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Karen B

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Everything posted by Karen B

  1. Clay is leather hard, so I will sign as soon as wax sets. Thank you
  2. @neilestrick, I am having trouble with my wax when I attempt to sign like that. The wax chips when I write my name, and signature is a mess. Perhaps because my wax is old. Or maybe I need to use the melting kind rather than the jarred liquid wax?
  3. Marcia, when you have time, could you post a picture of your coils? I would greatly appreciate it. Karen
  4. Hi Jojess, I am going to say grog, (because that is what I use), in place of sand, (what you use). When I have grog stuck to the back of my plates, I rub the backs together and it comes off. Or I can use any fired flat bottom to rub off anything that sticks, like grog or kiln wash. The grog should be thin to avoid unevenness. I do leave the grog on my kiln shelves, however, I do rub the sides and bottom with a clean dry green scrubby before placing in the kiln to avoid any stray grains. I don't know if you saw it, but I described how to apply the grog to the shelf above. Hi Karen, thank you for your hints and tips..i used grog on my shelves for the first time and no cracks in my hearts yay!! I am now trying paperclay, rather than the porcelain that i have been using as someone suggested that it maybe more suited to my flat pieces. I have some more hearts drying so yet to see what they will do in the first firing. That sounds like a good idea Jo. Let us know how it works.
  5. Hi Jojess, I am going to say grog, (because that is what I use), in place of sand, (what you use). When I have grog stuck to the back of my plates, I rub the backs together and it comes off. Or I can use any fired flat bottom to rub off anything that sticks, like grog or kiln wash. The grog should be thin to avoid unevenness. I do leave the grog on my kiln shelves, however, I do rub the sides and bottom with a clean dry green scrubby before placing in the kiln to avoid any stray grains. I don't know if you saw it, but I described how to apply the grog to the shelf above.
  6. Karen B

    3mugs

    Love your mugs!
  7. A word about putting grog (or sand) on your kiln shelves. I found that it doesn't need to be more than a thin coating. The easy way to get an even thin coating is to hold your hand about a foot or more over the shelf and sprinkle as you move over the entire surface. Of course you are far away from anything that doesn't need grog on it! Since putting grog on my kiln shelves, I have had no cracking.
  8. From the album: 2015

    Standard 112 clay, cone 6 ox
  9. From the album: 2015

    Standard 112 clay, cone 6 ox
  10. From the album: 2015

    Standard 112 clay, cone 6 ox
  11. Karen B

    YOY Bowl

    From the album: 2015

    Standard 112 clay, cone 6 ox
  12. Karen B

    Some Pots

    Samples of the different pots I have made.
  13. From the album: Some Pots

    Cone 04 w/carved slip design

    © cave made pottery

  14. From the album: Some Pots

    Bowl made and glazed at Danforth Art school. Cone 6

    © Karen Borg

  15. Karen B

    tile mural

    From the album: Some Pots

    6 4"x6" tiles. cone 04

    © Karen Borg

  16. I have a large plastic rain barrel which I fill with the hose right before we turn off the spigots for the winter. I've been using this for 10 years. Water is always nice and clear. It is pretty much sealed except for a plastic screwed in plug on the top and a spigot on the bottom with a mini hose. I thought this was temporary, but turned out to be all I needed.
  17. Dear Marge, I have gone to great lengths to make slip using Robin Hopper's recipe. People in my old studio laughed that I was taking dry ingredients and making slip in this manner. It was, however, great slip and stuck to everything. I think if you google his slip recipe you should be able to find it on-line or at the very least in one of his books. Now however, what I do is take some of either my reclaimed clay or cut off slices of the clay body I am using, dry it throughly, put it in a bucket with some water and let it slake. You don't want to add too much water but just enough to really cover the dried slices. After a few days of slaking, I then take a hand held mixer or you could use a blender and simply mix it up to the consistency I want. I try to really make sure if I am adding Mason stains that I mix these really well so no spots or speckles come through in the initial bisque firing. This is quick and easy and serves all my purposes. I store the slip and simply use it as required. For example, I will take some out of the storage container, mix it up again well and add my unique colorants bit by bit as needed. Works great for me. I am sure it would work equally well in a slip trailer but you may need to water it down to the right consistency. Not so watery that it runs but not so thick that it clogs the end of your bulb or bottle. Good luck. I love working with slips. Nelly If using clay other than porcelain for this process, I would recommend screening your slip after slaking and before adding Mason stains. This way you will filter out the grog in the clay and have a nice smooth slip to match your clay body.
  18. I did what most here do, pushing a bit at 300, taking plugs out etc... Then one day at about 250 degrees, I got to the shelf with the porcelain mugs, (the rest of the pieces were stoneware) and they had all shattered from thermal shock. Since then, I leave it until it is room temp.
  19. Been making pots for 30 years this year (2011)!

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