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neilestrick

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  1. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Callie Beller Diesel in Tall vase bends at cone 6 glaze fire   
    @Farideh Warpage is common when working with slabs. Make sure you're rolling the slabs in multiple directions- roll a little bit, turn, roll a little bit, turn, etc. Don't roll it down to thickness all in one direction or the clay particles will align in that one direction and be more likely to warp during glaze firing.
    Personally, I don't consider the warpage in that piece to be a failure. Perfection is not necessary, imperfection adds character.
  2. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from DirtRoads in Anyone getting grants or SBA loans?   
    I thankfully did not need loans to get through our 11 week shutdown, however I did qualify for unemployment, which paid my bills at my shop and put a small amount in my pocket. I don't have any employees, so I would have had to pay back a PPP loan. Last year was a good year so I had enough cash on hand to get through the shutdown before unemployment finally came through.
  3. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Chilly in Porcelain Shrinkage   
    It's best, especially with porcelain, to join all the pieces when they're at the same moisture level. If you attach a soft slab to a leather hard box you'll likely have cracking issues.
  4. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Hulk in Advice on repairing a kiln   
    You'll need to replace any bricks that have element grooves that are broken more than an inch. Definitely the bottom row where the whole groove it gone. Bricks run about $14.50  each depending on which ones you need. There are straight brick (2 straight grooves), peep brick (have the peep hole), terminal brick (have the angled groove), and the sitter brick (kiln sitter tube goes through it). Pull the elements, replace the brick, put in the new elements. Also take a look at the wiring. If any of it is turning brown or getting crispy when you bend it, replace it. There's the wiring harness, which is all the wires from the sitter to the switches, and the feeder wires, which are the wires from the switches to the elements.
    Don't worry about removing the rust. You could go over it with some fine steel wool, but it's not an issue unless it's rusting through, in which case you'll need to replace the band.
    The serial plate says 1 phase, I think Mark misread it. It says it was originally set up for 208 volt service. If you're using it in your home, you'll have 240 volt service, so you'll have to be sure to get 240 volt elements. It says it'll pul 26.7 amps, so it should be on a 40 amp circuit.
    The blank ring (the middle ring without elements) will lower the peak firing temp of the kiln to cone 1, so if you plan to fire anything above low fire temps you'll have to remove it.
  5. Like
    neilestrick reacted to Mark C. in Movable Minnesota flat-top style kiln   
    Maybe the Hulk to help roll it
  6. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Babs in Porcelain Shrinkage   
    It's best, especially with porcelain, to join all the pieces when they're at the same moisture level. If you attach a soft slab to a leather hard box you'll likely have cracking issues.
  7. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from JohnnyK in Tabletop studio lighting   
    Get something that allows you to use regular screw-in bulbs, like the second one on your list, and also get two clamp-on reflector lights that you can clamp onto those tripods. 4 bulbs will light better than two, so you can light high and low. Then get 15-20 watt LED bulbs, which are equivalent to 100 watt incandescent bulbs. You can adjust how intense they are by how closely you set them to the cube.
  8. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Hulk in Tabletop studio lighting   
    Get something that allows you to use regular screw-in bulbs, like the second one on your list, and also get two clamp-on reflector lights that you can clamp onto those tripods. 4 bulbs will light better than two, so you can light high and low. Then get 15-20 watt LED bulbs, which are equivalent to 100 watt incandescent bulbs. You can adjust how intense they are by how closely you set them to the cube.
  9. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Callie Beller Diesel in Boiling water causes sandy feeling outside   
    The clay is under-fired, so it's not vitrified/still porous and allowing the tea to seep through. If you know who made it, I would contact them and ask for a replacement or refund. Chances are everything they make is from that same clay body, so they'll all have the same problem.
  10. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from yss in Boiling water causes sandy feeling outside   
    The clay is under-fired, so it's not vitrified/still porous and allowing the tea to seep through. If you know who made it, I would contact them and ask for a replacement or refund. Chances are everything they make is from that same clay body, so they'll all have the same problem.
