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dhPotter

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  1. Like
    dhPotter got a reaction from offmenu in Troubleshooting white glaze, please help   
    If you are out of F4, use Minspar 200 instead of subbing with Neph Sy. 
  2. Like
    dhPotter reacted to Min in What makes this glaze tick?   
    I think you are making it more complicated than it needs to be for a simple colour test. Weigh out 100 grams of base then add the percentage of colourants you want to test. If you are going to test just one colourant at a time just do a simple progression test where you increase the amount of just the one colourant. For example, 100 base glaze + 5 titanium dioxide + 2 bentonite + 0.25 cobalt carbonate (just for example). Mix it up, sieve it then dip a test tile. Now add another 0.25 cobalt and dip another test tile, repeat up to 2 total of cobalt carbonate. This way one test batch will give you 8 shades of cobalt blue.
    I would actually add the titanium and bentonite to your base so you don't have to weigh it out for each colour test, your base glaze for colourant testing would then weigh 107. For a fairly extended colourant test like the cobalt blue example above I would double your base (and double the colourant) so you have enough glaze slurry to work with. Each test is going to be slightly off as you are decreasing the base amount of glaze with each dip but it will get you in the ballpark.
    Rutile can make a lovely tan /gold coloured glaze, could be worth testing the base with that in place of the titanium dioxide. To get the same amount of titanium in the glaze bump the rutile to 5.5
    After you get this sorted you could try a 2 colourant blend or a triaxial, they more complicated but will give you a palette of blended colourants. Reason this is sometimes worth doing is because some colourants (like cobalt) can look better when modified slightly with some iron or manganese. 
    (BTW, I removed your extraneous posts where you were having problems attaching the image)
     
     
  3. Like
    dhPotter reacted to Piedmont Pottery in Reclaim Tray / Pottery Plaster or Plaster of Paris?   
    I'm a big fan of backer board, both as a wedging surface and for quickly drying out slop.  They're readily available, inexpensive, and no worries about getting bits of plaster in your clay.
  4. Like
    dhPotter got a reaction from Roberta12 in Standing to throw   
    @Bam2015 As you can see my floor, and everything else, is not as clean as Min
    When I sit down the top of the seat is even with the top of the splash pan. I like this position because my hips and knees are nearly in a stand up position. I can lean my shoulders and upper body over the clay for centering. When leaning over the wheel and looking down at the wheel my eyes are looking about 1 inch past the wheel's center.
     


  5. Like
    dhPotter got a reaction from Min in Standing to throw   
    @Bam2015 As you can see my floor, and everything else, is not as clean as Min
    When I sit down the top of the seat is even with the top of the splash pan. I like this position because my hips and knees are nearly in a stand up position. I can lean my shoulders and upper body over the clay for centering. When leaning over the wheel and looking down at the wheel my eyes are looking about 1 inch past the wheel's center.
     


  6. Like
    dhPotter got a reaction from Babs in Standing to throw   
    @Roberta12 Yes the cinder blocks are sturdy - I have 1 under each leg of my Brent C. Also have a half block, 4 inches instead of 8 inches under my Left foot with a 2 inch paver under the Right foot which also has the foot pedal. I had hip replacement on my Right side 5 years ago - one of the best surgeries I ever had. I have one of those Speed Ball potters chairs that I replaced the pneumatic tube with a bar stool height tube. When sitting at the wheel my legs are almost straight. 
  7. Like
    dhPotter got a reaction from Roberta12 in Standing to throw   
    @Roberta12 Yes the cinder blocks are sturdy - I have 1 under each leg of my Brent C. Also have a half block, 4 inches instead of 8 inches under my Left foot with a 2 inch paver under the Right foot which also has the foot pedal. I had hip replacement on my Right side 5 years ago - one of the best surgeries I ever had. I have one of those Speed Ball potters chairs that I replaced the pneumatic tube with a bar stool height tube. When sitting at the wheel my legs are almost straight. 
  8. Like
    dhPotter reacted to Roberta12 in Does anyone have a picture of a crazed piece of pottery after years of use?   
    @Bailey_rae_clay I keep my crazed pieces in my cupboard as well.  Or give them to family who understand what is going on.  I have switched glazes and clays in order to find clay bodies that work for me and glazes that work for me.  And even when you think you have it dialed in, you don't.  Stuff happens and you might spend a lonnngggg time trying to diagnose whether it was the clay, the glaze, change of materials, something with your kiln.  The very best piece of advice I got when I started was "there are no precious pots"  I took that to heart.  I am not afraid to wield a hammer like Thor on subpar work.  Or as @Hulk mentioned...they can become planters.  There is a sense of satisfaction when you can diagnose a problem and continue research and development in order to overcome.  It sounds so fricking boring to hear one after another say  "test test test" but that is the absolute truth and the only way to gather information.  Best of luck to you....know that we have alll been there and will perhaps go there again. 
    Roberta
  9. Like
    dhPotter reacted to shawnhar in Finally, getting a "real" studio!   
    But wait, it is even better... The door in the studio leads to another room...

