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Nelly

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  1. TJR

    Nelly;

    I'd like to see some images of your new Majolica when it comes out. Any chance?

    Tom.

  2. Dear Tom,

    I just got a message from TRJ letting me know about your question. No, I was not in Toronto at the OOAK. I am a university teacher and do my pots as a hobby. Someday?? Right now, most of my stuff goes to charity benefit sales. Was it a big show?? You should write on the blog about it. It is amazing the level of talent at that show.

  3. Dear Marge, Yes, absolutely. The sieving part is really important. I forgot to mention that. Nelly
  4. Dear Marge, I have gone to great lengths to make slip using Robin Hopper's recipe. People in my old studio laughed that I was taking dry ingredients and making slip in this manner. It was, however, great slip and stuck to everything. I think if you google his slip recipe you should be able to find it on-line or at the very least in one of his books. Now however, what I do is take some of either my reclaimed clay or cut off slices of the clay body I am using, dry it throughly, put it in a bucket with some water and let it slake. You don't want to add too much water but just enough to r
  5. Dear All, When I started taking classes we began with the pinch pot and progressed to trying slabs and the wheel. After many classes I found I just like the open studio format. I liked to experiment on my own to see what the clay could do on my own in those three hours. I think adults will tell you what they need from the instructor. Most classes I have taken have had some demonstration time included. It was up to the student to decide if they wanted to try this or just continue with their own little projects. For me, I like the open studio concept. But this of course was after taking many
  6. Hey Slurrious, That is one slick chart. I will definitely print this out. At my old studio we just had a book with boxes. It contained the date, time started, increase ramps, and hold times. This chart provides a visual of the whole firing. I like that--I am visual!!! Great chart finding Slurrious. I will print out a bunch of copies and start my binder. Gawd, I love this site. Nelly
  7. Dear TJR, Leaving the top peep hole open is exactly what I did yesterday. I wanted to candle for two hours but with this new computerized kiln, the "slow bisque" setting moves really slowly. My large platters were bone dry so I thought, what the heck!!! Given that candling is my usual practice, I will be trying to achieve this in a ready to go digital formula. Good reminder though about the corrosion on the wires. I forgot about that. Thank you. Nelly Nellie; Lucky you to have a brand new Cone Art kiln. I had to sell mine when I moved out of my previous studio. I
  8. Dear TJR, Leaving the top peep hole open is exactly what I did yesterday. I wanted to candle for two hours but with this new computerized kiln, the "slow bisque" setting moves really slowly. My large platters were bone dry so I thought, what the heck!!! Given that candling is my usual practice, I will be trying to achieve this in a ready to go digital formula. Good reminder though about the corrosion on the wires. I forgot about that. Thank you. Nelly
  9. Dear Mark, I am firing in a brand new just off the line ConeArt electric Kiln. When you say you keep your plugs in always, would that be similar to me keeping my peep holes shut. I used to candle with the lid open for a couple of hours with all peep holes open just to drive off last little bits of water. Interesting that you crack at 800 degrees. I have never tried doing it at the high of temperature. I was told that you should never open the lower two peep holes until it is around 400 or the temperature of an oven. Anyway, I think this could be a little more complicated and invo
  10. Dear Denise, I never use plugs. What is the difference between a plug and closing the holes?? I have seen these old ceramic plugs but never knew why they were used. I do sometimes use bright slips under a clear glaze. Perhaps I will try your professors trick some day over the summer to see how it turns out. Thank you for your response. Nelly
  11. Dear All, I was doing a bisque firing tonight. As usual, I kept the top hole open during firing. Now that it is cooling it is still open. Tomorrow, I will gradually open all three holes when it gets below 400 to hasten cooling. It occurred to me tonight, what would happen if, when I do my next glaze firing, I closed the top peep hole after I reached top temperature (i.e., including the down ramps) and I was purely in the cooling stage?? I have been taught to always keep this top peep hole open after the firing is done. My rationale is that it would contain the heat and make the co
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