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neilestrick

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  1. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Pres in Lid and casserole sizing   
    If they fit well when dry, it will only take a tiny bit of warpage to mess up the lid fit after glaze firing. And glaze thickness can further mess it up. It's best to fire them together, leaving areas that touch unglazed. If the joint is too rough for your liking after firing, put some 220 grit silicon carbide on the joint with a touch of water, and grind the two pieces together. You'll get a super smooth finish in very short time.
  2. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Hulk in Glaze bleeding (crawling) under stencil   
    When I use stencils with underglaze, I find that the underglaze will bleed under the stencils. So I do it in reverse- I cover the piece in underglaze, then wipe away the underglaze with the stencil in place. There are limitations to what you can do with this method, but it may be worth exploring.
     
     

  3. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from LeeU in Centering Tips & Tricks   
    When coning up, make sure the bottom of the ball down by the wheel head is getting narrower. If not, that clay down there is not getting mixed.
    When you cone up, squeeze, don't lift.
    When bringing it down, push down with the right hand in a karate chop fashion. Push in on the top corner with your left had to prevent mushrooms and wobbles. The left hand should be just slightly tilted over the top so it's focused on the corner. Go slowly with the right hand, focus on the left hand. Anchor your left elbow in your leg or hip. Make sure your left wrist is bent so you're pushing away from you, not from the side. The pressure should be right in the crease of your left palm and down your arm to your elbow.
  4. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Pres in Centering Tips & Tricks   
    When coning up, make sure the bottom of the ball down by the wheel head is getting narrower. If not, that clay down there is not getting mixed.
    When you cone up, squeeze, don't lift.
    When bringing it down, push down with the right hand in a karate chop fashion. Push in on the top corner with your left had to prevent mushrooms and wobbles. The left hand should be just slightly tilted over the top so it's focused on the corner. Go slowly with the right hand, focus on the left hand. Anchor your left elbow in your leg or hip. Make sure your left wrist is bent so you're pushing away from you, not from the side. The pressure should be right in the crease of your left palm and down your arm to your elbow.
  5. Like
    neilestrick reacted to GEP in An alternative way to sell online   
    A quick update to this thread: I am in the middle of another one of these “home delivery” sales. Heading out to start deliveries this morning, This time I used a route optimizing website (RouteXL.com) to plot my routes. This saved so much time! It only takes about 10 minutes to generate one of these routes. Not only does it find the shortest route, it also tells me what time I will arrive at each location, which then lets me tell the customers what time to expect me. 
    I found a few websites that seemed like they would work,, but this one was the most user friendly, and didn’t require me to register an account. I can only plot up to 20 addresses at a time, but that’s ok because my longest route this week is 18 addresses. 
    Thank you to @dhPotter for sparking the idea, and to @neilestrick for pointing out that these websites already exist.

