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Natania

Heater for studio

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Natania    6

I currently have a space heater (well, actually two) to heat my studio, but they are barely adequate. Someone recently told me about a propane fired one that mounts to the wall and vents outside and which has a thermostat One brand is called Rinnai (hope I spelled it correctly). Does anyone use one of these types of heaters, and if so, do they work well?

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OffCenter    82

It will probably work much better than the elect space heaters. I use a Mr. Heater (the double-sized one) propane heater to heat up my studio then turn it off and let two electric heaters keep it warm.

 

Jim

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We have one in a sun porch, a Rinnai that runs on natural gas. It is at one end of an 8x25 porch. We keep a ceiling ran running on low speed at the other end of the porch, and the heater does a great job. We had to locate it at the end, because code required it be a certain distance from any window above it. We also found a remote thermostat online which we were able to install ourselves. It is in the middle of the room and is not directly wired to the heater. If you want more specifics about the thermostat, let me know.

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smastca    3

Do you have a south facing wall - this may help defray some of the costs for heating. A pop can heater. wink.gif It looks simple and easy to do.

 

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Pugaboo    438

I have a wall mounted propane fed heater in my studio it seems to do a good job of keeping things toasty. The propane tank is a big one that's outside my house and the contractor joined the heater into the gas line for the fireplace. All in all I'm very pleased with it. Oh and sorry I don't know off the the top of my head which brand I have.

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OffCenter    82

Do you have a south facing wall - this may help defray some of the costs for heating. A pop can heater. wink.gif It looks simple and easy to do.

 

Interesting. Thanks for posting it.

 

Jim

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

I have found those overhead heaters in clay studios create an uneven draft. If you use one, be sure to cover your work well so you won't get uneven drying and warping.

I used an old kerosene heater for overnight to prevent freezing. Then a wood stove during the day.

Down in South Texas, I don't have heat, just A/C.

 

Marcia

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Natania    6

I have found those overhead heaters in clay studios create an uneven draft. If you use one, be sure to cover your work well so you won't get uneven drying and warping.

I used an old kerosene heater for overnight to prevent freezing. Then a wood stove during the day.

Down in South Texas, I don't have heat, just A/C.

 

Marcia

 

 

I've thought of a kerosene heater but apparently they are illegal in Massachusetts. Someone told me to cross into Connecticut and just buy one there, but I guess it made me a little nervous. I also thought of a wood stove but I don't think I can spare the room. The whole studio is only 10 x 12' , And in such a small place id probably get blasted out by the heat if i did have one in there. We have one in the house though, which works wonderfully.

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Natania    6

how about one of those directional infra red radiating heater? No blowers .

 

Marcia

 

 

 

 

 

 

I looked a few up quickly online and this looks like a promising option. Thank you! I am hoping to find one that works on propane since it seems easier to procure than kerosene (which I always think of as a dirty type of fuel, but maybe I am wrong?). I will do more research when I have time. I like the idea of no blower very much.

Thanks again!

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Benzine    609

My parents have had an infrared heater for years, in their living room, and love it. It does seem to do a good job of keeping a good portion of their main floor warm. They recently bought another, for their bedroom, at the opposite end of the house. So they just have those running, and turn down the main thermostat in the house.

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Natania    6

They do look great. However, one of my concerns is that after I am done with a work session in the winter, is it safe to leave the heater on low all night to let the ware dry out and not freeze when I am not in the studio? Right now I can get the temp. semi-comfortable for working if it isn't too arctic outside, but I don't like leaving the little cheapo electric space heater on all night when I am not in the studio...are the infrared ones made to be left unattended?

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Mark C.    1,797

If you are looking for an safe all night heater get a oil filled electric one they come in baseboard or roll around types-they heat slowly over time and and will keep space from freezing.They will be less affective to really heat a cold large space but will keep it from the freeze.

Mark

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Pres    896

We put one of these in my new studio. Price is fairly reasonable, but not 'cheap'. The thermostat goes down to 41°, so we can keep it just above freezing:

 

http://www.homedepot...s&storeId=10051

 

Alice

 

 

I have a brick garage that is separate from the house, single car. I have to have heat over night whenever I am working so that the temp of the bricks does not get to cold. I use a plug in infrared box for that. During working hours in the winter I also run a garage heater-wired in 220V. The two of these will get the garage up to 58-60F. on cold days, I wear insulated pants and base layer 2 tops to work in. Cold so most of the time I work more in the Fall, Spring and Summer. However, I have some orders I need to get out so I have been running the heat-still cold.

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bciskepottery    925

I have an overhead 5K watt, 240v heater installed in my garage studio (one car size). I had a thermostat installed to give me more discrete control. Low setting is 40 degrees, which keeps things from freezing during winter, although in Northern VA, many days I just leave it turned off at night or when I'm not working. When working, I usually set the thermostat to 60 degrees, which allows me to work comfortably. I also added some insulation to the garage ceiling.

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Denice    243

I have used an oil filled electric heater in my shop to supplement the heat I have. My shop is attached to my house and has a vent from the house for the shop, but it doesn't begin to heat it, just keeps it from freezing. I have forgotten to turn off the electric heater at night a couple of times and the shop is very hot the next morning. It does take a while to heat up the shop so I turn it on first thing in the morning before I do anything. My studio is well insulated sounds like you have a lot of windows you may have to put plastic over them to cut down on heat loss. Is your floor concrete? You might think about tiling it and putting a heated floor mat under the tile. Denice

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yedrow    8

I bought an old electric furnace and stuck it in my studio, and it works great. I got a thermostat for 20 bucks at a hardware store to control it.

 

 

heater_zps14b4407c.jpg

 

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Isculpt    96

An electric oil-filled heater as Mark suggested is the ticket. I have a pricey electric heat pump for my house, but the little $50 oil-filled heater in my 350 square foot studio (with two huge windows and three half-glass doors) keeps that studio almost as warm as my house. It has 3 heat settings, and I leave it on low when I'm not in the studio. On a 45 degree day followed by a 25 degree night, the studio will be around 60 degrees the next morning. If I leave it on medium, the studio is around 65 degrees. I have a wall-mounted heater/air conditioner that I almost never turn on, and I rarely need to turn the oil-filled heater to high, even though I'm very cold-natured and keep my house at 70-72 degrees. Given that the heaters are very efficient, mobile, inexpensive and have a small footprint, I can't praise these little guys highly enough.

Jayne

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