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if you could be any potter?


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#1 oldlady

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Posted 11 May 2013 - 06:45 PM

so much out there is beautiful, whose work would you like to claim as your own? not their lifestyle just the pot or pots. anything goes.

mine would, hands down, be tom coleman.
"putting you down does not raise me up."

#2 Diane Puckett

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Posted 11 May 2013 - 07:08 PM

Cynthia Bringle!
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#3 Iforgot

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Posted 11 May 2013 - 11:36 PM

Penny Woolsey
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Raku, Pit fired, Majolica, and Stoneware ceramic artisit

#4 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 12 May 2013 - 09:56 AM

For me, of contemporary potters it would be Judy Motzkin
http://motzkin.com/ceramics.htm

or Christina Cordova
http://www.cristinacordova.com/gallery

. I love their work.

#5 mrpeders

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Posted 12 May 2013 - 11:53 AM

so much out there is beautiful, whose work would you like to claim as your own? not their lifestyle just the pot or pots. anything goes.

mine would, hands down, be tom coleman.


Thank you for sharing his name. I love to look at other's work, and this is really interesting.

#6 ayjay

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Posted 12 May 2013 - 01:45 PM

John Calver is one that springs to mind.

http://www.studiopot...ories//calver_j

#7 Pres

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Posted 12 May 2013 - 03:38 PM


so much out there is beautiful, whose work would you like to claim as your own? not their lifestyle just the pot or pots. anything goes.

mine would, hands down, be tom coleman.


Probably myself 20 years younger, and a little more motivated!:   :wacko:   However, I have always admired the work of John Glick.

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#8 Nelly

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Posted 12 May 2013 - 09:46 PM


so much out there is beautiful, whose work would you like to claim as your own? not their lifestyle just the pot or pots. anything goes.

mine would, hands down, be tom coleman.


Probably myself 20 years younger, and a little more motivated!:Psrc="http://ceramicartsda...lt/tongue.gif"> However, I have always admired the work of John Glick.


Dear All,

If I could be any potter I would be Lucie Rie, Hans Coper (for their stylized simplicity and strength of design) or Walter Ostrum (for his highly knowledgeable ceramic brain and talent).

Nelly

#9 Mark C.

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Posted 14 May 2013 - 11:15 AM

I'm happy in my own skin-never would like to be someone else.
Mark
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www.liscomhillpottery.com

#10 Chris Campbell

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Posted 14 May 2013 - 11:30 AM

Phew ... I'm glad someone finally said it!!
I could not think of any other potter whose work I want to make.
I want to look at it, feel it, drool over it but not make it or even claim it.

Chris Campbell
Contemporary Fine Colored Porcelain
http://www.ccpottery.com/

https://www.facebook...88317932?ref=hl

TRY ...   FAIL ...  LEARN ...  REPEAT


#11 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 14 May 2013 - 11:50 AM

Yes, Chris and Mark. You're right. I do like/admire the work of the people I mentioned as well as many more, but I am happier in my own skin too. Can't really find the time to execute all the ideas I already have.

Marcia




#12 OffCenter

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Posted 14 May 2013 - 12:14 PM

I'm happy in my own skin-never would like to be someone else.
Mark


Ditto.

Jim
E pur si muove.

"But it does move," said Galileo under his breath.

#13 Natania

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 08:21 PM

I can think of many potters with whom I'd like to have a cup of tea and a long chat about pots with though! Lucie Rie, and also Edmund de Waal (is it ok if they are still alive?) and Julian Stair for starters, but there are so many more inspiring ones out there....