  6. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Callie Beller Diesel in Lid and casserole sizing   
    If they fit well when dry, it will only take a tiny bit of warpage to mess up the lid fit after glaze firing. And glaze thickness can further mess it up. It's best to fire them together, leaving areas that touch unglazed. If the joint is too rough for your liking after firing, put some 220 grit silicon carbide on the joint with a touch of water, and grind the two pieces together. You'll get a super smooth finish in very short time.
  7. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Roberta12 in Ceramic tile with messages   
    Text is going to be tedious no matter how you do it. Decals would give you the cleanest text. Stamping into the clay is another option, but if you want contrasting color to the text, trying to fill it in with a color like an underglaze is a real pain and tends to look messy. Underglaze transfers may be a good option- Isla Transfers will do custom work.
  8. Like
    neilestrick reacted to Min in Making slipcastings look more organic   
    If you add grog or sand to a casting slip you really need to get the deflocculation and viscosity exactly right or the grog (or sand) is going to settle to the bottom of the cast, this is going to take a lot of testing and trial and error to achieve. Other thing is the outer wall of the cast will be smooth from the fine particled clays in the casting slip, grog or sand likely won't  show on the surface like in your first image example. If you do manage to cast with grog dispersed fairly evenly you would then have to scrape down the outer surface to get it to show. Other option would be to use smooth casting slip then brush on a grogged slip on the piece after removing piece from the mould. 
  9. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Maskedmaven in Skutt model 181 kiln?   
    Best bet is to look at the wiring diagram and do what it says. The 181 is unique because it's a 4 wire system. The two hots will connect to the sitter. The neutral will go out to the elements and the other section. The ground will go to the case and the other section.
    Any of the other wires should be replaced if the covers are turning brown instead of white, or if they're crispy and crack when you bend them. You should be able to order a new wiring harness from Skutt. The feeder wires, those that go from the switches to the elements, are typically connected with crimp connectors, so you won't be able to change those until you change the elements.
  10. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Chilly in Handles snapping in two.   
    You're attaching them too wet. Make the handle, and immediately lay it out in the shape you need. Let it set up until it's just barely still flexible, then attach it to the pot when the pot is as wet as possible.
  11. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Chilly in Firing thick sculpted clay   
    Why so thick? At 2" you'll not only have explosion problems, but also cracking in cooling. Get them down to 3/4" at most and they'll be a lot easier to fire.
  12. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Ji Kim in Need help with a Shimpo RK2   
    @Ji Kim Now they're showing. Thanks! Someone who has one of these will likely respond soon.
  13. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Babs in Handles snapping in two.   
    You're attaching them too wet. Make the handle, and immediately lay it out in the shape you need. Let it set up until it's just barely still flexible, then attach it to the pot when the pot is as wet as possible.
  14. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from AlachuaArtist in Moldy canvas   
    Make a bleach solution and wipe it down with a wet sponge and let it dry. The mold may leave stains, but it'll kill it.
  15. Like
    neilestrick reacted to Smokey2 in Pottery Sale Tent?   
    Most excellent explanation.
  16. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Smokey2 in Pottery Sale Tent?   
    The difference in the really cheap ones is that the legs are smaller diameter and thinner metal, and the fittings at all the corners are weaker. I see more EZ-Up go down at shows than other brands of popups.
    There is also a difference in construction between really cheap canopies and others. On really bad ones, the framing  in the top is made of numerous small X pieces, and the cross framing goes from the corners to the center. It's a very weak design. The better ones have two X pieces that make up each side, and the cross X pieces go from the center of each side to the middle, not from the corners. Some companies make both types, so do your research. This photo is the good type:
     

    Like I said, if you're just looking for something to put up while the weather is good at the beach or camping, you can get away with just about anything if you strap the top corners and stake the feet. But if you're going to use it at an event where you'll have to keep it up regardless of the weather- art fair, farmer's market, etc- then invest in something good.
  17. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from DirtRoads in Best way to achieve bright, flat colours (i.e. primary colours)   
    Commercial underglazes have bright colors, and are very easy to use. I use Speedball brand, and with the exception of 2 colors, they hold up very well at cone 6. A lot of people use Amaco Velvets, although I've found more color shifts from them when going to cone 6. As always, you'll need to test whatever you get.
     

