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Nancy S.

Chamois For Cars Also Good For Clay?

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Nancy S.    21

While at a local store, I saw a relatively large piece of chamois for sale -- intended for use on cars. The packaging said that it was treated with something (and dang if I  can remember what it was! Some kind of oil.) so although I was tempted to buy it, I didn't because I wasn't sure if the oil used to treat the chamois would affect the clay. Then again, I'm not even sure if the chamois that I buy specifically for my clay is treated with the same kind of oil!

 

Has anyone else tried this?? Any thoughts on it? Also, regarding chamois, is it okay to run it through the washing machine before I start using it on clay? Or is that not recommended?

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bciskepottery    925

One and the same. And, much cheaper --

 

Just wet it down and use it, no need to run through a washer. Any oils transferred will burn off during a bisque firing.

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

I get a large chamois about once a decade. You can get them at Tandy's leather, as well auto supplies. I can get them down here at a flea market for $5. Drawing supplies have them in pieces about 6" x 6".I prefer thin ones for making rounded lips or a smooth edge in hand building.I cut strips about 1" x 5-6".

Marcia

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Nancy, you don't have to run the chamois through the washing machine (but you can, I often did!). You just can rinse it in the washing through in hot water a few times. Here in Switzerland there's only kind of starch in it, no oil. Chamois is used for drying the car, not oiling it. I often use chamois on clay (in leatherhard or a bit more than leatherhard state) and also to clean my grand piano and never saw something oily. Best you try it on a trial piece first if you fear there's some kind of oil in the chamois.

 

Evelyne

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Pres    896

I have been using car chamois for years, even used the artificial ones before. They all work very much the same with a few slight differences. They do wear out a little faster maybe, but not enough to offset the cheaper price. I use a fishing float on mine, as I hate to lose them in the scrap.

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ChenowethArts    461

I have been using car chamois for years, even used the artificial ones before. They all work very much the same with a few slight differences. They do wear out a little faster maybe, but not enough to offset the cheaper price. I use a fishing float on mine, as I hate to lose them in the scrap.

Well, that does take all of the fun out of slicing/wedging reclaimed clay only to find a chamois surprise in there :blink:

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Pres    896

Used to never find mine when draped over the edge of the bucket-slide in or slide off. Now it is always in reach.  When teaching, we could never find one unless we were pugging! :D  I taught my kids to improvise with a piece of commercial grade paper towel; folded over a few times and soaked in the throwing bucket it works great. I much prefer my chamois though.

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Benzine    609

Used to never find mine when draped over the edge of the bucket-slide in or slide off. Now it is always in reach.  When teaching, we could never find one unless we were pugging! :D  I taught my kids to improvise with a piece of commercial grade paper towel; folded over a few times and soaked in the throwing bucket it works great. I much prefer my chamois though.

No worries if it goes through the pug mill Pres.  It's like an even stronger version of paper clay....

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Pres    896

You don't really want to deal with the odor where a pocket of paper towel or other organic material got into the clay. It was like hitting the mother load with all of the black gunk, and the strong smell.  The kids would just moan about it, but it did teach them to check their clay for paper towels, and other things.

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Benzine    609

I would imagine so Pres. I have the dark spots show up in my reclaim bin. Usually it's from bits that had been underglazed, then for whatever reason, recycled. Some of the underglazes have a pungent smell on their own. The students complain, then I tell them about the sink traps, and what that gunk smells like. Even worse, a grease trap. Even worse, the grease trap at a grocery store, I worked at, that shared the trap with the meat department. Rancid grease, and rotten meat...mmmmm!

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ChenowethArts    461

When you can't find that doggone chamois a piece of thin shopping bag plastic works well too.

Agreed. And from my experience, the thinner the better...the newspaper wrapper in our area is extremely flimsy and it works great.  It also finds its way into the slop bucket when I  am not careful:)

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Chilly    329

I'm still waiting for the Sham-wow comments.

 

OK, I'll bite...... They're good for mopping up water, but I'd bet they're pretty hopeless at rounding edges.  Too thick.

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Nancy S.    21

web between index and next finger works well too.

 

I read this a while ago and tried it, but I have very long fingers that tend to "get in the way" with smaller pieces and I don't do a lot of very tall stuff yet.

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alabama    144

Hey,

     I have used several types of chamois and things to dress up the rims.  Shoe leather is too thick, and to me store bought chamois

and plastic bags are too thin.  Some Fire Depts. use  a commercial grade chamois for their trucks.... When they wear out and

are thrown away, they are perfect to be cut in strips for pottery. 

 

    Worn out pig skin gloves cut into strips work good as well as the leather Nike emblem on tennis shoes...The groove

fits over the rim.

See you later.,

Alabama

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