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Chantay

Lids To Glaze Buckets Stuck, Help?

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I bought some nice buckets, 3 gallons, at the local home brew supply store.  I am unable to open them after filling with glaze.  I had to find a manley man to open for me.  I tried spraying the rims of the buckets and lids with WD40, didn't help.  Does anyone have any suggestions?  I did try numerous tools.  Unlike regular 5 gallon buckets these don't have a lip that sticks out under the edge of the closed lid to use as counter pressure to my putty knife.

 

 

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Probably need to post pictures of the bucket and lid.  All I can think of is that once you get them open, make sure the mating edges of the bucket and lid are completely free of any glaze. You might try putting some grease around the mating edges.

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Forget the wd 40

Use a spray silicone on plastic to keep it slippery-you can also apple silicone grease as well (its harder to find) I use it in scuba stuff all the time-some hardware stores carry it-the spray stuff is everywhere.

Mark

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Chantay

 

these buckets usually lock with the outside rim of the lid.  in spite of being a "manley man"  I usually take a carpet knife or hacksaw and cut the outside rim vertically every six or 8 inches around the outside. This will reduce its grip substantially. You can then, if necessary, use pliers to release each section individually. If that doesn't loosen it up enough put more vertical cuts. RThis will reduce the quality of the seal but that shouldn't make a difference if you're not laying your glaze barrels on their side.

 

Larry

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She said (Unlike regular 5 gallon buckets these don't have a lip that sticks out under the edge of the closed lid to use as counter pressure to my putty knife.)


 


The 5 gallon bucket lid lifter needs an outer edge to work-I think these are the snap lids that do not hang over but a very small amount?


On 5 gallons you can cut the relive points as noted in above posts and get a tool at the store for 5 gallon lid removal and it may grab-I have one and may do your lid -depends on the overhang?


Mark


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Thanks for all the ideas. I think these have an extra good seal as they are food grade. I will probably try a couple of these ideas as soon as I get someone to open the bucket again. I will look for the tool for my other buckets. I thought these would be good to use as I don't mix up enough glaze for the larger buckets

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did you mix your glazes with hot water? This can make for very good sealing. You may try to stand bucket in HOT water, air inside expands and pops your cork without the manly man in your life! Do this with jars etc. but heat only the metal lid.

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No rubber gasket, no gunk in lid or on rim.  This is a food grade bucket.  I think it has an extra tight seal.  I use a putty knife to pop open my other buckets.  I am going to get one of those tools though.  I have arthritis and a lack of strength in my hands.  I think cutting the rim or even grinding it down some with the dremel will help with the situation.

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Is it one of the lids that has a locking strip around the circumfrence of the lid for shipping, that must be removed in order to open the lid? Or there's a type that has a series of small holes around the lip of the lid that must be cut downward before the lid can be removed.

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I think I have found the problem.  In the pic you can see (hopefully) small little bumps on the inside of the lids at the edge of the indention where the lip of the bucket sits.  I think these must be to insure a tight fight.  The silicon did ease pulling the lid off just a bit.  But I think a pass with the dremel over these will help more.

 

O, no pic, but their there.

 

 

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Not sure if your issue is the same as my experience. I bought 5 gallons orange buckets with matching lids at home depot and then the very first time I used them to mix glazes in, I snapped to the fact that they are designed to 'snap' in place and stay there. I was probably a pretty funny sight trying to pry the thing open with my hands and the language was pretty colorful. I had to use a tool as Mark mentioned to open them and they are clearly meant to be that way to protect what's inside from spilling out if the bucket fell over. I can certainly see if plaster, paint or some other building material was being stored and moved around on a job site or in truck beds this would be important.

 

I switched to some blue buckets at Lowes that have a choice of the locking lids and great thin lipped ones that are meant to be snapped into place by hand with little pressure on or off. They work great and I am slowly switching over to these. The other ones I 'fixed' by taking a crowbar and bending out the lid in a couple of spots so they no longer will 'lock' into place when the lid is pushed down. They still have a little snap in them though and your grinding idea may remove all fit.

 

Now of course if those tip over the glaze will spill out ;-)

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One thing that I will mention is I rarley snap the lids shut on glaze buckets . I just lay the lid on top.

For long term storage I close them but for weekly or every other week I do not snap them closed.

I live in mild climate so evaporation is minimal.

My glaze area has these buckets set up all the time and they only get moved when cleaned out as I usually just make glaze into another bucket and then drain thru the tailsman into that bucket .

Mark

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I find them almost impossible to grab firmly enough with bare hands. I use a rag or towel between my hands and the lid, and then I'm able to put some muscle into it without hurting my hands....

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Hydraulic fluid comes in 5-gallon buckets with a lid that screws on with a slight twist and are so easy to put on and take off.  Find a business that uses hydraulic fluid and will save the buckets for you, even if you have to purchase them…..they're great for storing glazes! 

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