  11. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Hulk in Paragon Electric Kiln A-66   
    @Newby Carol On low and medium it probably won't get hot enough to see cones inside. Put it on high and carefully crack the lid after a few minutes with the lights off and see if all the elements are glowing. If they all glow, then go ahead and do a bisque firing and see how it goes. 
  12. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from JessicaStadtmueller in Covid -19 Cleanliness   
    It's not as simple as throwing the clay into a pot and heating it up. It needs to be done in a way that doesn't allow water to evaporate off, or else you'll also have to be rehydrating and wedging it. Freezing is not a good way to kill viruses, and would not be good for the clay anyway. The simplest method would be to have enough clay on hand that once someone uses it, you leave it alone for 3 days before using it again, as the virus can only live for 2-3 days outside a body.
    IMO, the students going to get more contact with the virus everywhere else in the shool- railings, door knobs, desk tops, etc. Plus they're far more likely to get it from airborne droplets. Surface contamination is not the primary method through which the virus spreads, and you have to touch your mouth or eyes for it to be a problem. Just have them wash hands before and after starting clay work.
  13. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Newby Carol in Paragon Electric Kiln A-66   
    @Newby Carol On low and medium it probably won't get hot enough to see cones inside. Put it on high and carefully crack the lid after a few minutes with the lights off and see if all the elements are glowing. If they all glow, then go ahead and do a bisque firing and see how it goes. 
  14. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Newby Carol in Paragon Electric Kiln A-66   
    A basic schedule for a manual kiln is low for 1 hour, medium for one hour, high until done. Without a sitter you'll need to have a set of cones in there so you can shut it off at the correct time. Can you post a picture of the kiln so we can see the controls?
  15. Like
    neilestrick reacted to chantalqtal in firing a fitted lid   
    hi, I never thanked for the help received. the wax alumina resist works very well!
  16. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Pres in firing a fitted lid   
    The alumina keeps the raw clay areas from fusing together, which they will do if you're firing the clay to full maturity. The wax allows you to apply the alumina, and works as a resist when glazing.
    Always fire lids and their pots together so they don't warp.
  17. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Benzine in Kiln building help   
    If you're using hard brick, which you should be using on the interior of a salt or wood kiln, you'll want to use a mortar of fireclay and sand. If you're also using soft brick for the exterior, you'll need to mortar those, too, to keep everything even.
  18. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Chilly in Applying Kiln Wash   
    If it soaks into the shelf, grind it smooth and put some kiln wash on it. Don't put pots in that spot. Regrind and reapply kiln wash after each firing. After a couple of firings the glaze will stop absorbing the kiln wash and you'll be good to go to use that spot again.
  19. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Pres in Virtual Markets   
    I think that whether or not an online show will be successful depends entirely on how email focused the show is. If they maintain a large email list of show attendees, then they can maybe get the word out to enough people to make it worthwhile. But I think that for most shows, the artists probably have better email lists than the show itself does. If the artists all pool their email lists and get the word out, it could be decent because you could benefit from the other artists' lists. However it's difficult to sell pots to people that haven't touched your work in real life, so the benefit may not be great. I think that by and large you would probably do just as well having your own personal online sale, especially if the show is wanting to charge the regular booth fee that they would for an outdoor show. I have said no to most shows this year that were offering on online fair, because they wanted me to pay the regular $350ish booth fee. For one, their costs for running an online show wouldn't be anywhere near as much as holding the actual outdoor show, so it's greedy. Second, I doubt that that 10,000+ people are going to attend the online sale like they would the outdoor show.
  20. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Bill Kielb in Running a 208v single phase kiln at 240v   
    Because of the difference in the resistance of the elements, if you run 208 volt elements on 240 volts you'll be pulling more amperage, which can be a problem. For instance, a kiln pulling 48 amps on 208 volt service will pull about 55 amps on 240 volt service. That means the 60 amp breaker is no longer within code.
