Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

What Is The Most Incorrect "rule" You Ever Heard For Pottery?

by special request ...

  • Please log in to reply
82 replies to this topic

#1 Chris Campbell

Chris Campbell

    clay stained since 1988

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,222 posts
  • LocationRaleigh, NC

Posted 15 July 2013 - 02:05 PM

In the "Broken" thread we are going sideways a bit and pondering what is the most outrageous false pottery "Rule" you have heard, learned or even passed on unknowingly?

My first pottery teacher was just a treasure trove of false information and iron clad rules that were her opinion only and nowhere close to the truth. She proudly claimed to be totally self taught ... or not.

It has taken me years to discover most of them and I constantly trip over them. "You can't do this and you must always do that." Maybe if enough people contribute to this thread I will find a couple more!

Chris Campbell
Contemporary Fine Colored Porcelain
http://www.ccpottery.com/

https://www.facebook...88317932?ref=hl

TRY ...   FAIL ...  LEARN ...  REPEAT


#2 Wind n Wing

Wind n Wing

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 59 posts

Posted 15 July 2013 - 02:25 PM

Chris,

When I first started with clay it was with cone 04 slip.  The rules were pretty clear and on the mark.  But when some years later I moved into using pugged clay cone 6 for hand building and wanted to use more than one color or type ie: porcelain and stoneware.  I was told hat I could only expect failure.  What a joke that turned out to be.  I always question and try things out for myself unless shown concrete proof.  So not only do I mix porcelain and stoneware. I also mix my brands, Bray, Laugna, Immco ect.

I also mix different colors, blacks,browns, reds and the list goes on.  Presently I have 7 different colors and 6 different brands in my studio.  The only thing I look for is the firing cone and shrinkage rate.  Now I am not building any large or heavy pieces but I haven't had any problems in the last 15 years.  My advice on taking advice is take it with a grain or shaker of salt.  And experiment we all learn alot from sucess and failures both.

RJ



#3 Karen B

Karen B

    Potter 1981-present

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 182 posts
  • LocationMassachusetts

Posted 15 July 2013 - 04:46 PM

I was told many years ago that the pre-made clay from a bag had to be wedged before using. This year I took a workshop in which the teacher told us that was bunk. Well I have now thrown from many bags of clay without wedging, with no problems at all.



#4 Benzine

Benzine

    Socratic Potter

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,654 posts
  • LocationThe Hawkeye State

Posted 15 July 2013 - 05:05 PM

NOTE:  I'll just repost mine, from the other topic:

 

I propagate a few of the myths myself, mainly to make my students more cautious.  I figure that, if I tell them to do something a certain way, they will cut corners here and there.  So if I didn't "scare" them a little bit, in regards to certain things, I'd have a lot more issues. 

 

I had a coworker, who didn't think you needed to put an air hole, in large hollow sculptures.  So I made a fairly thin one, and didn't put any vent in it at all.  I let it dry a few weeks, and fired it.  There were many pieces after the firing.


"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#5 OffCenter

OffCenter

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,372 posts

Posted 15 July 2013 - 05:10 PM

The most prevalent one is that (1) air bubbles cause pots to explode. The most contentious one discussed on this forum is (2) clay fired to higher cones is stronger than clay fired to lower cones.

 

Jim


E pur si muove.

"But it does move," said Galileo under his breath.

#6 oldlady

oldlady

    single firing an electric kiln to cone 6

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,015 posts
  • Locationharpers ferry west va and pinellas park fl

Posted 15 July 2013 - 05:16 PM

benzine, how did you move your post, mine is still there.


"putting you down does not raise me up."

#7 Roberta12

Roberta12

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 149 posts
  • LocationColorado

Posted 15 July 2013 - 06:39 PM

Well, here is one!  

You never rework clay for throwing.  If you mess up and want to try again, you could not rewedge the clay.  You had to get a new piece out of the bag.  

That and the air bubble thing.  It would cause pots to explode.   (I had nightmares over that one!)



#8 Roberta12

Roberta12

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 149 posts
  • LocationColorado

Posted 15 July 2013 - 06:40 PM

Here is another one.   If you freeze clay, it makes it stronger. yep.



#9 Claypple

Claypple

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 261 posts
  • LocationReno, NV

Posted 15 July 2013 - 07:22 PM

I was told many years ago that the pre-made clay from a bag had to be wedged before using. This year I took a workshop in which the teacher told us that was bunk. Well I have now thrown from many bags of clay without wedging, with no problems at all.

 

Agree with this one, although I do play with it a little before I throw it. Just to shake it and  wake it up.



