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When did you first touch clay? | May 14, 2013


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#1 lorielle

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Posted 14 May 2013 - 12:42 PM

When did you first touch clay? What were your thoughts and feelings?

I always enjoy hearing stories about people's first time working with clay. Some people take to it immediately, some are not so sure about it, and some people can't stand it! My first experience with clay was at a community art center class. I was a little nervous, but when I got started, I thought, "Clay, where have you been all my life?". How about you?



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#2 OffCenter

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Posted 14 May 2013 - 12:50 PM

My father used to sell dirt to the Highway Dept and they would leave acres and acres of land with no vegetation or top soil and huge ponds of clay would form. It was similar to a famous American clay, Lizella Red, since this was in Lizella. I would scoop us huge handfuls of it, round it into baseball-sized balls and throw them at other children in clay battles sometimes involving 10 or so kids, then we would go throw clay balls at cows and when really bored to a cliff over a road and throw clay balls at cars. That's when I realized clay was cool stuff.

Jim
E pur si muove.

"But it does move," said Galileo under his breath.

#3 TJR

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Posted 14 May 2013 - 03:33 PM

My father used to sell dirt to the Highway Dept and they would leave acres and acres of land with no vegetation or top soil and huge ponds of clay would form. It was similar to a famous American clay, Lizella Red, since this was in Lizella. I would scoop us huge handfuls of it, round it into baseball-sized balls and throw them at other children in clay battles sometimes involving 10 or so kids, then we would go throw clay balls at cows and when really bored to a cliff over a road and throw clay balls at cars. That's when I realized clay was cool stuff.

Jim


Jim;
This is the second post about Lizella clay. I am not familiar with it, and I know a lot of stuff. Is it a ball clay?Sadly, my local clay is called Manitiba Gumbo. As you walk down a road, your feet get bigger and bigger as the stuff sticks to it. Good for slip glaze[like Albany], but that's about it.
TJR.
Oh,yeah. I started throwing pots in grade 10. Had to teach myself on a kick wheel. Then went to art school. The rest is history. Actually, it's all history.
T.

#4 Denice

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Posted 14 May 2013 - 04:01 PM

My mother bought me a mosaic kit when I was 4 but they tiles were already fired, at 11 a teacher brought in clay for the class and every one was to make their own project. Most of the kids were making the typical clunky ash tray, I decided to make an pendant for a necklace, being a voracious reader I had just read about Mau cats in Egyptian art. When I touched the soft clay and discovered that the magical material could turn into a beautiful cat pendant I was in love. My pendant hung in a display case the rest of the year. Denice

#5 OffCenter

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Posted 14 May 2013 - 06:14 PM


My father used to sell dirt to the Highway Dept and they would leave acres and acres of land with no vegetation or top soil and huge ponds of clay would form. It was similar to a famous American clay, Lizella Red, since this was in Lizella. I would scoop us huge handfuls of it, round it into baseball-sized balls and throw them at other children in clay battles sometimes involving 10 or so kids, then we would go throw clay balls at cows and when really bored to a cliff over a road and throw clay balls at cars. That's when I realized clay was cool stuff.

Jim


Jim;
This is the second post about Lizella clay. I am not familiar with it, and I know a lot of stuff. Is it a ball clay?Sadly, my local clay is called Manitiba Gumbo. As you walk down a road, your feet get bigger and bigger as the stuff sticks to it. Good for slip glaze[like Albany], but that's about it.
TJR.
Oh,yeah. I started throwing pots in grade 10. Had to teach myself on a kick wheel. Then went to art school. The rest is history. Actually, it's all history.
T.


You asked the same question in another thread and I answered you in detail.

Jim
E pur si muove.

"But it does move," said Galileo under his breath.

#6 justanassembler

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Posted 14 May 2013 - 06:19 PM



My father used to sell dirt to the Highway Dept and they would leave acres and acres of land with no vegetation or top soil and huge ponds of clay would form. It was similar to a famous American clay, Lizella Red, since this was in Lizella. I would scoop us huge handfuls of it, round it into baseball-sized balls and throw them at other children in clay battles sometimes involving 10 or so kids, then we would go throw clay balls at cows and when really bored to a cliff over a road and throw clay balls at cars. That's when I realized clay was cool stuff.

Jim


Jim;
This is the second post about Lizella clay. I am not familiar with it, and I know a lot of stuff. Is it a ball clay?Sadly, my local clay is called Manitiba Gumbo. As you walk down a road, your feet get bigger and bigger as the stuff sticks to it. Good for slip glaze[like Albany], but that's about it.
TJR.
Oh,yeah. I started throwing pots in grade 10. Had to teach myself on a kick wheel. Then went to art school. The rest is history. Actually, it's all history.
T.