  10. Like
    dhPotter reacted to shawnhar in Finally, getting a "real" studio!   
    After taking over our only bathroom for the last 2 years ( I literally have to leave my "studio" when my wife uses the bathroom), we finally won a bid on a house in the town where my wife's store is!
    The housing market has been INSANE over the last year, we had to give them until July 2 to be out. That is crazy, but we lost 2 other bids this year so it is what it is. We are really excited about the new place.
     The studio is going to be amazing. The guy is a welder so there is already a 200 amp sub panel with 50 amp and a 30 amp outlet with the correct receptacle.  I could literally plug my kiln in the day we move in and wiring up the big kiln will be super easy, especially if it's already #6 wire, just have to plug in a breaker, that's it. The only downsides are there is no water and it's not heated...yet!

  11. Like
    dhPotter reacted to Rick Wise in Oxide washes on top of glazes! Oh my!   
    I post this as sort of a "public service" to other pottery semi-newbies like myself.  I somehow never got the message that you can easily paint oxide (and mason stain) washes on top of glazes for a lot of added color or design.  The videos below brought this to my attention and I am really excited about the results.  It has opened up some new avenues for me.  I defer to Richard McColl for a full description but it could not be easier:
    Just add some oxides (or mason stains), a little water, and maybe some gerstley borate as a flux -- and apply ON TOP of your glaze for great color and effects.  Goes on great with a brush.  Make it the consistency of ink.  Hard to screw up.
    Some examples are at the bottom and here are the videos:
     
     
     



  12. Like
    dhPotter reacted to liambesaw in What’s on your workbench?   
    Here's what I've been up to in my free time.  Been making LED lamps.  Here's a few of the prototype designs. In greenware with crackle slip.
     




  13. Like
    dhPotter got a reaction from Algoessailing in Transparent cone 6 grey glaze?   
    @Algoessailing
    Searching for Clear will get you transparency glazes. Also look at digitalfire.com for clear glazes.
  14. Like
    dhPotter reacted to Joseph Fireborn in Transparent cone 6 grey glaze?   
    I am not disagreeing with you at all. I am sure plenty of people here have made a transparent grey glaze. You can search glazy for transparent grey glazes and find one pretty quick probably. 
    The reason I was saying to test is because everyone's kiln fires slightly different, clay is different, glaze ingredients are different, and many more things which make it nearly impossible to just say okay here is a transparent grey glaze and it work perfectly. The quickest way to find a glaze that works for you is to just do the dirty work and test with a bunch of tiles super quick. You could do a line blend or a dry addition method to quickly find where your transparency lies and then fine tune it to your acceptance level with only a few firings.
    The first thing I would do is find 5-10 transparent glazes on glazy or out of a book and fire them the way they come, do multiple dips, etc etc. Figure out which one does the best on your clay and your schedule. Then purchase a few different grey stains that you think you might like. Look for ones without opacifiers, such as tin oxide as everyone has said here already. 
    Now that you have your base transparent glazes that fit your body well and you are happy with the surface and durability run some simple line blends. https://wiki.glazy.org/t/volumetric-blend-testing/109
    After you run your line blend for the glazes  and have fired them you will have 30-40 tiles to look at and examine their transparency. Pick the ones you like the best and then you can finalize your range really quick to find the perfect transparency. 
    In total this took probably 3 maybe 4 firings to dial it in, but you will know exactly what you want and have a range of transparency.
     
