Jump to content

neilestrick

Moderators
  • Content Count

    9,434
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Reputation Activity

  1. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Hulk in Thomas Stuart Wheel screeching   
    I've never had a Skutt wheel bearing screech. Typically they thump and bump when they wear out. But every wheel is unique. If you're sure it's coming from the bearing, then get a new bearing block from Skutt or a reputable distributor. The bearings are set into a machined aluminum cylindrical block that's attached to the wheel with the 5 screws you see under the wheel head. It's not a difficult job to replace the bearing, assuming the shaft will come out. It may take some soaking with lubricant to get it to come loose.
  2. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from grumpykidstudio in Running a 28 Amp kiln on a 30 Amp breaker   
    If he knows that the 30 amp breaker is not up to code for that kiln and he's still okay with it, find another electrician.
  3. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from grumpykidstudio in Running a 28 Amp kiln on a 30 Amp breaker   
    Not good. National electric code says that kilns must be on a circuit that is 25% greater than the draw of the kiln. So 28 amps goes to 35, and then you just go up to the closest actual breaker size, which would be a 40. At some point there's a good chance that you'll trip the 30 amp breaker, especially if you get new elements. You'll also be putting a lot of strain on the outlet, wires,  and breaker since they're running continuously at close to their max allowable amperage. And if there's ever a fire due to the kiln, having it not wired up to code could be an issue with your insurance company.
    Why can't you change out the breaker?
    Many 18x18 interior kilns pull 24 amps, which requires a 30 amp breaker.
  4. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Marcia Selsor in Cone 5 plus hold = Cone 6 ?   
    I used to fire to cone 8 by going to 6 with a 40 minute hold, and it worked well. It increased my element life by about 25%, too. I tested soaking cone 4 to get to 6 and it took about an hour. Some of my cone 6 glazes worked fine, but some did not like it at all. They needed more heat, not heatwork. The glazes that worked with the long soak tended to be higher in frits, which melt early. Those that were higher in feldspars and low in frit didn't do well at all.
  5. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Bill Kielb in Metal bit in element holder   
    There are no screws in the kiln that would go that far through. There are also no pins or screws or anything that hold the element holders in place- they just slide into grooves in the brick.
    I'd say that's a glob of element metal and ceramic holder and maybe brick that has melted into a glob. I've seen elements and holders melt out like that before. If you don't have a replacement holder, then just grind out that area and put a new element in.
  6. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from RobustEnergies in Why is manual kiln "medium" setting at 4 instead of 6?   
    It think it's probably like Bill said and it's not that each number is equally spaced from 0 to 100. I wouldn't worry about it, though, just find what works for you and use the numbers as a repeatable reference point.
  7. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Bill Kielb in Why is manual kiln "medium" setting at 4 instead of 6?   
    It think it's probably like Bill said and it's not that each number is equally spaced from 0 to 100. I wouldn't worry about it, though, just find what works for you and use the numbers as a repeatable reference point.
  8. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Bill Kielb in Duncan Kiln sitter LT3K not getting hot enough   
    I don't think Paragon made them, they just took over the servicing of them when Duncan stopped making them.
    Paragon has very few parts left in inventory, so Euclids.com is probably the best bet for getting elements.
  9. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from liambesaw in Intro/Porcelain question   
    Porcelain takes in water quickly. You have to get it centered and pulled up quickly, and then you can take your time with shaping if you scrape the moisture off the exterior with a metal rib. It also gives up water quickly, so forms like wide bowls are always a struggle because the lip will dry so quickly compared to the middle. But if you need to speed dry something in the kiln, porcelain will dry out in half the time of a smooth white stoneware.
  10. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Marcia Selsor in Intro/Porcelain question   
    For those 7 foot tall pots we all make. 230 amps on single phase power! It probably runs on 480V 3P though.
  11. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Marcia Selsor in Intro/Porcelain question   
    L&L makes their Jupiter series available as a pull-apart kiln, where each section plugs into a freestanding control box. They also do some big industrial kilns like that, too:
     

