Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

New On The Greenware Shelf For The New Year!


  • Please log in to reply
17 replies to this topic

#1 JustPeachy

JustPeachy

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 72 posts
  • LocationEastern Tennessee

Posted 01 January 2014 - 04:21 PM

I'm so excited to be playing at home! This is the 3rd piece that I've thrown here and actually the second handle that I've ever pulled, ever. I'm just having a blast.

Of course, I threw this last year and got the handle done this year, so I think it counts.

 

My Chunky Monkey Milk/Creamer

creamer_zpsded034e8.jpg

 

Have you got anything new for the New Year yet?



#2 clay lover

clay lover

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 813 posts
  • LocationSoutheast

Posted 01 January 2014 - 06:12 PM

Good looking little pitcher, and nice handle. I love pitchers and make mine little and sort of squatty, like the Kool Aid guy. Really round belly an short, defined neck. That is my definition of 'pitcher'.

#3 Denice

Denice

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 646 posts
  • LocationWichita, Kansas

Posted 01 January 2014 - 06:48 PM

Mostly spent my time working on a on going project a 5'x6' mural, but with my husbands help got a new table built for my test kiln that has vertical storage under it for my large and small kiln shelves.  I had one before that I had made myself but it was pretty sorry, the design was good, the execution stunk.  The top is now heavy metal tread plate formed as a box and filled with firebricks.  It will be nice to get my shop back in order.    Denice



#4 Pres

Pres

    Retired Art Teacher

  • Moderators
  • 1,898 posts
  • LocationCentral, PA

Posted 01 January 2014 - 06:49 PM

Like the another recent discussion . . . you never know what that will be used for. I look at it and think perfect for meat drippings, or for gravy. Others might see a chocolate sauce pitcher, or as titled a creamer. At any rate you should be proud of a good start in your home studio.


Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#5 Diane Puckett

Diane Puckett

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 398 posts
  • LocationAsheville, NC

Posted 01 January 2014 - 08:27 PM

Nice handle!
Diane Puckett
Dry Ridge Pottery

#6 Babs

Babs

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 814 posts

Posted 01 January 2014 - 09:10 PM

what glazes are you putting on this pot? Good start to the year for you.

Bisquing pots made prior to Xmas, and, doing some throwing exercises set by the bad man. :angry: The hate stage, John B, trying to feel religious about this..



#7 jrgpots

jrgpots

    The hands can express the soul

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 450 posts
  • LocationHurricane, Utah

Posted 01 January 2014 - 09:31 PM

what glazes are you putting on this pot? Good start to the year for you.
Bisquing pots made prior to Xmas, and, doing some throwing exercises set by the bad man. :angry: The hate stage, John B, trying to feel religious about this..

In the spirit of penatence,....Amen to the 10 thowing exercises.

It's nice to know that there are others "exercising."

Jed

#8 Bill T.

Bill T.

    member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 71 posts
  • LocationGilmer, Texas

Posted 01 January 2014 - 09:41 PM

My wife has been telling me to make some pitchers cause people like to collect them.  Kind of got away from them, but one I happened to have I glazed just before Christmas and it sold within 2 days.  My New Year's present to myself is hot water in the shop!!!

Already had water but it sure is cold in the winter.  My son-in-law had given me a small 6 gallon 110 V  heater several years ago, and I finally got around to hooking it to the water supply and electric in the shop.  After 8 years throwing with cold water it's a joy now. 



#9 Chris Campbell

Chris Campbell

    clay stained since 1988

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,108 posts
  • LocationRaleigh, NC

Posted 01 January 2014 - 10:56 PM

Your pitcher reminded me of the very early work of one of my friends, Antoinette Badenhorst.