    EDIT: I did a search and found this wonderful article that might help a good bit: https://wiki.glazy.org/t/grey-mid-fire-glazes/260
     
  15. Like
    dhPotter reacted to liambesaw in Spray glazing turns satin glaze glossy?   
    Probably need to spray a little thicker.
  16. Like
    dhPotter reacted to Dick White in Flocculation and deflocculation -- how much is enough?   
    Back to the original question of how to measure flocculation/deflocculation, or viscosity. Always measure specific gravity first to ensure the correct ratio of water to solids for that particular glaze the way you use it (i.e., spray, dip, brush, which can be further affected by the cone you bisque to). Then get a Zahn cup (expensive) or a Ford cup (cheap knockoff) to measure viscosity. Painters need to adjust the viscosity of the paint they are spraying and use a Zahn cup. It is a small cup with a handle that extends above the rim of the cup and a hole of a specific size in the bottom. Dip the cup into the glaze to fill it to the rim, lift it out and time how long it takes for the cup to empty through the small hole. I set my dipping glazes to a specific gravity of around 1.45 and drain from a #4 Ford cup in about 6.5 seconds. That's the scientific method. Others may use the finger dip or count the swirls until it comes to rest after a vigorous stir. Whatever works for you.
  17. Like
    dhPotter reacted to Min in Extremely stupid and ignorant to hazards with working with clay   
    Yup! About 60% of the earths crust is silica. Neat video showing "dust" from the Sahara travelling thousands of miles. Diatomaceous earth is approx 80-90% silica, much of the Saharan dust is diatomaceous earth from dried lake-beds in Chad. Not saying it's okay to have sloppy studio hygiene but keep it in perspective.
     
  18. Like
    dhPotter reacted to shawnhar in Extremely stupid and ignorant to hazards with working with clay   
    Relax, you are being paranoid.
    Take a look at Warren McKenzie's work area and note how much dried clay is on EVERYTHING, he's been doing this for 50 years.
    Not saying there isn't a risk, and you should keep your dust to a minimum, but there is no need to freak out.
  19. Like
    dhPotter reacted to Min in Porcelain pieces cracking in kiln during glaze firing   
    It could just be that they are trimmed too thinly where they are cracking, micro crack from uneven drying that opens up during firing.
  20. Like
    dhPotter reacted to ronfire in Glaze aplication advise   
    Thanks for the advise, think I will try the pour method. I have used a spray gun to paint doors and wall ect. but never a glaze.
    Here is the pot I will glaze.

  21. Like
    dhPotter reacted to liambesaw in Glaze aplication advise   
    Big bowls I put upside down on the banding wheel to pour the outside as it spins, then flip it over and pour some glaze inside, swish and pour out.  If you have a glaze that's really picky about being thick, might be a good idea to use a pump sprayer to spritz the inside bottom first so it doesn't absorb as much glaze.
    For spraying you don't thin out glaze, and like oldlady said, best to not try it out on something like this.  Takes a while to figure out when enough is enough with a sprayer.
    If you do want to try spraying, 40 psi on the regulator and put on a banding wheel outdoors, wearing a respirator.  I spray 3 layers, the last one ends up looking almost like orange peel wall texture.  Scratch in an inconspicuous spot to check thickness.
  22. Like
    dhPotter reacted to oldlady in Black chunks in fired glaze?   
    use the egg shells in fertilizer for your garden, get the right ingredients for making glaze.   it is hard enough without adding "what if" ingredients.
  23. Like
    dhPotter reacted to Mark C. in Thicken glaze?   
    Hey I know some potters who dumped about 1/2 gallon of epson salts into a 30 gallon batch of glaze  not knowing a thing about how to use the stuff. They eventually buried the whole 30 gallons in the yard.It was a ahha moment for them..
    In ceramics as in life you learn from your mistakes.The only diffference is there are many more mistakes to learn from in ceramics
  24. Like
    dhPotter reacted to liambesaw in Thicken glaze?   
    I went ahead and looked it up, and over flocculation occurs when the flocculant begins acting upon itself due to the concentration and actually removes itself from suspension in a chain reaction.
  25. Like
    dhPotter reacted to Mark C. in Fixing a fracture   
    Since its fired. Use the mug until it breaks -best option
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