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shawnhar

Reputation for selling cheap pottery

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Also, in regards to selling your work, as  a beginner, if it is functional, safe to use, etc I don't see a problem with it. 

We are all growing as artists.  Not only have our skills developed over time, but so have our taste.  Forms and glazes, that we may have liked, at one time, might not interest us anymore.  The same is true for any artist, in any media; Painters, photographers, designers, etc.  This doesn't mean that earlier work is worthless.  So if your work is well made (No cracks, horribly uneven spots, overly thick) and you've got a proper glaze on it, by all means, sell away. 

As Mea said, she has family with some of her earlier work, that she would rather "Didn't exist anymore".  I too have some out there.  They are all gifts, but that doesn't diminish my distaste for them.  I can happily report, that a few of them were liberated from my Grandparent's, when I helped during a move...

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On 4/20/2018 at 6:19 PM, GEP said:

$30,000/year with $5 pots is 6000 pots per year. Is that realistic?

I make about 2000 pots per year, and trying to lower that number this year to be easier on my body.

@Mark C. might be making 6000 pots per year, but keep in mind he’s been doing this for 40 years. That kind of speed and skill cannot be gained quickly. 

I hate to say this but its more than the 6,000 per year-yesterday was my easy day -I counted the stuff just to see what an easy day was.

fire two glaze fires threw 24 square chopstick bowls and trimmed them

Did 3 square slab plates-finished them with the suns heat

30 sponge holders cut and finished-extruded 25 soap dishes -sponged and holed them

did a fair amount of misc outside studio as well

see if I counted this stuff I would go nuts

Edited by Mark C.

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That's awesome Mark. I'd be thrilled at this point just to throw 20 "anythings" in one day. (Pretty sure I could throw 20 bowls, but also pretty sure I would not be proud of them, lol)

 How did you dry the feet enough to trim the same day you threw?

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On ‎4‎/‎20‎/‎2018 at 8:19 PM, GEP said:

$30,000/year with $5 pots is 6000 pots per year. Is that realistic?

I make about 2000 pots per year, and trying to lower that number this year to be easier on my body.

@Mark C. might be making 6000 pots per year, but keep in mind he’s been doing this for 40 years. That kind of speed and skill cannot be gained quickly. 

here's the thing I've found.  I also drive for uber and this is easer to understand as an example.  I really only drive on Friday and Saturday nights because that's when I make money.  yes I can drive other days and make enough money to pay for gas and maybe a burger but I would go crazy basically selling my self short.   so point is  maybe you could make $30,000 but all the work you put in to making those 6000 pots  seeing someone sell just one mug for $25 would set you off the deep end.   plus  $30,000/yr would equal $15,000 after all the cost  and how many pots did you make that failed.  all I see for selling for $5 is heart ache  unless you threw 6000 pots they were done fired and you started throwing more and you were like o crap  where am I going to put this new stuff well I guess I'll just sell the old ones.   sell your self for what you would buy you things for if you sell out raise the price.       

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Completely agree and I have no intention of selling anything that cheap and I do't think anyone was actually suggesting it was possible, just pointing out how incredibly difficult it would be.

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8 hours ago, shawnhar said:

That's awesome Mark. I'd be thrilled at this point just to throw 20 "anythings" in one day. (Pretty sure I could throw 20 bowls, but also pretty sure I would not be proud of them, lol)

 How did you dry the feet enough to trim the same day you threw?

I throw porcelain which dries much faster and  more evenly than stoneware. I also throw any pot 8#s and under on plaster bats I made. This dries the foot as fast and even as the lip.

I can throw dry and Trim and dry all on same day if it sunny out.I put the work outside.

if not sunny my shop heater can do the same in same day as well just not as fast.

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On 4/26/2018 at 7:30 PM, Mark C. said:

I throw porcelain which dries much faster and  more evenly than stoneware. I also throw any pot 8#s and under on plaster bats I made. This dries the foot as fast and even as the lip.

I can throw dry and Trim and dry all on same day if it sunny out.I put the work outside.

if not sunny my shop heater can do the same in same day as well just not as fast.

Learning to throw dry (ok, very little water) saves lots of drying time. It also minimizes slop clean-up.

Edited by Rae Reich

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I guess I just see a good pot is a good pot, a second is a good pot that has a small blemish that keeps it from being top shelf and trash is trash. I wouldn't sell or give away junk period. What's the point? if it didn't work, it didn't work. Toss it and move on. it's a part of the journey. No one likes tossing a finished pot but its just the nature of the beast.   

I just recommend ya go get 7-8 tubs and just start building your show inventory. You're going to need a few hundred pots to fill a booth and do a 3 day show. Wrap the the good pots and box them up for your first show and send the near misses to your wife's shop and trash the rest (like we all do). By the time you have 2-300 nice pots for your show inventory you will be making less and less junk and it will all work itself out. I guarantee you that after your first show, no matter how picky you are when you first judge your work, you will have a couple more boxes of pottery for your wife's shop. 

Now having said all that above, I drink out of my very first mug that went all the way through to glazing most days and it is a really, really bad pot that functions extremely well B)

 

 

 

 

  

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shawnhar, you asked how to trim the same day a pot is thrown.  the answer is do not use a ton of water, throw the pot and trim as you finish it.  if your cylinders start out like a ski slope, learn how to get a finger under the edge right at the wheelhead and lift the wall.  save time, effort and frustration by learning how to do it right at the beginning.

 

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