  21. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Hulk in Corelite shelves...need Advice   
    I have customers that use the 26" Corelite in their e28 kilns and they work fine. The typical shelves are 25 1/2", so you're only losing 1/4" on each side. Plus with half shelves you can overlap them slightly if you're staggering the shelves. 
  22. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Chilly in Throwing big   
    These are some porcelain planters I did a few years back. They're about 45 pounds each. To give you an idea of the size, they are sitting on 13in bats. The base is thrown as a 7 pound disc that covers the whole bat, with a short lip that sticks up about an inch. Then I take a bag of clay (25lbs), cut it in half, and throw two cylinders about 3/4 inch thick. They are stacked onto the bottom slab, and the whole thing is pulled up and shaped.  This is all done at once, while everything is still wet. No drying of any pieces. I do not score when joining them, because it makes little air bubbles in the joint that are visible after pulling. Just make sure the joint is dry and they'll stick fine. I use a metal rib to scrape down the surfaces and get the slurry off. Pulling the walls gets everything joined securely. That forms the bottom 2/3 of the pot, up to the ridge that you see in the pot. I just leave the lip thick to create the ridge, which gives me a wide surface to attach the next ring. I let all of that stiffen up a little bit, then throw another half a bag into a ring, attach it to the top of the pot, pull and shape. I do score that joint since the two pieces are different moisture levels, and because I'm not pulling through the joint there's no air bubble problem.

  23. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Benzine in Throwing big   
    These are some porcelain planters I did a few years back. They're about 45 pounds each. To give you an idea of the size, they are sitting on 13in bats. The base is thrown as a 7 pound disc that covers the whole bat, with a short lip that sticks up about an inch. Then I take a bag of clay (25lbs), cut it in half, and throw two cylinders about 3/4 inch thick. They are stacked onto the bottom slab, and the whole thing is pulled up and shaped.  This is all done at once, while everything is still wet. No drying of any pieces. I do not score when joining them, because it makes little air bubbles in the joint that are visible after pulling. Just make sure the joint is dry and they'll stick fine. I use a metal rib to scrape down the surfaces and get the slurry off. Pulling the walls gets everything joined securely. That forms the bottom 2/3 of the pot, up to the ridge that you see in the pot. I just leave the lip thick to create the ridge, which gives me a wide surface to attach the next ring. I let all of that stiffen up a little bit, then throw another half a bag into a ring, attach it to the top of the pot, pull and shape. I do score that joint since the two pieces are different moisture levels, and because I'm not pulling through the joint there's no air bubble problem.

  24. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Bill Kielb in Bartlett V6-CF install on Paragon A82B   
    The existing control box is not set up for a digital controller. It does not have the correct heat baffles, and may not be vented properly. It would be best to build an external control box, either mounted to the kiln itself or mounted to the wall. I prefer wall mounted because the box stays cooler and the parts last longer. You could also use the box for other kilns in the future. Do you know how to hook up the controller with relays, transformer, etc?
  25. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from CactusPots in Throwing big   
    These are some porcelain planters I did a few years back. They're about 45 pounds each. To give you an idea of the size, they are sitting on 13in bats. The base is thrown as a 7 pound disc that covers the whole bat, with a short lip that sticks up about an inch. Then I take a bag of clay (25lbs), cut it in half, and throw two cylinders about 3/4 inch thick. They are stacked onto the bottom slab, and the whole thing is pulled up and shaped.  This is all done at once, while everything is still wet. No drying of any pieces. I do not score when joining them, because it makes little air bubbles in the joint that are visible after pulling. Just make sure the joint is dry and they'll stick fine. I use a metal rib to scrape down the surfaces and get the slurry off. Pulling the walls gets everything joined securely. That forms the bottom 2/3 of the pot, up to the ridge that you see in the pot. I just leave the lip thick to create the ridge, which gives me a wide surface to attach the next ring. I let all of that stiffen up a little bit, then throw another half a bag into a ring, attach it to the top of the pot, pull and shape. I do score that joint since the two pieces are different moisture levels, and because I'm not pulling through the joint there's no air bubble problem.

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