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Rebekah Krieger

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  1. Like
    Rebekah Krieger got a reaction from Patty_R in Black abrasive substance on wheel   
    Its also possible you are just getting extra grog separating from the clay from over working it on the wheel. I often see new throwers "hold" the clay as it spins.  Try only touching the clay with intention to see if that helps. If not, its probably the older wheel head. 
  2. Like
    Rebekah Krieger got a reaction from Callie Beller Diesel in Black abrasive substance on wheel   
    Its also possible you are just getting extra grog separating from the clay from over working it on the wheel. I often see new throwers "hold" the clay as it spins.  Try only touching the clay with intention to see if that helps. If not, its probably the older wheel head. 
  3. Like
    Rebekah Krieger got a reaction from Pres in Hump molds   
    Bill van guilder has a free video on YouTube or his website on how to make a hump mold. Very simple 
  4. Like
    Rebekah Krieger got a reaction from Hulk in Free Video Recommendations for Potters   
    I love the bill van guilder videos on his website.
    hsin is very relaxing 
    Simon Leach is great with fun classic tips now and then
    tim see has some great videos 
    ceramics monthly has some good uploads on your tube 
     
    also in clay buddies (Facebook) they did a video  series since nceca couldn’t happen.
    Nceca has released some of their videos too 
     
  5. Like
    Rebekah Krieger got a reaction from Roberta12 in Free Video Recommendations for Potters   
    I love the bill van guilder videos on his website.
    hsin is very relaxing 
    Simon Leach is great with fun classic tips now and then
    tim see has some great videos 
    ceramics monthly has some good uploads on your tube 
     
    also in clay buddies (Facebook) they did a video  series since nceca couldn’t happen.
    Nceca has released some of their videos too 
     
  6. Like
    Rebekah Krieger got a reaction from Benzine in Ethics Of Selling Repaired Raku Forms   
    Please pardon my lack of fluff here, but I feel that modern society has perverted the idea of kintsugi to be what it was never intended to be. It was never intended to be a way to repair pots that were made to sell, or to cover mistakes. . It was a way to repair long cherished pots.  
  7. Like
    Rebekah Krieger got a reaction from Chilly in Ethics Of Selling Repaired Raku Forms   
    Please pardon my lack of fluff here, but I feel that modern society has perverted the idea of kintsugi to be what it was never intended to be. It was never intended to be a way to repair pots that were made to sell, or to cover mistakes. . It was a way to repair long cherished pots.  
  8. Like
    Rebekah Krieger got a reaction from Callie Beller Diesel in Ethics Of Selling Repaired Raku Forms   
    Please pardon my lack of fluff here, but I feel that modern society has perverted the idea of kintsugi to be what it was never intended to be. It was never intended to be a way to repair pots that were made to sell, or to cover mistakes. . It was a way to repair long cherished pots.  
  9. Like
    Rebekah Krieger got a reaction from Hulk in Button Holes filling with Glaze   
    I recently read in a ceramics monthly magazine (from the 80’s) to insert broken pieces of pasta (be it spaghetti or something larger) to keep holes open and smooth. 
  10. Like
    Rebekah Krieger got a reaction from LeeU in Ethics Of Selling Repaired Raku Forms   
    Please pardon my lack of fluff here, but I feel that modern society has perverted the idea of kintsugi to be what it was never intended to be. It was never intended to be a way to repair pots that were made to sell, or to cover mistakes. . It was a way to repair long cherished pots.  
  11. Like
    Rebekah Krieger got a reaction from Magnolia Mud Research in Wood Firing Tips   
    When I participated In Simon Levin’s wood firing, I asked the same question. They had a few reliable glazed there for glazing, but with wood firing the form and any surface design will really be magnified with the collection of ash or flashing from the flame path. Most of them look the best with minimal or no glaze at all. I would strongly discourage using a cone 6 glaze, and also a glaze you haven’t fully tested in reduction. Perhaps the person organizing the firing can allow you to experiment with some of the glazes they trust in firing. Adding all of that ash collection with your lower temp glazes could potentially drip down onto other pots. You will also learn more about the firing based on the way the pots look in varying parts of the kiln. 
    The placement of the wads I find to be a fun way to experiment with the flame path and surface decoration. (So no glaze ... you never know what spot that pot will fit and how it will need to be placed) 
     
  12. Like
    Rebekah Krieger got a reaction from Bill Kielb in Wood Firing Tips   
    When I participated In Simon Levin’s wood firing, I asked the same question. They had a few reliable glazed there for glazing, but with wood firing the form and any surface design will really be magnified with the collection of ash or flashing from the flame path. Most of them look the best with minimal or no glaze at all. I would strongly discourage using a cone 6 glaze, and also a glaze you haven’t fully tested in reduction. Perhaps the person organizing the firing can allow you to experiment with some of the glazes they trust in firing. Adding all of that ash collection with your lower temp glazes could potentially drip down onto other pots. You will also learn more about the firing based on the way the pots look in varying parts of the kiln. 
    The placement of the wads I find to be a fun way to experiment with the flame path and surface decoration. (So no glaze ... you never know what spot that pot will fit and how it will need to be placed) 
     