  12. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Marcia Selsor in Intro/Porcelain question   
    B-Mix and other smooth white stoneware bodies are nothing like porcelain. They are smooth, and whiter than brown bodies, but that's where the similarities end. White stoneware bodies are made primarily of ball clays, which a good porcelain will not have (yes, I'm a porcelain purity snob).
    Working big with porcelain has a lot of potential issues. First, the shrinkage rate is higher, so you have to make things bigger to end up with the finished size you want. Second, it dries much faster, and fast drying is a problem with thick pieces because the walls won't dry evenly unless you dry them very, very slowly. Third, it doesn't hold shape as well as a groggy stoneware during forming. Fourth, it'll want to slump under its own weight in the glaze firing if it's too thin. Fifth, it absorbs water very quickly so you have to work quickly, which can be difficult if you're working large. Sixth, it has very poor dry strength so it's more difficult to move large pieces into the kiln.
    All that said, you can make large pieces with it, but you have to know the material and understand its limitations and be willing to take longer to do them and accept a higher loss rate. I've done many 50 pound planters with a cone 6 grolleg porcelain (Standard 365) and they came out great. But it would have been a lot faster and easier to do them with stoneware. The thing is, there is no benefit to using porcelain for really large pieces. You're not going to make them thin enough to be translucent, so just throw them out of stoneware and cover them with porcelain slip if you want them to be white.
  13. Like
    neilestrick reacted to liambesaw in Intro/Porcelain question   
    Holy guacamole look at that sucker
  14. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Catatonic in Help with using a Duncan Automatic Teacher-Plus Kiln   
    The switch isn't really setting firing profiles like a digital controller would. It's just a regular manual infinite switch that they've labeled as though it were an actual controller. At each setting it's going to cycle the elements on and off at a different rate to control how hot the kiln can get at each setting. The Overglaze setting is roughly the same as putting it the switch on medium, and since overglazes fire at such a low temperature it'll get hot enough on medium to do the job. The Ceramics setting is like medium-high, and will allow the kiln to get hot enough for low fire work. The High-Fire setting is full on, which is needed for cone 6 work. They way they tell you to fire it is to just put it on one of those settings, which means it goes on low for two hours and then jumps up to the setting. We don't generally fire our kilns like that, though, because it fires too quickly that way. Instead, we go through a series of turn-ups to increase the temperature slowly so that we don't harm our pots by heating too quickly or getting incomplete burnout or melting the glazes too fast. So ignore the labels on the switch and instead think of it as low to high, and do a series of turnups.
  15. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Catatonic in Help with using a Duncan Automatic Teacher-Plus Kiln   
    @Catatonic The switch is just an infinite switch. According to the Duncan manual, when you turn it on, it will go on low for 2 hours, then switch over to whatever cycle you've set the dial to. Overglaze is like medium, Ceramic is like med-high, High Fire is full on. Try this: start with the switch off, push the power button on the sitter, turn the switch to Overglaze and let it go 4 hours, then switch to Ceramic for 4 hours, then to High Fire until it's done. It may shut off on the ceramic setting.
  16. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from ango0211 in Buying Used Shimpo Cone Art Kiln - Model BX2827D - good idea?   
    Shimpo has (had?) a line called ConeArt. Not sure what the connection is to Tucker's, if they're just branding them or what. Can't get the Shimpo website to load this morning.
    @ango0211 If the wall bricks, floor, and lid are all in good condition, and the price is right, it'll be a good kiln. The Bartlett controller is the same circuit board as the Skutt contoller, but Skutt has simplified the touchpad a bit. If you can use a Skutt you can use a Bartlett.
  17. Like
    neilestrick reacted to TheresaB in EA-820 The Teacher Plus kiln sitter problem   
    Thank you Neil. I will try the paper method over the next few days and let you know the results. Thank you very much for your help.
  18. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from TheresaB in EA-820 The Teacher Plus kiln sitter problem   
    Use the paper method to make sure all the elements are working. If one or more are out, then either the element is dead or there's a problem with a connection in the control box. If they are all working and it didn't get to temp in the usual time frame, then they are worn and maybe need to be replaced. I'd try a slower firing first to see how it does. The best way to check the elements is to measure the element resistance with a mulit-meter. Most kiln brands have video instructions on how to do that on their web sites.
    Remember that the timer has nothing to do with how long the firing takes, it just turns the kiln off when the timer hits zero. You'll have to adjust the timer accordingly for a longer firing, which means doing a firing or two to figure out how long it's going to take, and then setting the timer for about 1/2 hour longer.
  19. Like
    neilestrick reacted to liambesaw in Cultural appropriation in pottery: a question   
    Not really a racial pedigree, is it?  It's more of a culture of which you're a member.  There are actually laws surrounding this in the United States when it comes to native culture.  And I think these have been law since the 1970s, so it's not really a new or progressive thing.
    If you have spent time learning and participating in a culture, you have quite a bit of latitude, mostly because you're being true to cultural traditions.  Has nothing to do with race, and saying something like that is purposefully inflammatory.  Just look at bernard leach, born and raised in Asia (Hong Kong/japan), returned to japan to teach, stayed to take up pottery and study under potters there and take part in that culture.  Is he considered a culture thief? No, he's considered a cultural ambassador and I think there's quite a bit of difference.  The honest gripe some people have is when they replicate with no knowledge, no acknowledgement of the culture and no care.  You know these people, I know these people, and while it doesn't offend me, I do think it's a bit ridiculous.
    Just saw today someone post pictures of "yunomi".  Just call it a cup, what's the point of using the Japanese word, other than marketing or making it exotic?  Is it more descriptive than "tumbler"? Are you planning to sell them in Japan?  It's not bad to ask these questions of yourself when borrowing from other cultures.
  20. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from TheresaB in EA-820 The Teacher Plus kiln sitter problem   
    Did it heat up at all? Does it have the Manual/Automatic switch? If so, set it to manual and turn it on at the High Fire setting. Let it run for a while and carefully crack the lid and see if the elements are glowing. Alternatively, put a little piece of paper on each element and turn it on at the High Fire setting. Let it run for a bit, then turn off the kiln and see if the little pieces of paper have burned at all. If it does not have the Manual/Automatic setting, it may take a while before the paper burns. You can usually hear a buzzing if the elements are getting power.
    5 hours is really fast for a firing. Check out THIS THREAD that is currently happening for some ideas on slowing down the firing. It would be good to get the firings p to 8 hours or more.
     
