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Nelly

I still can't leave my wheel dirty

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Nelly    16

Dear All,

 

Hope you aren't getting bored with my questions but am wondering about how obsessive others are with their wheels. I always thought, when I get my own studio, I will without a doubt get up after throwing and leave. Leave the mess. Allow myself the freedom from classrooms and studio cooperatives and simply allow it to be the exact way I left it after throwing. You know, covered with clay, gunge on the throwing front board or in the basin etc. But for some reason, I can't break the habit of cleaning the wheel head and the area around it. I am probably a little more fastidious given that I have a new wheel but I am not sure that is it. There is something about sitting down to a clean wheel that is nice and fresh that allows me some sort of clarity in my head.

 

How many of you still clean your wheel head and all your tools after a throwing session?

 

Nelly

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ratdog    0

Guess I need to explain why I'm so messy.

ADD I think .......well part of it but there is some practicality to my messy madness.

If I got a piece I'm working on its always possible I need some goop to stick things together .

But I do keep my bats and head clean at all times.

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Denice    243

I don't do a lot of throwing but when I do I leave it messy for several days before I clean it. I mostly work with slab, coil and some pinch, I don't clean up until I have a Kiln full of bisque firing then I have a nice clean studio for glazing in. A nice clean studio also gives me clarity when I need inspiration. Denice

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neilestrick    1,381

I clean my wheel every year or so. Just keep scooping it out as needed.... I clean my tools every few weeks. Usually just dip them in water and keep going.

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TJR    359

Nelly;

As mentioned previously, I have a slop bucket. I dump all my throwing water and slip into said bucket. I rinse my tools in said bucket. I then wash all my tools with hot water and clean out the splash pan. I don't make it super clean, but pretty good. Twice a year when I have an open house at my studio, I take the splash pan off, clean it and wheel and move it under a table for more room.

TJR.

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Mark C.    1,807

On my main throwing wheel I dump my slash pan when it fills with water/slip-maybe every other day

I have not cleaned that wheel in years.

My trimming wheel I keep clean as its always dry.

My spare throwing wheel others use is always clean as my assistant cleans it after every use.

My stoneware wheel in another area is usually kept clean.

Cleaning wheels all the time for me is a waste of my time.As I have pots to throw.

Mark

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Karen B    26

After I fill the kiln, I clean the tools (in buckets of rainwater) and recycle the splash pans and slop buckets. One wheel for brown clay, one for white clay.

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Nelly    16

Dear All,

 

I just knew this question would generate a lot of response. Sounds like we all have different ideas about how to work and I think time for many people who are professional production potters is an issue.

 

I like how some people clean everything for the process of glazing. Makes sense.

 

Nelly

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Bobg    4

I only clean out the pan when the clay builds up enough for it to be hitting the wheel. I have so many things going on that I just don't have time. When my wife uses the wheel she cleans it before and after use. She said it just makes her crazy when things are not in order. She tells me, "I don't know how you get anything done out there, it's a mess".

 

Bobg

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Pam S    6

I clean the wheel head, pan and work shelf after every session. Once a year or so the entire thing gets a cleaning.

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lcar    1

I clean my tools a couple times a day or even hour when I 'm in the throwing stage. I have a sponge handy to wipe the top of my splash pan. I use a bat system and keep the top of my plaster bats as clean as possible with a rubber rib. after throwing a pot, I scrape the plaster bat around the pot with a firm rib that is not metallic. This helps the pot's bottom dry so it will pop off the bat easier. A metal rib would damage the bat. The inside of my splash pan seldom gets cleaned. To me it's just a waste of valuable time that I would rather be doing something else. Just because of the way I throw, not a lot gets in there and the only reason to clean it would be visual. I do wipe the top lip of the splash pan. I clean anything that will help keep the dust down in my studio or will hinder my pots if left dirty or messy. The inside of my splash pan is not one of one of those things. I run my finger around the inside of my slop bucket to push the clay around the edge back in the water, i then wipe the outside of the bucket. The next day, i pour the water off the top and pour warm water in. I start with fresh water every few days and recycle the slop (the finest particles of the clay end up in the slop and helps improve the plasticity in my next batch of clay if I throw it back in). I mop the floors to keep dust down. All cleaning in my studio is done to keep dust down or pots quality up. Efficiency and organization are also kept in mind. I "try" to leave my studio as inviting as I can for my return which means not much clutter.

 

Leanna

 

 

 

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trina    20

I learned a lot about throwing pots from a guy called Peter Ilsley (he works mainly in crystaline glazes worth looking at his stuff if these glazes interest you) anyway when he comes to spain in the winter he brings a smaller portable wheel and throws the pots in his kitchen. His tools, his wheel and his kitchen are all emaculately clean. I try to keep my stuff as clean as that as I find it just helps me stay focused. T

