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Qotw:what Is Your Favorite Part Of Your Most Favorite Glaze And Why?

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This weeks question is less philosophic or ephemeral and more on the practical studio side. However, this too could be pretty deep.  So JosephF asks:What is your favorite part of your most favorite glaze and why?

 

 

 

 

 

I have been working towards a white that works on a variety of cone six clays, it comes from an older formula, but with some adjustment of opacifiers, I find that the color and surface works well for me. Originally it was a liner glaze, and I like the fact that it seems to be quite hard, contains enough clay to keep suspended, and goes on smoothly on my bisqueware. Over the years I have worked with a lot of whites, and none have pleased me as much as this one does.

 

 

 

best,

Pres 

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 I like buttery matts for functional ware. When I gave up ^6 reduction in 2000, I reworked some of my favorites.

Dolomite is one of my favorite ingredients because of the magnesium in it that helps with the surface I want as well an influences the color of several oxides especially cobalt and iron.

Marcia

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Thanks for posting my question. I find it interesting what people like about their favorite glaze. Although this might not be as interesting as other QoTW for sure. 

 

Currently my favorite ingredient is Titanium Dioxide. I love white and grey glazes, although I haven't found one that I like 100% yet. The best part about titanium dioxide is that it is a white pigment and it can crystallizes when it slow cools. Which for me is the best of both worlds: creating interesting surfaces over texture and being whiteish.

 

So directly answering my question would be: Visual variety of surface with white and grey tones! 

 

Now that I have answered this QoTW. I think I might have posted a pretty boring question. :blink:

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My favourite glaze is one I can no longer use in a practical way - an amber lead glaze.

What element(s) make this a favourite?

The depth, the limpidity, the luscious honeyed glow which almost oozes from the pot, the colour response over slips - profound qualities which are simply unassailable by any other glaze formulation.

My remaining stocks of lead bisilicate will go on garden pots at some point.

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My current favourite glaze is a dolomite semi gloss glaze. It sparkles, is reliable, and plays well with other glazes and colourants. For me this question is like asking what's your favourite book you've read, I haven’t found it yet. Just have to try one more…..I’m one of those who went down the rabbit hole of glaze testing and am forever doing tests to find THE perfect glaze. Might find it one day but not yet, maybe I’ll get lucky and find the perfect clay at the same time. 

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I'm still looking. I have been using Mastering Cone 6, Waterfall Brown, Which I like very much. But getting good picture of the richness and variances is difficult. I love Earth Tones. But I am going to one day venture out side my comfort zone.

I did use a liner glaze from their book, pg 281, Glossy Clear Liner Glaze with G-200 HP, and added 10% Zircopax and it is the most whitest white I have ever seen. Drys quick, and having trouble with drip lines. I sand down with my finger, but if anyone has a easier way I'd appriciate a clue. Ok, not a clue, but some helpful advice. ;)

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Crystalline glaze is my most favorite and least favorite at the same time. I like it because you never know until the kiln cools, what you are going to get. I dislike it, because you never know until the kiln cools; what you are going to get.

 

My favorite glaze would be molybdenum crystals: but if you think crystalline is tough......

 

Tom

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I like it because you never know until the kiln cools, what you are going to get. I dislike it, because you never know until the kiln cools; what you are going to get.

 

 

I laughed out loud. 

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For me, opening the kiln is like Christmas morning when I was a kid. . . as glazenerd says, you never know what you are going to get, ohhhh, but the anticipation is so sublime!

 

 

 

best,

Pres

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Back in the day, my favorite was a Dague Red (dague means dagger), cone 10. My recipe book has it containing soda ash, Custer spar, whiting, EPK, borax, flint, tin oxide and copper carbonite. yummy-a broken red, very fluid. 

 

Flash forward several decades and I only use cone 6 commercial glazes. I try not to get too seduced by the wannabe look-alikes, like floats, speciality glazes, and such, but I love the vagaries of Amaco's silvery Palladium, the luciousness of Coyote's Turguoise matte, and the quasi crystal-ish affect of Laguna's Crystal Forest. Mostly I like unglazed clay, and pairing that with a glaze on part of the piece, most especially on porcelain. 

 

Post script--Joseph, it's a great question.

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Copper is a worthy opponent as it changes so much due to the way it changes with opacifiers, with atmospheres and overall glaze composition. Another that is finicky to me is Chrome.

 

 

best,

Pres

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Copper is a worthy opponent as it changes so much due to the way it changes with opacifiers, with atmospheres and overall glaze composition. Another that is finicky to me is Chrome.

 

 

best,

Pres

 

When I was in college , I made a set of demi-tess cups in porcelain and the glaze came out a tin pink , I think due to a close- by chrome source in the kiln. Never did duplicate it.  Marcia

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My favourite glaze is one that fired to ^10 reduction iron red, I worked on it for a while testing to use it for ^7 ox. I was finally satisfied with a creamy semi Matt iron speckled glaze that breaks red where thin. I use it up fast as it goes with everything.

Joy

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post-63409-0-05583800-1496850615_thumb.jpgpost-63409-0-92144400-1496850619_thumb.jpgpost-63409-0-96612500-1496850626_thumb.jpgpost-63409-0-09193400-1496850632_thumb.jpg

 

Here are pics of my faves of the moment: Coyote's Turquoise Matte (a small tea light or incense cone holder-unglazed porcelain), the Amaco Palladum (a fancy incense cone holder or single ring display (nice to feature a wedding ring while you're not wearing it, in case you're wondering "what the heck"), and; a shallow tray w/the Laguna Crystal Forest as an edge drip.) I've also recently fallen hard for Coyote's Texas Two-Step (Texas Rose, in the pic) and Amaco's Acai Shino Matte-here they are side-by-side on a little incense cone holder. 

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Marcia,

I used to work to get that Chrome pink blushing on ware. It comes pretty well when using a tin base white with chrome used in some inglaze sprayed on decoration. The flashing is unpredictable, but sometimes you get something in the salmon range that is unbelievably beautiful.

 

best 

Pres

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Chrome Discussion: 

 

For a long time I was thinking about using tubes covered in a chrome fuming glaze beside another cup to fume off on it. I never ended up trying it, but I always wanted to. It is interesting how sometimes you get pots even in electric kilns that do things your not sure where it came from. Maybe the glaze was layered exactly right or the pots near by influenced it or who knows. I have a few pots that I am not sure what happen. Always interesting to look at them and ponder.

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My favorite glaze is Wamo mamo Matt on stoneware.

Our dinnerware is that -I made it all in the 70's and early 80's

I could not make a living selling my favorite glazes 

I still like it the best even though I do not use stoneware and cannot get this look in my porcelain fires.

Its a 70s thing really

Wamo mamo II is a tweeked formule I made for the local collage back in the day-1/2 the tin OX

I'll add a photo soon

 

 

 

post-8914-0-24219200-1497199515_thumb.jpg

post-8914-0-24219200-1497199515_thumb.jpg

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again today i was reminded why i love the green glaze that has been giving me trouble.  when it is good, it is like looking through an unknown depth of transparent green water to see a dragonfly and leaves.  

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Wama-mamo is definitely a 70s kind of glaze. I had some similar. oatmeal, pumpkin, etc. 

That is a dark stoneware for your plates. That too is 70s-ish. You don't get that in an electric normally.

Thanks for posting.

Marcia

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