#14 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 18 May 2013 - 11:45 AM

Yes that is fun. I had tea in St. Ives with Janet Leach.
Lunch with Dave Shaner at Frances Senska's house.
Breakfast with Richard Notkin at my house.
Coffee with Kurt Weiser at my house.
Cheerios with Bill Daley in early morning at the Bray.
Plus many visits with potters in New England, Montana, Russia,Iceland, Uzbekistan, Latvia, Italy, and Spain including Ardcadi Vlasco, Allessio Tasco, Vladimir Tsivin,
Dancing with Rudy Autio at the opening of Garth Clark's 100 Years of American Ceramics show in Pullman , Washington.
Jack Troy and I sat next to each other on a bus trip to possibly the Hill of Crosses in Lithuania. His pack was above us and his garlic was dripping on me. He was eating garlic for his cold. That was a trip!I thought the bus was leaking. It was pouring rain and there were holes in the bus. I believe we went to the Hill of Crosses in Lithuania that day.

Great memories..

#15 Denice

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Posted 18 May 2013 - 09:25 PM

The only person I came up with Beatrice Wood and it wasn't her work that drew me to her but her calm and gentle attitude towards life. Her luster glazes are sensational but her aurora was even better. Denice

#16 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 18 May 2013 - 10:44 PM

The only person I came up with Beatrice Wood and it wasn't her work that drew me to her but her calm and gentle attitude towards life. Her luster glazes are sensational but her aurora was even better. Denice

I don't think I would ever think of Beatrice Wood as calm and gentle.I admire her greatly. She had a zest for life, and "chocolate and young men" Have you ever seen the movie, Mama of Dada? Or read her autobiography.."sometimes I Shock Myself? She was an absolute wonderful character. Good choice.
Marcia

#17 Denice

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Posted 19 May 2013 - 07:56 AM


The only person I came up with Beatrice Wood and it wasn't her work that drew me to her but her calm and gentle attitude towards life. Her luster glazes are sensational but her aurora was even better. Denice

I don't think I would ever think of Beatrice Wood as calm and gentle.I admire her greatly. She had a zest for life, and "chocolate and young men" Have you ever seen the movie, Mama of Dada? Or read her autobiography.."sometimes I Shock Myself? She was an absolute wonderful character. Good choice.
Marcia


I was thinking of later interviews with her when she was elderly. Her life and energy seem to have a soft and even flow, during the interview she would throw, have a cup of tea and then throw some wood in a small gas kiln to reduce it slightly. She didn't even seem to notice the camera and interviewer. I would have been extremely nervous, I'll have to rent that movie, reading is more of a challenge with my MS. Denice

#18 trina

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Posted 19 May 2013 - 09:32 AM

i want to be a rich one but also not opposed to chocolate and young men hahhaha T

#19 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 20 May 2013 - 07:05 AM



The only person I came up with Beatrice Wood and it wasn't her work that drew me to her but her calm and gentle attitude towards life. Her luster glazes are sensational but her aurora was even better. Denice

I don't think I would ever think of Beatrice Wood as calm and gentle.I admire her greatly. She had a zest for life, and "chocolate and young men" Have you ever seen the movie, Mama of Dada? Or read her autobiography.."sometimes I Shock Myself? She was an absolute wonderful character. Good choice.
Marcia


I was thinking of later interviews with her when she was elderly. Her life and energy seem to have a soft and even flow, during the interview she would throw, have a cup of tea and then throw some wood in a small gas kiln to reduce it slightly. She didn't even seem to notice the camera and interviewer. I would have been extremely nervous, I'll have to rent that movie, reading is more of a challenge with my MS. Denice

In the later interviews when she was very elderly is where she revealed her secret to long life was chocolate and young men. She laughed!!!
Marcia




#20 Wyndham

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Posted 27 May 2013 - 04:16 PM

I'm comfortable with myself but I do admire the life, work and dedication to the glaze development work that Harding Black achieved. I only got to learn a bit from him when I was just starting out in the mid 80's. It was a time when he was in his last few years of working with clay.
I could have learned so much more in so many ways had I met him even 5 yrs earlier.

The other part of is that we don't always recognize where we are, in those day to day circumstances that look rather common. We only to look back later on the importance 0f those times after they're past.

Wyndham




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