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Judith B

New Technologies

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I have been reading a lot lately about digital technologies and crafts, and I was wondering: as a craftsperson, how do you feel about these new technologies? Are you including them in your techniques or do you stick with more traditional ways of doing?

I know some of you have been potters for a long time and I'm really interested in how you react to this ever-changing technologic world? I feel like if we're to be artisans in the 21st century, we can't ignore these technologies, but how can we use them, adapt them?

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I have been reading a lot lately about digital technologies and crafts, and I was wondering: as a craftsperson, how do you feel about these new technologies? Are you including them in your techniques or do you stick with more traditional ways of doing?

I know some of you have been potters for a long time and I'm really interested in how you react to this ever-changing technologic world? I feel like if we're to be artisans in the 21st century, we can't ignore these technologies, but how can we use them, adapt them?

Judith... Sounds interesting.  Would you share what you have been reading?  Or, what sorts of new technologies you are finding most intriguing?

 

I'm just now adopting/affording computer technologies for firing sequences...and even though that has been around for awhile, it is definitely a technology that I embrace (even if it isn't 21st century stuff).

 

-Paul

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Guest JBaymore

We've got a four channel data logger on our new anagama....... melding 21st Century technology with 5th Century technology. ;)

 

best,

 

.................john

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do any of you have one of those cutting machines that the scrapbookers use, Crickut (not spelled that way) or Silhouette?  i am looking for someone with one so i can get some stencils made ACCURATELY.  I DO NOT WANT TO BUY A MACHINE myself, just need stencils.

 

if i cannot use a simple computer, how will i learn the software for one of these machines?

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I'm an old school potter with digital temp gauges and oxygen probes-vacuum mixers and digital scales.

If the new ways make my work faster and easier I'm willing to try them.

I make and sell lots of pottery so anything that speeds this up and retains my quality I'm for trying.

I do like the new high tec 100$ bills.

Mark

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do any of you have one of those cutting machines that the scrapbookers use, Crickut (not spelled that way) or Silhouette?  i am looking for someone with one so i can get some stencils made ACCURATELY.  I DO NOT WANT TO BUY A MACHINE myself, just need stencils.

 

if i cannot use a simple computer, how will i learn the software for one of these machines?

 

I'm hoping you'll get someone your side of the pond to offer to help you out, OldLady, but if not, so long as they are no bigger than A4 size, I'll do them for you.  

 

I didn't even know you could get a printer that prints with a knife. They look cool

 

I have a Robo Cutter, which is basically a plotter with a knife instead of a pen.  It's a great tool for stencils.

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Plotters revolutionized the sign industry and put the hand painted sign artist in the past. There are a few hand painters left, but not many. Those that remain typically have a plotter, but they will not tell you that they own one.

 

Sign shop's use plotters daily.

It might be a good idea to call around to different sign shops first and see who would be willing to make a stencil for you.

They can scan it and make you a stencil for a reasonable price.

The price will be cheaper if you already have vector based artwork.

They should have materials usable for a stencil good for 1 use.

If you want a reusable stencil they might have to order a special material for you.

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Judith... Sounds interesting.  Would you share what you have been reading?  Or, what sorts of new technologies you are finding most intriguing?

 

Well I was reading this book, NeoCraft by Sandra Alfoldy and even though it is not specifically about new technologies, the last chapter is about digital tools. It shows how crafts people embraced the technology for promoting their work but I was also interested in if technologies could be used directely in the processes of creating a piece. Like 3D modelling for example. So I was being curious to see how we could blend maybe the traditional stuff and the digital stuff :)

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They should have materials usable for a stencil good for 1 use.

If you want a reusable stencil they might have to order a special material for you.

 

 

I use acetates, the ones that used to be used to put on an overhead projector.  I find that if used and stored with care, they last indefinitely.  I roll out the clay to the thickness I want, then roll once more with the acetate sheet in place.  I then use a craft knife to cut round using the acetate as a guide.  I also use a tiny brass tube to cut inside corners, thus reducing the risk of stress fractures.

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I hand cut Acetate like Chilly mentioned for airbrushing. Acetate is cheap easy to use, and reusable, but it is limited mainly to flat surfaces.

 

Most of the stencil material available for plotters is low tack adhesive backed material. You can use regular vinyl with a low tack adhesive, but the Mfg does not tell you that.  Some people use regular vinyl that has a permanent adhesive it just depends on the application. Someone who etches glass may use the permanent or something with heavy curves.

 

breninc.com has various classic type stencil material for a plotter.

 

Acetate can be cut in a plotter.

 

You can use Mylar but you need a heavier duty plotter that would cut sand mask.

 

A lot of modern day stencils are cut flat with a laser and some sign shops have these, but the lasers are more of a trophy shop etching thing. Trophy shops generally charge more.

 

I think plotters were originally invented to draw blueprints, then someone got smart and put a razor blade on one.

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+1 for the use of plotter cut stencils.

I think potters have historically been developers and users of technology: metallurgy, geology, kiln building, glaze chemistry. We like our science, even if we don't always think of it as such. We all experiment in our work. The idea that potters, or clay artists are anachronistic somehow is kind of silly when you look at it from this angle. We certainly have our traditions, but Mark is a perfect example of taking those traditions and updating them. Keeping the best parts of both worlds.

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thank you, chilly, i found a forum for scrapbookers (i think) and contacted their help person.  she or he has replied asking what i want done.  i sent an email with actual PICTURES!!!! today and i am waiting for a reply.  if i had an email address i could send it to you.  

 

what is A4 size?

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thank you, peter.  that is huge! :blink:

 

i looked up Zing and was fascinated by the different things that can be cut.  someone in australia was doing so many different materials just to show the possibilities.  if i could, i would probably start a business making things for potters to roll clay over.  

 

is that the way those people selling texture mats to potters started? :o

Edited by oldlady

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@OldLady - I just found some of that craft foam.  I'm going to try cutting it on my Robo Cutter. I like that it gives greater depth than acetate.  I'll post pictures later.....

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