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barb9000

applying iron oxide to greenware

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I apply dry greenware for a soft subtle color...bisque fire then glaze with a clear glaze and glaze fire.  I found if I applied to the bisque and applied glaze over it.  The glaze seemed to wash out the oxide somewhat, and since this is a subtle effect anyhow it left it pretty washed out indeed.  So now I do the oxides on  the greenware and the bisque firing sets the subtle coloring into the clay.  I do not wipe them off though, Just gently brush on the oxide and it settles darker in the cracks and crevices of the pieces quite naturally..leaving the smooth areas much lighter.

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I was hoping that I could use the red iron oxide mixed with only water on greenware to just add simple decoration to planters that I am firing to 1080 Celcius. Thought that it would melt onto the pot like a glaze. Is there a way to do this, or do I need to mix it with clear glaze for it to stick?

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My experience says it will 'stick' with firing to 1080oC, but I don't know if the colour would last indefinitely. For copper and cobalt oxides, if you want the greens and blues they definitely need a glaze on top. If you're just after black it may be ok without. An underglaze of the final colour you're after will do the job without glazing over. These contain the flux and some clay, so they do bond to the surface. Someone here will be able to advise I'm sure.

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I think the general consensus when using raw oxides to paint on is to mix them 50/50 with a frit. Adding some clay would help stop it dusting off the pot before fired if that becomes an issue.

 

This will still not be glassy/glossy but will have the metallic sheen. Over cone6 you can just use it 'as is' I think.

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An iron oxide decoration fired to 1080°C would show for many years on a planter. Think about this: the pink-red color of planters is also coming from iron.

Cobalt and copper would last for awhile.

 

I personally apply oxides on leather hard pieces and bisqueware. Time consuming patterns get a second bisque. I almost always put glazes over (transparent but not clear usually). I don't work on greenware-- too fragile and too absorbant.

I mix my oxides with china clay. So I am really using an oxide laden slip. This help reduce globs from blistering and generally makes brushed application easier.

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Consensus among the potters I hang with is to add some fine white clay (EPK is usually handy) to the oxide wash for C10, and I've had good results at C6.  it does settle quickly, as I'm sure frit would, but I just realized I've never flocculated it, and that will be the subject of tonight's experiment.  Epsom salts is our friend!

 

BTW, Iron Chromate seems to yield a nice chocolate brown, less red than the various iron oxides.

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