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trina    20

I clean my tools a couple times a day or even hour when I 'm in the throwing stage. I have a sponge handy to wipe the top of my splash pan. I use a bat system and keep the top of my plaster bats as clean as possible with a rubber rib. after throwing a pot, I scrape the plaster bat around the pot with a firm rib that is not metallic. This helps the pot's bottom dry so it will pop off the bat easier. A metal rib would damage the bat. The inside of my splash pan seldom gets cleaned. To me it's just a waste of valuable time that I would rather be doing something else. Just because of the way I throw, not a lot gets in there and the only reason to clean it would be visual. I do wipe the top lip of the splash pan. I clean anything that will help keep the dust down in my studio or will hinder my pots if left dirty or messy. The inside of my splash pan is not one of one of those things. I run my finger around the inside of my slop bucket to push the clay around the edge back in the water, i then wipe the outside of the bucket. The next day, i pour the water off the top and pour warm water in. I start with fresh water every few days and recycle the slop (the finest particles of the clay end up in the slop and helps improve the plasticity in my next batch of clay if I throw it back in). I mop the floors to keep dust down. All cleaning in my studio is done to keep dust down or pots quality up. Efficiency and organization are also kept in mind. I "try" to leave my studio as inviting as I can for my return which means not much clutter.

 

Leanna

 

 

Ha I was born in Prince George Canada !

 

 

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ratdog    0

man u got me going........ this thread stuck in my head and now i clean my wheel too often. its your falt.....LOL ..

 

 

 

thanks its a better mind set and gives a better over all feel to work area.

 

ya clean da bean an u will feel better.

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yedrow    8

I clean mine after my tolerance for little chips of dry clay getting stuck on a sponge then on my work gets too thin. It's pretty much a mood thing so there is no set period. It tends to be measured in months however.

 

To me there are two types of time, making time and maintenance time. The main effect of not imposing maintenance time is to reduce the value of making time. But too much time on maintenance has the same effect as too little. I try to find an efficient medium.

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Nelly    16

man u got me going........ this thread stuck in my head and now i clean my wheel too often. its your falt.....LOL ..

 

 

 

thanks its a better mind set and gives a better over all feel to work area.

 

ya clean da bean an u will feel better.

 

 

Ratdog,

 

I clean to keep my dust down. I try to keep things tidy but am not compulsive about it. Alright...I admit, I do take a wet sponge to the wheel head when I am done each day but nothing beyond that. I wet mop once per week or so. Finding spaces for all my stuff and getting really well organized is the point where I am now. Sorry it stuck in your mind but also sounds like you are happier with this change. Thanks for keeping me posted.

 

Nelly

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Dinah    6

No. I tidy up as and when is needed. I keep the floor around area really clean and wet mop regularly. Just bought a new Shimpo for stoneware. Wow. Have TS Legend for porcelain and an elderly RK-2 Shimpo for turning everything. My splash pan runneth over! And I love it. I like what yedrow says about making vs maintenance time. If you're not very very careful you can get involved in a sort of displacement activity wherein you think you're being ever so productive, but you're wallying around cleaning and fussing with bits and pieces and not attending to the business of your butt firmly applied to your throwing stool.

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JLowes    28

When I first got a wheel, I had been throwing in a public studio and was used to cleaning up after every thrwoing session. So, for a few months, that is what I did at home. Gradually, I got away from this practice, although I still clean the wheelhead each time, get the clay out of my sponges and tools, and if throwing a good bit or as needed, wet mop the floor area around the wheel. When I change clay color from white to color or back, everything gets a meticulous cleaning.

 

I also take all of the throwing excess mud, bits and pieces off and out of my 2 gallon bucket and put them on a plaster slab I have by my wheel to dry. Usually overnight turns it into stock you can wedge and get back into circulation the next time. When my throwing water gets a little bit too thick, I change buckets and let that one evaporate until it can be slopped into the plaster slab for recycling. I recently purchased a small pugmill and need to figure out how to get it into the process, as my recycling is too efficient to utilize the pugmill. My clay is part time, so maybe going full time will change that (you know, getting all the equipment while my day job is primary.)

 

John

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sawing    1

Before reading this thread, I never would have dreamed of leaving my wheel dirty. So, I decided to take a walk on the wild side. For the past several weeks, I have only cleaned my wheel when I switch clays. I have to admit, I like it!!

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Nelly    16

Before reading this thread, I never would have dreamed of leaving my wheel dirty. So, I decided to take a walk on the wild side. For the past several weeks, I have only cleaned my wheel when I switch clays. I have to admit, I like it!!

 

 

Dear All,

 

I have to say I can't believe the number of responses to this post. I thought it was just my own neurosis. Have I spawned something?? Know that if you went to my studio right now you would find some old newspaper under the wheel where I drop some of my trimmings. My cupboards need organizing. My tables are covered with ware and more ware in various stages of drying. The actual wheel head is clean but my life has been hectic this week. I am in and out everyday in the studio but just haven't done a thorough clean for a week or so. On top of the busy week, someone has called me and said "can you whip me up something for a wedding for this coming Saturday." I will figure out a way to do it. It is not a money thing but rather a gesture for a friend.

 

Nelly

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sawing    1

I can't leave my "studio" without cleaning my wedging table, tools, buckets, work table and towels. Can't do it. My house, on the other hand, is in serious need of a Cleaning Fairy.

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Iforgot    2

I clean my wheel head every time, but I only clean my tools and splashpan when either i decide to use a different clay of the 3rd or 4th use, whichever comes first!

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