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Chamois For Cars Also Good For Clay?

chamois repurposing

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#1 Nancy S.

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Posted 18 January 2014 - 08:12 AM

While at a local store, I saw a relatively large piece of chamois for sale -- intended for use on cars. The packaging said that it was treated with something (and dang if I  can remember what it was! Some kind of oil.) so although I was tempted to buy it, I didn't because I wasn't sure if the oil used to treat the chamois would affect the clay. Then again, I'm not even sure if the chamois that I buy specifically for my clay is treated with the same kind of oil!

 

Has anyone else tried this?? Any thoughts on it? Also, regarding chamois, is it okay to run it through the washing machine before I start using it on clay? Or is that not recommended?



#2 bciskepottery

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Posted 18 January 2014 - 08:37 AM

One and the same. And, much cheaper --

Just wet it down and use it, no need to run through a washer. Any oils transferred will burn off during a bisque firing.

#3 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 18 January 2014 - 08:39 AM

I get a large chamois about once a decade. You can get them at Tandy's leather, as well auto supplies. I can get them down here at a flea market for $5. Drawing supplies have them in pieces about 6" x 6".I prefer thin ones for making rounded lips or a smooth edge in hand building.I cut strips about 1" x 5-6".
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#4 Evelyne Schoenmann

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Posted 18 January 2014 - 08:40 AM

Nancy, you don't have to run the chamois through the washing machine (but you can, I often did!). You just can rinse it in the washing through in hot water a few times. Here in Switzerland there's only kind of starch in it, no oil. Chamois is used for drying the car, not oiling it. I often use chamois on clay (in leatherhard or a bit more than leatherhard state) and also to clean my grand piano and never saw something oily. Best you try it on a trial piece first if you fear there's some kind of oil in the chamois.

 

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#5 Pres

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Posted 18 January 2014 - 10:40 AM

I have been using car chamois for years, even used the artificial ones before. They all work very much the same with a few slight differences. They do wear out a little faster maybe, but not enough to offset the cheaper price. I use a fishing float on mine, as I hate to lose them in the scrap.


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#6 ChenowethArts

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Posted 18 January 2014 - 11:54 AM

I have been using car chamois for years, even used the artificial ones before. They all work very much the same with a few slight differences. They do wear out a little faster maybe, but not enough to offset the cheaper price. I use a fishing float on mine, as I hate to lose them in the scrap.

Well, that does take all of the fun out of slicing/wedging reclaimed clay only to find a chamois surprise in there :blink:


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#7 Celia UK

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Posted 18 January 2014 - 12:58 PM

So I'm not the only one then? Like the fishing float idea, or a cork maybe?

#8 Pres

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Posted 18 January 2014 - 02:42 PM

Used to never find mine when draped over the edge of the bucket-slide in or slide off. Now it is always in reach.  When teaching, we could never find one unless we were pugging! :D  I taught my kids to improvise with a piece of commercial grade paper towel; folded over a few times and soaked in the throwing bucket it works great. I much prefer my chamois though.


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#9 bciskepottery

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Posted 18 January 2014 - 04:26 PM

They may use an oil to keep the chamois flexible in the packaging.

#10 Nancy S.

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Posted 19 January 2014 - 11:22 AM

Aha, wonderful to hear!! Thanks, everyone! I'll likely grab a pack next time I'm at that store. :D



#11 Benzine

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Posted 19 January 2014 - 11:48 AM

Used to never find mine when draped over the edge of the bucket-slide in or slide off. Now it is always in reach.  When teaching, we could never find one unless we were pugging! :D  I taught my kids to improvise with a piece of commercial grade paper towel; folded over a few times and soaked in the throwing bucket it works great. I much prefer my chamois though.

No worries if it goes through the pug mill Pres.  It's like an even stronger version of paper clay....


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#12 Pres

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Posted 19 January 2014 - 02:36 PM

You don't really want to deal with the odor where a pocket of paper towel or other organic material got into the clay. It was like hitting the mother load with all of the black gunk, and the strong smell.  The kids would just moan about it, but it did teach them to check their clay for paper towels, and other things.


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#13 Benzine

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Posted 19 January 2014 - 02:55 PM

I would imagine so Pres. I have the dark spots show up in my reclaim bin. Usually it's from bits that had been underglazed, then for whatever reason, recycled. Some of the underglazes have a pungent smell on their own. The students complain, then I tell them about the sink traps, and what that gunk smells like. Even worse, a grease trap. Even worse, the grease trap at a grocery store, I worked at, that shared the trap with the meat department. Rancid grease, and rotten meat...mmmmm!
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#14 flowerdry

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Posted 19 January 2014 - 08:32 PM

When you can't find that doggone chamois a piece of thin shopping bag plastic works well too.


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#15 Babs

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Posted 19 January 2014 - 08:40 PM

web between index and next finger works well too.



#16 bciskepottery

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Posted 19 January 2014 - 08:46 PM

I'm still waiting for the Sham-wow comments.



#17 ChenowethArts

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Posted 20 January 2014 - 06:39 AM

When you can't find that doggone chamois a piece of thin shopping bag plastic works well too.

Agreed. And from my experience, the thinner the better...the newspaper wrapper in our area is extremely flimsy and it works great.  It also finds its way into the slop bucket when I  am not careful:)


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#18 Chilly

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Posted 20 January 2014 - 08:40 AM

I'm still waiting for the Sham-wow comments.
 

OK, I'll bite...... They're good for mopping up water, but I'd bet they're pretty hopeless at rounding edges.  Too thick.


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#19 Babs

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Posted 20 January 2014 - 10:23 PM

I'm still waiting for the Sham-wow comments.

Would it fit in that guy's mouth? Too small?



#20 MichaelP

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Posted 21 January 2014 - 12:10 AM

 

Would it fit in that guy's mouth? Too small?


 

 

Not absorbent enough to soak up all  his BS.






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