drawings, paintings or such. Then when I went to college, art education classes, if your name wasn't on it-it wasn't graded. We were brainwashed into believing that if it was worth anything your mark or signature had to be on it to brand it as yours. Those old thoughts have stuck with me, and even napkin sketches I sign! :D

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schmism    21

I  currently initial the bottom just inside my foot ring.  Im working on my stamp which will be of a size that will allow me to apply it to the outside edge of my foot ring.   For plates or no-trim bowls/cups they will get a stamp just inside the bottom edge. 

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williamt    13

I like to sign and date and use my stamp inside the foot ring. I think I look at it as a posterity thing. And caring enough about your work to not be anonymous. Who knows, someone might dig your pot out of a midden one day and think "who was this person" and a connection is made.

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I'm uncomfortable signing anything at all, but that's a practice I need to change.

 

I think as long as what you're doing fits with your own personal aesthetic, or, to speak in more objective terms, fits with the aesthetic of the piece you're producing, it doesn't matter what you do.

 

I find my signature is in the form and marks my fingers have made whilst producing the piece. I can tell one of mine if it is not signed but I do stamp the outside of the foot for the customers.

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Biglou13    202

Here is current sig just after trimming, I sand down edges after bisque. I use a pencil. It's a version of my initials three times on bottom outside of footring.

post-25544-0-42363100-1398477132_thumb.jpg

post-25544-0-42363100-1398477132_thumb.jpg

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Pres    896

Guess I my mind was changed on signing years ago. I never signed anything that I made, drawings, paintings or such. Then when I went to college, art education classes, if your name wasn't on it-it wasn't graded. We were brainwashed into believing that if it was worth anything your mark or signature had to be on it to brand it as yours. Those old thoughts have stuck with me, and even napkin sketches I sign! :D

 

 

So a load came out today, and while doing photos I took this one while it sat on the deck.

post-894-0-21179900-1400126427_thumb.jpg

post-894-0-21179900-1400126427_thumb.jpg

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Pres    896

Standard Ceramics-112 BROWN CLAY (Cone 4-6) Plastic clay for wheel and modeling. The addition of granular manganese gives a speckled surface. The ideal temperature for developing best color tone is cone 5. Good results may be expected in reduction or oxidation firing. NON-TOXIC%20copy.jpg
Shrinkage:  12% at C/4, 12.5% at C/6. 
Absorption:  4.5% at C/4, 2.5% at C/6.

 

Cone 6 Oxidation

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oldlady    1,323

pres, that clay is     112    not 12.  used it for years,  not lately.

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Babs    386

Thank you. Now I will seek granular Manganese or a similar clay in Aus. This effect but with larger speckle is what I hope to acheive by adding ironstone grains.

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Pres    896

Yes, you are right, my copy/paste did not get all of it. I have been using it now for about 20 years also. I also used the non manganese version(225) at the HS as I like the working properties, but did not want to run into the possible "You stole our clay" accusations. Not that it would happen, but nothing wrong with protecting your back by being proactive.

 

Oh yes, I corrected the post to 112.

 

granular manganese is poisonous, larger amounts I would not want to use in a body. However, the effect is nice, even though it does mimic the iron bearing high fire stonewares.

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TFPots    0

Pres- I have been using 112 & 225 for the last couple of years, and normally the 112 looks like your photo.  However, the last batch I bought -( I usually get a a few hundred pounds at a time)- looks a lot different.  The specks are much larger and more of them-- it ruins the effect of the glaze I  like to use on it.  Have you run in to this problem before with this clay?  

(Mississippi)

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Pres    896

No I haven't. I have had very good luck with the two clays for years. This last batch was part of a one ton order half the batch, and the other half being the hazelnut that I have been struggling with. I would call SC about the problem with the batch to see if they have changed anything. They are really good on customer service, but then I buy direct from them and have had a good relationship as I also bought clay for school.

 

best,

Preston

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