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Signing Your Work, What Is Your Method?

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Joy pots    20

I sign my initials with an old stick pen.  My last name is 3 letters 2 small 1 cap so is different.

I made a stamp but just singing on leather hard is easier.  I had a ring with my family coat of arms & initials, but it wore out.

Joy

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GEP    863
2 hours ago, Joseph F said:

I thought about just not signing my work at all. I sort of sign all my work anyways with my decoration. I leave 3 dots on all my work. It has a special meaning to me, but I don't know if my customers would ever know it. Do customers find it odd if you don't sign it? Does it devalue the piece in their eyes? I am not sure what to do about this. 

Joseph if you are venturing back into the professional world, you should sign your work. It's not about value, it's just that there will be plenty of situations in the future where somebody needs to figure out who made the piece. I'm sure you can find a creative solution that will work with your pots. 

Can you stamp your stamp onto a tiny sprig, then stick it onto the bottom of your pot with a dab of slip?

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Benzine    610

What about some type of small stencil, that you can brush across with a stain or underglaze, and peel off right away?  Or a soft stamp, dipped in the aforementioned colorants?

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Joseph F    865

Lots of good ideas. I didn't even think about people trying to find me again using a signature. I'll have to make a blog post called. F with three dots Potter mark so Google finds my page when people search that lol.

I thought about the decal stuff. I have some decals that I bought to test. I was going to add some metal decals to some test pots to see how they came out. Then I was going to get into illustrator and make some random brush and splatter scratch marks then submit it to be turned into a metal screen to be applied to my work. However I never got around to it.  Thinking about that for a signature seems like a ton of work. Putting that on then refiring just to sign your pots. I would have to be selling cups for $50-100+ for that to be worth the effort? Maybe one day!

I do like the simple idea of a stencil with my initial and then just plop down iron oxide stain over it and lift the stencil. That seems easy and consistent. 

I think for now I am going to shrink my stamp down and try a small dab of clay with slip like Mea talked about. Would be the easiest thing for me to do after trimming. Finish 20-30 cups. Get a bunch of little balls then stick them on via slip plus stamp. Quick and easy. 

Thanks for the ideas everyone I will try some out this weekend!

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beaver681    2

I also either use an old ball point pen or a #2 pencil that is really dull so it doesn't leave any burrs.  I've also gone back and forth whether to date it (year only) or leave it undated - I still have work that has been bisque fired with dates 2007 and up, but never glaze fired.  In my case, since glazing is also part of the work, having two dates just isn't practical.     Since in the next 40 years, my work will be really valuable (how's that for confidence), I've wondered, after reading all these posts, whether I should have a notary stamp and sign my pieces also to authenticate my signature!  (I say that in jest, of course!!)

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Pugaboo    438

I made  a silkscreen of my logo and use that. It's nice because it can be done at leatherhard, bone dry, or bisqued stages. The screen isn't in a frame, in fact it's less than 2x2 inches, I just hold it in place with 2 fingers swipe the ceramic ink across it with another finger and I'm done. I also have a nice transfer of the same design that I use on all my transfer pieces since they go in to a 3rd firing.

i do have my Turbo Pug metal stamp that I stamp into the bottom of all my mug handles but I do that more because I like it than as a signature.

T

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Mark C.    1,807

If you make work sign work-thats my thought.

The exceptions are rubber bottoms on work-sponge holders/trucker mugs

and I do not sign spoon rests as that would slow me down to m much for a small item that I make in the many many thousands per year .

Everything else has a signature.

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Chilly    330
18 hours ago, Joseph F said:

 I can't stamp it because the walls are too thin and it leaves the stamp mark on the inside of the pot.

I had the same problem with stamping the bottom of mugs.

The solution was to find something that fitted inside the mug, so that when I stamped, the bottom didn't cave in.  I use a flat lid of a jar on the end of a rolling pin that is only just taller than the mug, and always dip my stamp into WD40 so it stamps cleanly and firmly without distorting.  

My stamp is a piece of bent copper wire glued to a piece of wood.  The wire gives a nice rounded edge to the indentation.  It was easy to make, I just drew my initial in thick pen on thin paper and used the reverse side to shape the wire.  When I say wire, I don't mean the thin stuff, but something that holds it's shape.

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