The first image is of her early pitcher and the second is what she makes today .... there are no limits to where you can go!

www.porcelainbyantoinette.com

Attached Files


Chris Campbell
Contemporary Fine Colored Porcelain
www.ccpottery.com

TRY ...   FAIL ...  LEARN ...  REPEAT


#10 High Bridge Pottery

High Bridge Pottery

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 344 posts
  • LocationNewcastle Upon Tyne. England

Posted 02 January 2014 - 07:44 AM

I have seen a few posts about these throwing exercises but after a search I can't seem to find them. I would like to give them a read if anybody could link :D

 

Sorry for going off topic.

 

You are making me jealous saying that is only your second handle, it looks so much better than my 100th attempt at a handle. Now I just make mugs and change their names to tea bowls when I give up with the handles  ;)

 

Correct me if I am wrong but the pouring bit looks a little thick, I thought a sharpish edge cut the flow of liquid much better. Great jug anyway  :)


                                                                                                                 1384226_215924051918490_1181728069_n.jpg


#11 JustPeachy

JustPeachy

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 72 posts
  • LocationEastern Tennessee

Posted 02 January 2014 - 08:46 AM

Thanks for all of the kind comments. You guys are great!

 

Good looking little pitcher, and nice handle. I love pitchers and make mine little and sort of squatty, like the Kool Aid guy. Really round belly an short, defined neck. That is my definition of 'pitcher'.

 

CL, I love the kool aid visual! Hilarious! Currently everything is coming out little and squatty, but I'm working on it. :D

 

Like the another recent discussion . . . you never know what that will be used for. I look at it and think perfect for meat drippings, or for gravy. Others might see a chocolate sauce pitcher, or as titled a creamer. At any rate you should be proud of a good start in your home studio.

 

Thanks Pres! Anything with chocolate is bound to be awesome. I really like that idea.

 

what glazes are you putting on this pot? Good start to the year for you.

Bisquing pots made prior to Xmas, and, doing some throwing exercises set by the bad man. :angry: The hate stage, John B, trying to feel religious about this..

 

Babs, I currently don't have many ideas about what kinds of glazes to use. I'm just practicing throwing and trying to get a decent cylinder, oh, and enough greenware to do my first bisque firing, so that's still some time away.

 

Your pitcher reminded me of the very early work of one of my friends, Antoinette Badenhorst.

The first image is of her early pitcher and the second is what she makes today .... there are no limits to where you can go!

www.porcelainbyantoinette.com

 

Chris, thank you for the inspiration! Her work is absolutely gorgeous. Blew me away.

 

I have seen a few posts about these throwing exercises but after a search I can't seem to find them. I would like to give them a read if anybody could link :D

 

Sorry for going off topic.

 

You are making me jealous saying that is only your second handle, it looks so much better than my 100th attempt at a handle. Now I just make mugs and change their names to tea bowls when I give up with the handles  ;)

 

Correct me if I am wrong but the pouring bit looks a little thick, I thought a sharpish edge cut the flow of liquid much better. Great jug anyway  :)

 

I'd love to see the throwing exercises too if anyone would post the link that'd be great!

 

The handle was easy. I've never milked a cow, never wanted to either, but that is how I think about pulling a handle. Seems like it would be similar only you can't rotate a teat 180 degrees with every turn. That really would be a mad cow!

 

I'm not really sure how it will pour. I was just happy to get the handle attached and directly opposite the spout. I knew by looking that it needed a heavy, largess handle to balance out the squattyness of it. It weighs a ton so it will probably crack anyways truth be told. The bugger for me was figuring out how to trim the darn thing without a chuck! Gahhhh!

 

It's all about the journey!
 



#12 clay lover

clay lover

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 813 posts
  • LocationSoutheast

Posted 02 January 2014 - 09:03 AM

I haven't gotten into the studio yet after the holiday mess, still have decorations to take down, today's job.
When I do , I am going to work on an idea that has been in the back of my mind for a long time. Some loosely formed, from a slab ,tall as my kiln, 28", THING. with a lot of texture and an oval footprint.
I have a BIG cardboard tube I am going to slice in half to make supports for the 2 pieces, don't know where I am going after that. Total take off from anything I have been doing.