#10 Claypple

Claypple

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 261 posts
  • LocationReno, NV

Posted 15 July 2013 - 07:24 PM

Another myth: If you are right-handed, you must spin your wheel counter-clockwise, "because we said so!"

I would rephrase: "Because we, ourselves, don't know how to do it clockwise".  :P



#11 Chris Campbell

Chris Campbell

    clay stained since 1988

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,222 posts
  • LocationRaleigh, NC

Posted 15 July 2013 - 08:21 PM

Ok ... Three posts under every shelf ... Not four if you needed it because something was weirdly shaped ... I guess the shelf would explode if it did not have exactly three posts situated in their predetermined spots.

Chris Campbell
Contemporary Fine Colored Porcelain
http://www.ccpottery.com/

https://www.facebook...88317932?ref=hl

TRY ...   FAIL ...  LEARN ...  REPEAT


#12 flowerdry

flowerdry

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 79 posts
  • LocationVirginia

Posted 15 July 2013 - 08:28 PM

I held fast to this "iron clad" dictum from an instructor for 3 plus years: The sides of the opened form must be the same thickness from top to bottom before pulling up the walls.


Doris Hackworth

"Promoting the joy of handmade pottery"


#13 Benzine

Benzine

    Socratic Potter

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,654 posts
  • LocationThe Hawkeye State

Posted 15 July 2013 - 08:42 PM

benzine, how did you move your post, mine is still there.

I didn't do anything fancy.  I just copy the text, and pasted it here.


"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#14 Diane Puckett

Diane Puckett

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 398 posts
  • LocationAsheville, NC

Posted 15 July 2013 - 08:53 PM

1. Never trim the inside of a bowl. I don't do this often but recently tried it after watching the video of the potter trimming the large, porcelain bowl. It works.

2. Never throw down. If a cylinder gets off-kilter or torqued, throwing down toward the wheel will often correct the problem.
Diane Puckett
Dry Ridge Pottery

#15 Pres

Pres

    Retired Art Teacher

  • Moderators
  • 2,071 posts
  • LocationCentral, PA

Posted 15 July 2013 - 09:13 PM

Always throw counterclockwise-oops I throw both directions, sometimes on the same pot to smooth out aripple.
Shape from the bottom to the top-shaping down will collapse the form. Asian throwing shapes top to bottom. I shape up & dowc.
Freezing clay ruins it. No, it just means it has to be wedged.

Just a few I've heard, but not propogated.

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#16 Mark C.

Mark C.

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,960 posts
  • LocationNear Arcata Ca-redwood rain forest

Posted 15 July 2013 - 09:49 PM

The most contentious one discussed on this forum is splash pans which are reported to not be needed. As the car guys say BOOGUSSSSSSS- Each to thier own I say-some like them so do not.  Just another tool to be used or not.

People do use them to collect great slip for additives to clay or slip and also for keeping an area clean.


Mark Cortright
www.liscomhillpottery.com

#17 Claypple

Claypple

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 261 posts
  • LocationReno, NV

Posted 15 July 2013 - 09:57 PM

The most contentious one discussed on this forum is splash pans which are reported to not be needed. As the car guys say BOOGUSSSSSSS- Each to thier own I say-some like them so do not.  Just another tool to be used or not.

People do use them to collect great slip for additives to clay or slip and also for keeping an area clean.

 

Splash pan. Simply look at Jim: he was swearing he would never use one, and guess what? Just the last week he admitted he started using it a lot after his roof started leaking (to catch the water). So, never say never! 



#18 TJR

TJR

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,250 posts
  • LocationCanada

Posted 16 July 2013 - 07:27 AM

I think Mark and Jim should meet in a neutral point-say Canada. Mark can try cone 6 clay to see if it is stong enough. Jim can use a splash pan. Later, they can drink some stong Canadian beer, and laugh about their differences. Leave your guns at the border.

TJR.



#19 Benzine

Benzine

    Socratic Potter

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,654 posts
  • LocationThe Hawkeye State

Posted 16 July 2013 - 08:00 AM

I think Mark and Jim should meet in a neutral point-say Canada. Mark can try cone 6 clay to see if it is stong enough. Jim can use a splash pan. Later, they can drink some stong Canadian beer, and laugh about their differences. Leave your guns at the border.

TJR.

I support this idea.  Though, to be fair, isn't saying "Strong" Canadian beer a bit redudant?


"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#20 Denice

Denice

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 685 posts
  • LocationWichita, Kansas

Posted 16 July 2013 - 08:12 AM

The most ridiculous one I heard from another potter is that using metal wisks for mixing glazes ruins it by leaving microscopic pieces of metal behind'  she always used wood spoons.     Denice






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users