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Babs

Advice On Trimming/turning Feet On Plates

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Babs    386

So how do you  trim feet on plates? Notice some potters do virtually no trimming ie foot of plate sits as a "slab". Others do defined feet but this seems to warp if the thickness is not right. I have left bands of thicker clay between more  trimmed sections, what is best/most efficient?

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Mark C.    1,807

I throw plenty of clay -6#s for a 10 1/2 plate then trim the underside away and I leave a small nubin which I sign in middle . This keeps the plate from slumping at cone 11 as its all porcelain in my pottery.

I'm known for these nubins on my wares.

Mark

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neilestrick    1,381

I trim a foot on plates just like any other pots. A lot of clay comes off due to the width of the foot, but I think it looks much more finished than a flat bottom. I do not leave a ring in the middle, as I don't have slumping problems with my porcelain. With stoneware it shouldn't be a problem at all.

 

The foot should sit where the lip meets the flat part of the plate. If it is unevenly trimmed, the plate can warp during drying, resulting in the plate sitting on the center section rather than the foot. I do not glaze the bottom of my plates. There's just not enough clearance.

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Mark C.    1,807

I should add I glaze the bottoms of all my plates no matter what size.The nubbin is a hold over from long ago-most of the time its still above the foot plane not touching shelve (flat advancers)

Mark

heres a photo of my plate bottoms in bisque and glaze states

You can see this nubbin which is trimed a bit more that the outer foot plane so its above that foot plane.

 

post-8914-0-66675500-1387079750_thumb.jpg

post-8914-0-66675500-1387079750_thumb.jpg

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Babs    386

Thanks people, I think I have been too scimpy with the quantity of clay/plate from start off.

Like your glazed bases Mark. I'll try nubbin and concentric rings!

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Pres    896

When I first started throwing Patens(communion plates) I started with flat bottoms, then trimming double rings. I lost a ton of plates to trimming too thin, drying too fast and cracking, cracking in firing, and other production problems.  One day I decided to correct my trimming with about 10 new plates. I used a thick needle tool with no point, put a piece of tape on it where an appropriate amount of needle stuck out for the trimmed thickness. Then I put a series of pin holes into the plate from top to bottom. While trimming I watched carefully  to see where the holes would show up. When the holes showed I stopped trimming. Then I burnished over the holes. I continued to use this technique until I was able to judge by eye, feel and sound.

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Mart    23

Auy ideas what those "heavy weight roller" are actually called? Or what are they actually used for (in real life, you know LOL).

I looked around few shops but nothing.

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Chantay    101

I will have to give this a try.  I don't currently have any problems with my plate bottoms, I just dislike all the scrape from the cuttings, scrape that has to be recycled.  I hate recycling clay. 

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Mark C.    1,807

A few very common errors with flatware are -

 

 

Not leaving enough clay to trim a decent foot with a glazed bottom

Uneven trimming-which can cuase many issues

Making them to thin 

Putting the foot in the wrong spot-warping issues

 

I suggest making a run(8-12) of smaller salad plates-get the hang of it and then go for the big ones

Keep in mind many dishwashers will not take a plate over 11 inches

As Pres said above get a feel for how think they are everywhere-master this and your plates will always be great ones with no loss rate.

Mark

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