I would like to see the throwing exercises, also. I am planning on throwing sets of 10 of something, lining them up as to quality and throwing the bottom 5 back in the pug mill, then 10 more, do the same, going through that several times until I have 20 saved pots, then lining them up as to quality and tossing the bottom 10 back in the pug mill. Should be interesting. Think I will take photos of the first bottom 5 and top 5, then compare them to the 10 final keepers.

I am always amazed by students that can throw 20 of something and not have the last any better than the first! Seen it many times, if that was me, it would drive me nuts.

#13 Frank Hott

Frank Hott

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 7 posts
  • LocationNorth Georgia

Posted 02 January 2014 - 09:43 AM

 

Chris, thank you for sharing your friend's progress....that is very encouraging to those of us who are infants in this art.  I worked in my studio yesterday and finished some handles on my "266" mugs.  I've gone from hating handles (because they were hard to do) to loving them.....as Simon Leach says, "keep practicing".  That is such wonderful advice!



#14 Roberta12

Roberta12

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 115 posts
  • LocationColorado

Posted 02 January 2014 - 10:56 AM

High Bridge and Just Peachy, John Baymore has some throwing exercises.  He will send them to you if you ask him.   I plan on starting back in the studio next week, so I will see what those exercises entail!  



#15 Babs

Babs

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 814 posts

Posted 02 January 2014 - 04:54 PM

Great exercises!! See John for them. I'm grimacing but loving them, just don't tell the teacher! So far, lighter  mugs!, aching fingers, new found muscles, wracked brain, trying to forget the old ways, and the pots that should be in shops well they'll have to wait till I have a few more sessions under my belt, addictive.



#16 Nancy S.

Nancy S.

    My day job pays for my clay habit

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 166 posts
  • LocationHarrisburg area, PA

Posted 02 January 2014 - 05:38 PM

Nice handle!!! Mine always get distorted by the time I get them on the pot and I can never seem to get the inner shape right. <_<



#17 Pugaboo

Pugaboo

    Lifetime artist 2nd year potter

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 373 posts
  • LocationHelen, GA

Posted 02 January 2014 - 11:54 PM

I need to ask John for the exercises as well.

For the new year I have already done something new I made a place setting. 1 large dinner plate, 1 salad plate, 1 soup bowl, and 1 tumbler. We'll see if all the pieces survive all the way through. I have also started a set of 4 short tumblers and a carrier to hold them. I am trying to make more functional ware this year. I really enjoy making the decorative and sculpted pieces but feel I should also make the stuff people might actually want to buy. Lol

I am going to be the featured artist in the spring show in March, this will also be a first for me, so I have tons of new and cool stuff to make. Plan to do a couple animal sculptures, push a vase design further than I did last time, do some UG transfer pieces as well as laser and mason stain transfer items, and of course paint some scenes on some forms too.

Oh and I WILL learn to center and throw an entire form of some kind on the wheel... The sooner the better grrr.

Terry
The world is but a canvas to the imagination - Henry David Thoreau

#18 Shuli

Shuli

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 7 posts
  • LocationDallas, Texas

Posted 03 January 2014 - 12:28 AM

I have decided to be more disciplined this year.  Right now I'm making 12 of everything.  Not sure why I chose the number 12, actually.

 

For example, my sister's husband requested a custom mug (he has very large hands and wants something that he can hold comfortably), so I made 12 mugs.  Of course I got interested in the challenge and forgot to incorporate extra-large handles, so I'll have to go back and make a thirteenth mug.

 

It was a very good way to experiment with new techniques and learn more about form and balance.

 

Now I want to enter the next Baltimore Clayworks exhibition (http://www.baltimore...ke_It_Baby.html) which is all salt and pepper shakers, so I am making 12 salt and pepper sets!

 

I'll try to post pics when I can wrestle my phone away from my ten-year-old.






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users