  21. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Bill Kielb in Help with using a Duncan Automatic Teacher-Plus Kiln   
    @Catatonic The switch is just an infinite switch. According to the Duncan manual, when you turn it on, it will go on low for 2 hours, then switch over to whatever cycle you've set the dial to. Overglaze is like medium, Ceramic is like med-high, High Fire is full on. Try this: start with the switch off, push the power button on the sitter, turn the switch to Overglaze and let it go 4 hours, then switch to Ceramic for 4 hours, then to High Fire until it's done. It may shut off on the ceramic setting.
  22. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Stephen in 4 month lead time on new kilns...   
    Before you buy- have you looked at the Genesis controller or Quad element upgrades, and does the Clay-King kiln have them? I highly recommend both. The Genesis is a cheap upgrade and has a lot more functionality than the Dynatrol- it's much easier to use for custom programs, has a lot more diagnostic features, connects to wi-fi for software upgrades, and has an app for monitoring firings when you're away from your kiln. The Quad element design will almost double the element life, thus paying for itself and reducing maintenance time/costs.
    Remember that your kiln will last 20-30 years or more with proper care. Don't rush into getting somethings that's not exactly what you want.
  23. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Scott.lee in Kiln Question and Appraisal   
    A new kiln will last you 20-30+ years, so if you have the funds it's a worthwhile investment. Otherwise, keep looking, something will turn up eventually.
  24. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Scott.lee in Kiln Question and Appraisal   
    @Scott.lee If you plan to fire to cone 6, don't buy it. It maxes out at cone 6, which means you'll only get to cone 6 if your elements are in perfect condition, which means you'll only get about 25-35 firings before they need to be changed. By contrast, a cone 10 kiln will go up to 150 firings on a set of elements. You want a kiln that can got to cone 8 minimum, cone 10 ideally.
    The other issue with this kiln is that the Sitter doesn't have a backup timer, so it's not as safe as it could be in terms of shutting off when you want it to. And the control boxes on that model are narrower and the sitter is built differently than modern boxes so you can't just put in a new sitter without changing all 3 boxes.
    18" wide kilns are also very limiting unless you only make narrow or small items. You can't fit a serving bowl in it, and there's a lot of wasted space when firing smaller bowls. They're good for mugs, but not wider pieces. I'd wait for a 23" wide kiln as it will give you a lot more options on what forms you can fire.
    I also think that $700 is too high, and you're going to need to buy more shelves and more posts.
  25. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Andere in Messing with geology in glazes?   
    If you have the numbers on the heavy metals that are found in the raw materials in your area, then you could compare those to the allowable limits in a certified non-toxic clay body. If it exceeds those limits, I'd pass on using them.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.