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What Should I Sit My Kiln On?


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#1 gkillmaster

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Posted 16 April 2014 - 03:42 PM

Hi All,

 

I'm setting up in a studio with a polyurethaned bamboo floor. Which of these materials is best to put on the floor and under the kiln (that is on an 8" stand; firing to cone 10):

 

1) ceramic tile backer board? if so, what brand would be best for not transferring heat to the floor?

2) these 1" insulating firebicks:  http://www.ebay.com/...S-/200900849899     ?

 

or a combination of both, backboard on the floor and kiln on top perhaps?

 

many thanks,

 

Greg K.



#2 schmism

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Posted 16 April 2014 - 03:51 PM

While you don't explicitly say,  I assume your kiln sits on a  ~1 foot tall 4 legged metal stand?



#3 gkillmaster

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Posted 16 April 2014 - 03:54 PM

O yes, sorry, forgot to say. Its on a 8" metal stand.



#4 Viking Potter

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Posted 16 April 2014 - 04:15 PM

You are trying to protect the floor from two different heat sources.  First is the heat transfered directly to the floor via the metal legs of the stand.  You need to put something under those legs that will keep heat from passing through, but still be strong and stable enough to hold your kiln.  I would think the fire bricks would be sufficient for that purpose.  You also have to protect against radiant heat that is comming from the kiln in every direction.  That heat will warm the entire area around the kiln and the closer things are the hotter they will get.  So underneath the kiln you need some sort of material that will keep the area under the kiln from recieving radiant heat and also makes sure that the material does not pass on to the floor the radiant heat that it absorbs from the kiln.  appropriate insulation may be enough to accomplish this purpose.



#5 neilestrick

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Posted 16 April 2014 - 04:19 PM

2 layers of tile backer cement board, extending at least 6 inches beyond the edge of the kiln.


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#6 schmism

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Posted 16 April 2014 - 04:29 PM

what do people think of useing a heat sheild?

 

ie single layer of tile backer board on the floor.  then 4 bricks at the locations of the stand feet, then a piece of sheet metal the size of the kiln on top of the bricks which the legs of the metal stand sit on.   

 

thus forming a heat shield that sits ~2" off the ground allowing for air circulation.



#7 Viking Potter

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Posted 16 April 2014 - 04:36 PM

what do people think of useing a heat sheild?

 

ie single layer of tile backer board on the floor.  then 4 bricks at the locations of the stand feet, then a piece of sheet metal the size of the kiln on top of the bricks which the legs of the metal stand sit on.   

 

thus forming a heat shield that sits ~2" off the ground allowing for air circulation.

As long as it works, There are tons of ways to make sure heat does not transfer, Dead air space is one, etc



#8 gkillmaster

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Posted 16 April 2014 - 05:01 PM

what kind of backer board? There are many brands and types...

 

Viking Potter, what is "appropriate insulation". I'm completely new at this. Do you mean the firebrick or air gap or another material? I'm not sure what all is available for this type of application...

 

would one layer of 1" firebrick (http://www.ebay.com/...S-/200900849899) under the feet work? This firebrick is not supposed to transfer much heat through it to the floor...



#9 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 16 April 2014 - 05:24 PM

I think Neil has a good design. I like space, air to reduce heat transfer. That is why I recommended raising the backer board on bricks house bricks would do. 

You have an exhaust system but what are the walls like. Is the kiln away from them?

 

Marcia



#10 gkillmaster

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Posted 16 April 2014 - 05:35 PM

thanks Marcia. I may try this. Does the backer board allow heat to pass to the floor or does it act as a refractory material like firebrick?

 

I have a downdraft spring mounted cup that sits on the floor at the middle of the kiln.



#11 Mark C.

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Posted 17 April 2014 - 05:50 AM

It will slow heat transfer
But what about your side of kiln and your studio walls. This needs to have some separation at least 8 inches.
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#12 neilestrick

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Posted 17 April 2014 - 08:56 AM

Use cement board. It's basically a thin slab of cement with a mesh fabric inside for structural stability. It will do a great job preventing heat transfer and protecting the wood. The other great benefit of the cement board is that it is thin, about 5/16", so you won't be raising the kiln up a bunch. Creating air gaps using bricks and heat shields is great from an insulating standpoint, but is overkill. And if you have a 27" deep kiln, you will likely make the kiln too tall to load comfortably.

 

You want at least 12 inches (preferably 18) clearance from the walls of any other combustible materials. You can put the cement board on the wall, too, if needed.


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#13 Pres

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Posted 17 April 2014 - 08:56 AM

How tall is your kiln? I have a kiln that is 45" tall with the 4th section on it. If the stand were on bricks, that could be tough to load. So think about how tall the top is before putting it on bricks.


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#14 gkillmaster

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Posted 17 April 2014 - 11:32 AM

thanks again all!

 

my kiln is 31" including the 8" stand.

 

I'm set on wall clearance. The kiln is 19" from the nearest wall.

Neil, do you feel confident that 2 layers of cement board is enough?

 

I'd have to go with your experience cause I don't think there is a way I can tell what the temperature is under the cement board once I set the kiln on it.

 

thank you!



#15 neilestrick

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Posted 17 April 2014 - 06:56 PM

thanks again all!

 

my kiln is 31" including the 8" stand.

 

I'm set on wall clearance. The kiln is 19" from the nearest wall.

Neil, do you feel confident that 2 layers of cement board is enough?

 

I'd have to go with your experience cause I don't think there is a way I can tell what the temperature is under the cement board once I set the kiln on it.

 

thank you!

 

Yes. Super confident.


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#16 gkillmaster

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Posted 18 April 2014 - 12:08 PM

 

 

 

Thanks Neil!

 

Ok, here's my final setup. Starting to cross fingers. I'm pretty sure this will work fine and was the least expensive and easiest to do with just one sheet of 3' X 5' Hardibacker cement board.

 

Thanks to everyone who helped me think this through. With this setup, I can get a laser meter under the channels and measure the heat directly below the kiln. Will post back after next firing.

 

https://plus.google....CNKp7ISK7_7kqAE

 

(hope this link works...)



#17 neilestrick

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Posted 18 April 2014 - 01:07 PM

PERFECT!


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#18 High Bridge Pottery

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Posted 20 April 2014 - 02:42 PM

You do know those photos give me a nice map of exactly where your house is? Just thought I would mention it just in case you did not know and wanted to remove it.

 

I know it is a private shared link but anybody who clicks it can find out.

 

I have one question. What is the point of that downdraft system? Does the vented air just go through the pipe to the outside?



#19 gkillmaster

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Posted 21 April 2014 - 01:35 PM

Thanks advanced member! I had no idea about that. I'm going to remove it now!



#20 neilestrick

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Posted 21 April 2014 - 02:39 PM

Downdraft vents are great! They pull just enough air from the kiln to remove fumes, mix it with lots of air from the room and expel it to the outdoors. Because of the mixing, the temperature of the ductwork stays below 150 degrees, no hotter that your clothes dryer vent.


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