You asked the same question in another thread and I answered you in detail.

Jim

for those of us who missed your detailed answer, would you mind linking to it?

#7 TJR

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Posted 14 May 2013 - 06:20 PM



My father used to sell dirt to the Highway Dept and they would leave acres and acres of land with no vegetation or top soil and huge ponds of clay would form. It was similar to a famous American clay, Lizella Red, since this was in Lizella. I would scoop us huge handfuls of it, round it into baseball-sized balls and throw them at other children in clay battles sometimes involving 10 or so kids, then we would go throw clay balls at cows and when really bored to a cliff over a road and throw clay balls at cars. That's when I realized clay was cool stuff.

Jim


Jim;
This is the second post about Lizella clay. I am not familiar with it, and I know a lot of stuff. Is it a ball clay?Sadly, my local clay is called Manitiba Gumbo. As you walk down a road, your feet get bigger and bigger as the stuff sticks to it. Good for slip glaze[like Albany], but that's about it.
TJR.
Oh,yeah. I started throwing pots in grade 10. Had to teach myself on a kick wheel. Then went to art school. The rest is history. Actually, it's all history.
T.


You asked the same question in another thread and I answered you in detail.

Jim

Obviously, that post is no longer up. At the risk of getting slapped, could you tell me what post, and I will read it.
Thanks for your patience.
T.

#8 TJR

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Posted 14 May 2013 - 06:28 PM

Jim;
I went back and read your post in the clay and glaze technical section. No need to reply.
TJR.

#9 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 14 May 2013 - 06:48 PM

I have to include building drippy sand castles almost daily in the summers in South Jersey and fine powder on the sidewalks at Grandma's house. But the first time I actually sculpted with real clay, I was 11 and taking art classes on Sat. at the Philadelphia Museum College of Art.
After that it was another 6 years until I took a 3-D design class and made a coil-built sculpture.My dippy sand castles gave me an instant liking for Gaudi's Sagrada Famila.
http://2.bp.blogspot...ada familia.png

I got hooked on throwing in a sophomore class elective in Ceramics.

Marcia

#10 Mark C.

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Posted 14 May 2013 - 09:39 PM

Third grade-studying the spread of the California Misssions and their takeover of the locals. I made a pinch/coil pot like the locals did. Still Have it somewhere.
Mark


Mark Cortright
www.liscomhillpottery.com

#11 Pres

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Posted 14 May 2013 - 09:40 PM

When did you first touch clay? What were your thoughts and feelings?

I always enjoy hearing stories about people's first time working with clay. Some people take to it immediately, some are not so sure about it, and some people can't stand it! My first experience with clay was at a community art center class. I was a little nervous, but when I got started, I thought, "Clay, where have you been all my life?". How about you?




Elementary school, Tacoma, Washington, first experience, and I was lousy. Second experience JHS Warner Robbins, GA-dug some clay to make a car model 1/4" scale-never finished-clay dried up. Third experience,Media & Design, Mansfield State College, slab built box form 6X6X6-bitten, Full addiction, Ceramics 1, Mansfield State College,

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#12 OffCenter

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Posted 15 May 2013 - 06:09 AM




My father used to sell dirt to the Highway Dept and they would leave acres and acres of land with no vegetation or top soil and huge ponds of clay would form. It was similar to a famous American clay, Lizella Red, since this was in Lizella. I would scoop us huge handfuls of it, round it into baseball-sized balls and throw them at other children in clay battles sometimes involving 10 or so kids, then we would go throw clay balls at cows and when really bored to a cliff over a road and throw clay balls at cars. That's when I realized clay was cool stuff.

Jim


Jim;
This is the second post about Lizella clay. I am not familiar with it, and I know a lot of stuff. Is it a ball clay?Sadly, my local clay is called Manitiba Gumbo. As you walk down a road, your feet get bigger and bigger as the stuff sticks to it. Good for slip glaze[like Albany], but that's about it.
TJR.
Oh,yeah. I started throwing pots in grade 10. Had to teach myself on a kick wheel. Then went to art school. The rest is history. Actually, it's all history.
T.


You asked the same question in another thread and I answered you in detail.

Jim

for those of us who missed your detailed answer, would you mind linking to it?


TJR found it. Maybe he will do it. I have no idea where it is.

Jim
E pur si muove.

"But it does move," said Galileo under his breath.