  18. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Benzine in Calcine   
    I wonder if bone will grow over those screw ends. Otherwise, yeah, it seems like they would poke and tear on the muscle. The other bone will likely come together, but it would be nice if they lined up better.
    My wife is a veterinarian, and they have a saying about kittens, who have miraculous bone healing skills- "If you put two kitten bones in the same room, they'll grow together."
  19. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from liambesaw in Calcine   
    I wonder if bone will grow over those screw ends. Otherwise, yeah, it seems like they would poke and tear on the muscle. The other bone will likely come together, but it would be nice if they lined up better.
    My wife is a veterinarian, and they have a saying about kittens, who have miraculous bone healing skills- "If you put two kitten bones in the same room, they'll grow together."
  20. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from dpign633 in Need help learning about Pottery, Clay, Glaze, etc.   
    I think that the lecture-only version might not be any better than a good book like Mastering Cone 6 Glazes or John Britt's books. If you really need help understanding written material then you'll need to be able to talk to someone. $500 is pricey IMO, considering that the video lectures are already made a ready to go and you'll be supplying your own materials to test. I charge about $250 for an 8 week course where everything is hands-on and we're mixing tests every week and I'm answering questions non stop. That said, there aren't many options for glaze formulation classes, so you might be stuck with that. I'd start with a good book first, and see if you need additional help. The basics of glaze formulation aren't that difficult, and a lot of it is just familiarity with glaze materials. Once you can identify what each ingredient in a glaze is doing, it's relatively simple to tweak glazes to get what you want. There's very little reason to formulate a glaze from scratch nowadays, since there are so many recipes available on the internet. Basic formulation knowledge will make it easy to find something that's close to what you want and adjust it to get it perfect.
  21. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Benzine in Calcine   
    If you look closely you can see duct tape in there.
  22. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Smokey2 in Pottery Sale Tent?   
    Most are not water tight. They are water resistant, but for true water-tightness you need canvas that has been coated. Most anything under $600 isn't going to be water tight. However, you can treat them with tent waterproofing, which will do a pretty good job. You have to reapply it regularly, though. If you're just looking for something light and easy for camping, just about anything will work, because once you tie them down from the top corners and stake the feet they're quite stable unless you get really heavy wind and/or rain. I'm a big fan of Caravan Canopies for lightweight canopies. I'm not a fan of the EZ-Up brand. There are a million other brands out there, though. If you're looking for something that's truly strong and waterproof  in a popup canopy, then I recommend the Instant Promotions Pro Expo. It'll be about $700 with sidewalls, but it's super beefy- 2" hex legs, all aluminum fittings, and waterproof coated canvas. It's what I use for art fairs. It's heavy, though. You don't want to carry it very far.
  23. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Pres in Handles snapping in two.   
    You're attaching them too wet. Make the handle, and immediately lay it out in the shape you need. Let it set up until it's just barely still flexible, then attach it to the pot when the pot is as wet as possible.
  24. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from DirtRoads in Pottery Sale Tent?   
    Most are not water tight. They are water resistant, but for true water-tightness you need canvas that has been coated. Most anything under $600 isn't going to be water tight. However, you can treat them with tent waterproofing, which will do a pretty good job. You have to reapply it regularly, though. If you're just looking for something light and easy for camping, just about anything will work, because once you tie them down from the top corners and stake the feet they're quite stable unless you get really heavy wind and/or rain. I'm a big fan of Caravan Canopies for lightweight canopies. I'm not a fan of the EZ-Up brand. There are a million other brands out there, though. If you're looking for something that's truly strong and waterproof  in a popup canopy, then I recommend the Instant Promotions Pro Expo. It'll be about $700 with sidewalls, but it's super beefy- 2" hex legs, all aluminum fittings, and waterproof coated canvas. It's what I use for art fairs. It's heavy, though. You don't want to carry it very far.
  25. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Magnolia Mud Research in Need help learning about Pottery, Clay, Glaze, etc.   
    I think that the lecture-only version might not be any better than a good book like Mastering Cone 6 Glazes or John Britt's books. If you really need help understanding written material then you'll need to be able to talk to someone. $500 is pricey IMO, considering that the video lectures are already made a ready to go and you'll be supplying your own materials to test. I charge about $250 for an 8 week course where everything is hands-on and we're mixing tests every week and I'm answering questions non stop. That said, there aren't many options for glaze formulation classes, so you might be stuck with that. I'd start with a good book first, and see if you need additional help. The basics of glaze formulation aren't that difficult, and a lot of it is just familiarity with glaze materials. Once you can identify what each ingredient in a glaze is doing, it's relatively simple to tweak glazes to get what you want. There's very little reason to formulate a glaze from scratch nowadays, since there are so many recipes available on the internet. Basic formulation knowledge will make it easy to find something that's close to what you want and adjust it to get it perfect.
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