  13. Like
    Rebekah Krieger got a reaction from Bill Kielb in Glaze formula mistake- refire glaze questions   
  14. Like
    Rebekah Krieger got a reaction from Hulk in Wax resist/ water etching, and signatures   
    Thank you for pointing that out. I thought it was beautiful. 
  15. Like
    Rebekah Krieger reacted to Joseph Fireborn in Submit Your Community Challenge Ideas   
    I felt like the results thread was a nice place to see all the work finished, but I also liked seeing the works in progress posted on the actual topic. I feel like the results thread was a lot of extra work for you Joel and we should have just posted our works in progress and final pictures as went in the same place. 
  16. Like
    Rebekah Krieger got a reaction from dricherson in Submit Your Community Challenge Ideas   
    ancient theme (various era)
     
    clay hero inspired piece 
  17. Like
    Rebekah Krieger reacted to neilestrick in Turned Foot Rings On Mugs; Elegance Or Affectation?   
    It's a balance between spending enough time making your pots that they are beautiful enough that someone wants to buy them, but not so much time that you waste time doing things that the market won't pay for. I have some designs that make for really great pots, but I can't get enough money for them at art fairs to make it worth my time to produce them. I get $26 for mugs, and at that price I can trim a foot on them.
  18. Like
    Rebekah Krieger got a reaction from TallTayl in Turned Foot Rings On Mugs; Elegance Or Affectation?   
    Warren mackanzie explains well what I am trying to say at 5:00 - 6
  19. Like
    Rebekah Krieger got a reaction from LeeU in Turned Foot Rings On Mugs; Elegance Or Affectation?   
    Warren mackanzie explains well what I am trying to say at 5:00 - 6
  20. Like
    Rebekah Krieger reacted to rayaldridge in Turned Foot Rings On Mugs; Elegance Or Affectation?   
    Rebekah, I can certainly understand that point of view, since for most of my life I held a very similar one.
     
    But... I have to disagree with the implication that a beer stein can't be great art.  There are very ordinary functional pots that are in my opinion greater works of art than any number of works made with the intention of creating art.  A good example is the Song Dynasty rice bowl, of which millions were made by anonymous potters.  Some of them are staggeringly beautiful, and in my view unmatched by almost everything made by studio potters in the last century or so.
     
    Anyway, now that I'm in my dotage, I've resolved to make everything that comes from my kilns as beautiful as possible, given my limited skills... even the humblest of forms.
     
    That doesn't mean that I don't care about whether or not a form can be made profitably.  I do.  In fact, my thinking about the mugs involves certain financial considerations.  My mugs are porcelain.  Porcelain wares have certain connotations and contexts that make it reasonable to apply a more careful degree of finish than might be the case with stoneware.  People expect a certain boldness and spontaneity with stoneware, but with porcelain, they expect refinement.  (Of course, there's nothing wrong with confounding expectations.)
     
    The amount of time it takes to turn a foot on these mugs is not enormous, especially with the right equipment and an efficient set-up.  I think I can ask and get more for these mugs than I could for mugs finished flat on the wheel.  I believe the couple of minutes it takes to turn the feet will be adequately repaid, though of course I could be wrong.  The initial reaction I'm getting is encouraging.
     
    But perhaps more important than any financial consideration is that I'm really proud of these mugs, I look forward to making them, decorating them, firing them, and that makes it more fun to crank them out.  I'm inclined to make more of them than if I were regarding them as something I had to make in order to pay the rent.
     
    I guess what I'm trying to get across here is that making a decent living with functional wares is not easy, even if you are very skilled. For folks who aren't really interested in making mugs for their own sake, they might be better off working at McDonalds, and spending their actual studio time on the forms they really want to make.
     
    This is in no way a disagreement with what you said.  It's more in the line of explaining why I'm doing what I'm doing.
  21. Like
    Rebekah Krieger reacted to Benzine in Submit Your Community Challenge Ideas   
    I made some suggestions in the original thread.  Some type of theme, like "Nature" or "Technology".  Or since it's the first contest, we could do a "My Style" or "Self-Portrait".  It would just be making something that describes you, not an actual depiction of yourself... unless of course that is your style.
  22. Like
    Rebekah Krieger got a reaction from neilestrick in Hot Wax For Bottoms Of Pots?   
    Hot wax, but not for pottery. I use wax resist... 
  23. Like
    Rebekah Krieger reacted to Tarheeler in Potter/ceramicist: Pottery/ceramics?   
    I'd say that I'm a potter and I make pots. 
     
    It doesn't preclude me from making pots that are art, and I can fill that role as well, but I'm good with potter. My day job for the last 15 years has been making, installing, and fixing things, and I feel there is a lot of value in titles like craftsman, artisan, and tradesman. If they have lost value in society's eyes, in then it up to us to change that.
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