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cp dunbar

Drawing Through A Glaze

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i am interested in a glaze that will allow me to draw through it while wet to show the glaze or clay body beneath, and display the form outlined by the "drawn through"  glaze.

 

thank you 

 

cp dunbar

 

 

 

will work on my spelling Tom, although i may have been more interested in the content of the post at the time.   Alas this is a fault of mine.

again, my apologies to all. 

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This is a bit vague, I don't think you're looking for a glaze as much as you're looking for a technique or resist or tool....

 

I'll add that the glaze shouldn't remain wet, the capillary action of the porous body should draw in the water from the glaze, leaving it relatively dry within seconds...

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You cannot carve through wet glazes, but you can when they are dry ... you have to watch it and judge when it is time to carve.

Perhaps one of our glaze experts can give you a recipe for one that does not move much during firing.

 

There is an article on Page 41 of the Jan/Feb 2014 issue of Pottery Making Illustrated that might be exactly what you want.

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Rogers,%20White%20Press%20Moulded%20Bott

 

cannot believe got replies so quickly,,,, and thank you all.

the video you mentioned is not exactly what i was looting for,,,,,, but i will use it on my next glaze fire,,,,,, and thank you for that.

 

sorry my question was ill formatted,,,,,,,,,,may i try again :)

 

this is a pot by Phil Rogers, english potter, known for his ash glazes, found on google, showing one form of "marking" or "drawing" through the slip, to make a pattern.

i believe it is done while wet, and perhaps done on a wetter clay body, causing less absorption, though done quickly for that reason.  This is similar to a light green glazed plate i believe also by phil rogers in his great book on ash glazes.

guess i am looking for a semi transparent glaze base, or anything of the like, or if anyone here has techniques they have done in the past.

have not seen this on the net myself.

 

just found this forum again,

thank you for the help, it is appreciated.

 

cp - by the pond where it is cold enough to freeze the lettuce in my garden  ( had to cover it with sheets in the middle of the night...........geeez)

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It looks as though those areas are raised and the glaze either breaks over them or they were covered with wax resist so the glaze did not adhere.

You can raise areas in several ways ... By using slips by brush or in slip trailers or by using resist to protect high areas and using water to wash away the rest.

I suspect the glaze broke over the raised areas as it looks like the kind of yummy glaze that does that.

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Among other things, Phil Rogers does use finger-wipe decoration

http://www.ceramike.com/gallery.asp?Potter=Phil%20Rogers&Pot=RogersPWipedVase

... sometimes glazing again afterwards

http://www.philrogerspottery.com/2012/10/05/pr-140/

 

A lot of pictures (some of finger-wiping), and some named glazes in

http://www.puckergallery.com/pdf/Rogers2012.pdf

 

The picture of the pot you referenced is IMHO a mixture of finger-wipes and glaze breaks at sharp edges.

 

Regards, Peter

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Was a potter here who carved successfully through  raw glazes i.e one applied to unbisqued ware. May be the way to go... carefully.

Got one of her pots will try to get an image up later.

Her name was Rhonda Boehm. Don't know if any of her stuff is online.

 

  EDIT      attachment=3727:Photo0265.jpg]

This glaze is a satin matte and looks very stable ie non moving in the firing

post-21244-0-09500200-1395879987_thumb.jpg

post-21244-0-09500200-1395879987_thumb.jpg

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Phil Rogers contributed an article "Choi Sung-Jae: Expressive Slip Drawings" in the book Surface Decoration: Finishing Techniques (edited by Anderson Tucker and published by American Ceramic Society). Here a link to Google images for Choi: https://www.google.com/search?q=choi+sung-jae+ceramics&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=l30zU92nO5WssQSgrIGAAw&ved=0CCYQsAQ&biw=1423&bih=690

 

The article traces the technique from finger-swipes through a wood ash-clay-raw lead glaze on Ongii storage jars to using white slip to lighten the surface of dark clay bodies -- what became the Punchong tradition. Choi uses a silica rich white slip that is brushed on leather-hard wares, then he draws with his fingers. All drawing must be done quickly, before the slip sets. Rogers notes that Choi uses press molds for his wares -- and Rogers square vases are press-molded, too. A look through Rogers pottery at Goldmark shows he is doing finger swipes through glazes -- nuka, temoku. http://www.goldmarkart.com/ceramics/potters/phil-rogers.html

 

You could probably add glycerine or other additives to glaze that would keep it moist longer, perhaps long enough to do the finger art.

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i am interested in a glaze that will allow me to draw threw it while wet to show the glaze or clay body beneath, and display the form outlined by the "drawn thru"  glaze.

 

thank you 

 

cp dunbar

Mr. Dunbar;

Through is spelled "through". You have misspelled it two different ways in your post. There is an edit button on the bottom right.I would be grateful if you used it.

Tom.

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Mr. Dunbar;

Through is spelled "through". You have misspelled it two different ways in your post. There is an edit button on the bottom right.I would be grateful if you used it.

Tom.

 

I'd  have to agree: it makes me wince when I see really bad spelling, (including text speak abbreviations like "thru") but I've resigned myself to ignoring it as  I've rarely seen any good come from criticising or correcting someone's spelling on the internet.

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A couple of videos. In the first Phil talks about a finger-wiped bottle.

 

Second is a long talk. Of particular relevance to this thread

- finger-wiping at 45:50 in

- waxing at 47:00 in (Phil applied a V thin glaze, then wax, then full glaze to avoid a bare body)

 

Re S Dean's comment on thin streaks. Has anybody tried finger-wiping with one of those rubber tipped "brushes"?

 

Regards, Peter

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appreciate the help from all

 

bciskepottery thank you for the choi sung-jae note.

looked among my books and found the mentioned article.  

that article was the inspiration i had seen in the past, but could not remember its origin.

 

glad i asked the question though, as i learned a lot.

 

cp - by the pond where my dog came in drier than before, but still wagging her tail.

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HOLY MOLY!

 

That video should be required viewing for any surface decoration class.

 

I think I got about 100 ideas just from watching the first five minutes.

I was too entranced to form any thoughts at all. I'm fairly certain that some type of subliminal message was implanted in my head, while viewing the video.

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Another video, showing hoe Phil combines faceting with finger wiping, good potters are a very ingenious lot.

 

Finally, Phil moves from informative videos into high-pressure telemarketing, but cannot keep a straight face.

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HOLY MOLY!

 

That video should be required viewing for any surface decoration class.

 

I think I got about 100 ideas just from watching the first five minutes.

I was too entranced to form any thoughts at all. I'm fairly certain that some type of subliminal message was implanted in my head, while viewing the video.

 

I'm waiting to see if it worked! ;)  

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