#13 naturesclayart

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Posted 15 May 2013 - 03:12 PM

I was 10 and my Mother took me to a fellow teacher's house for lunch, her younger sister was there and she was working with clay, she asked if I wanted to play with it, I was thrilled, I made a cat, better than I could draw a cat, from memory and feel. The coolness, the texture I knew I wanted to do this. I fell in love with clay that day and was unable to work with any until I went to LSU and met Joe Bova, the teacher and artist. Changed my life.

#14 MMB

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 12:42 AM

I guess at first was kindergarten and maybe once more in elementary school. Cant say anything really sunk in. Art was always in my life but I guess the real love and realization didnt come till highschool. I remember it was when we were doing masks. We were supposed to use mannequin heads from our old cosmetology to start our masks. I hated the idea of "cheating" as I saw it by getting the head start with a perfect form. So I started with a giant chunk and carved and shaped from there. Ive always been thankful for my high school ceramics teacher. I remember that I always loathed coiled bowls. The time of year that project came around I pursued another alternative. I remember classmates going "how come hes not doing a coiled bowl?" and my teacher going "because he doesnt want to do one. Ill grade him on what he does do." Man I loved her. We had to do animal whistles once so instead I did a hamburger whistle and a spray can whistle.

I dont think it was just my love for clay that struck me then I think it was my love for anything and everything off of paper. Three Dimensional art really. Forms of sculpture and fabrication.

#15 oldlady

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 07:19 PM

i grew up in detroit. outside the city is a wonderful art "place" called Cranbrook. many famous potters learned there and the instruction was top notch. my family was not into education at all but i kind of knew something about it from visiting it as a child tourist. my interest was the architecture. the fountain is spectacular.

when i was 10 in 1950, there was little shown on television until prime time and people would buy an odd 15 minutes to show off their daughter's skill at tap dancing or whatever. (imagine that today!) one lady showed how to make a clay Kukla, Fran and Ollie alligator, (that was Ollie). she showed other things too but Ollie was great. i wish i could find out who it was, i think it was someone from Cranbrook.

she put together a package designed to introduce pottery done at home. there were 5 lbs of clay, a plaster bat with impressed butterflies and flowers to make sprigs from and a couple of wooden tools. i begged for it and surprise! it was there for christmas. the bad part was that i had to share the clay with my sister who wasn't interested in clay at all. the worse part was that i couldn't fire it so it eventually withered away from handling.

it took 22 more years before i began to work with REAL clay again.
"putting you down does not raise me up."

#16 Natania

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 08:25 PM

I didn't touch clay before college (art school), amazingly! I must have been a wandering lost soul before that!

#17 wayver138

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Posted 17 May 2013 - 10:34 AM

Last May I finished an Associates degree. At the time, the college I was attending did not offer a bachelors degree in what I was studying so I ended changing my major to one of three bachelors degrees that was offered and began that route last fall. Basically, I tried to force interest into a new major so I could stay at the same college and due to costs. Obviously, I eventually lost interest and dropped the courses besides one to rethink everything. With the extra time on my hands, I decided to try something new and took a class at a local ceramics studio this past November.

Since then, I have been hooked more and more each day. Now, I have just finished my first college ceramics course and am pursuing that route full on. It has been great! It is really wonderful when you find something that interests you and you actually want to learn and keep learning rather than forcing yourself into some other academic agenda.

#18 pattial

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Posted 18 May 2013 - 12:37 AM

Three years ago I signed up for a local pottery class. I still remember the feeling of sitting at the wheel for the very first time and letting the clay run thru my hands and thinking omg I'm doing it!!

#19 Idaho Potter

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Posted 18 May 2013 - 07:40 PM

The first time I worked with clay (other than mud pies when very young) was when my daughter (7yrs.) wanted to take ceramics and the only class available said that children under tem must be accompanied by an adult. At the time, I was a woodcarver, so--except for one pot--I produced sculptures. Didn't touch clay again for 13 years when I had a time period between classes (at BSU) that I either had to fill with a class or find a soft place to nap. It was easier taking a class--ceramics 101.

Shirley

#20 Biglou13

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Posted 19 May 2013 - 11:41 AM

Getting into dirt as a toddler
Well that's not clay, but clay Like in texture, and every one had their hands in it ........

Thinking on next first is early childhood memories Clay dough/pay dough.... Prolly not real clay... But close enough, to plant the seed, not until 40 ish years later, real clay..... fired.

Thoughts and feeling first time and every time since....... Same as when I was three.
Caution big brother is watching.
The beige is blinding!!!!!!
The middle of the road is boring

The true sign of intelligence is not knowledge but imagination.
-Albert Einstein




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