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trina

New Year Pottery Plans

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I am just wondering what new ideas people have for their own work this year. I personally am going to improve the business side of my studio. And I have been playing around with lustre glazes which i am hoping to improve on. I also have the drawings done for another large mural which I will start as soon as I have digested all the Christmas and New Year food. I wish all you potters out there a super productive, creative year. Don't forget to inspire as many people as you can! I look forward to hearing from you. Regards Trina

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Get the shop cleaned up more. Do up orders of chalices and patens for Spring orders. Complete a set of lamps for my sister. Do a few show pieces for Spring and summer shows. Work on glaze color development and decoration techniques.

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Pres your list is very impressive I plan to do some glaze testing and go a new direction with my work, tired of tiles and work on my throwing, haven't thrown for several years. I did some throwing last week didn't do to bad but the sore arms the next day told me I need to throw everyday to build up my strength, at least my shop is clean temporarily. I also plan to do some charity work and help my husband with body work on 61 Ranchero restoration project. Denice

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Practice, practice, and practice, study, explore ,& workshops.

Not so many new ideas yet, still trying to complete the list of old ideas I still have yet to try.

Happy and productive New year to all as well.

Juli

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nice theme

I would like to do some of my sketched projects that for some reason I am nor doing now, big articulated doll or creatures, and some "tiles" bass relived small (but not too much! rolleyes.gif) pieces to hug on walls...and so many more things I would love to get to do! use the new (for me) larger kiln, and try new surface techniques and master big forms and try more glazes and and and! great holidays for you all!!biggrin.gifbiggrin.gifsmile.gif

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Planning to start work tomorrow on building a spray booth so I can spray more glazes. That will make it easier to make larger pieces. Also, to reorganize the studio and keep it neater.

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I'm getting back into clay after a nearly 20 year absence. It took me FOUR MONTHS to throw a bowl as good as the very first bowl I ever threw.

 

My goal now is to throw a bowl as good as the best bowl I ever threw. That may take me another year, LOL!

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Hi all,

what a great topic to think about at the end of the year mellow.gif to put next years plans into perspective.

 

I have already been accepted to do the Honours year of my degree in Visual Arts- major ceramics, booked a great surface printing workshop for March and will start a 3 month writing course focussed on ceramics. Now that alone will keep me busy! But in my mind there are a zillion ideas flying around that I want to do but probably havnt a hope of fitting in lol

 

We had planned on moving 2 hours away from our current home and have had our home on the market for 9 months with no offers. When you are in that 'no mans land' of not knowing what facilities you will have at the new place its difficult to make plans. But this week we are doing a re-think and may just stay where we are.

So hubby has just committed a promise to me - if we stay, he is building me a raku kiln and installing my second hand gas kiln I bought 18 months ago that he has not installed because we would be moving. how exciting for me!! All this will lead to lots of experimenting with lots of fun.

 

wishing every one a very creative year and the best of health and happiness

 

regards, Lyn

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At this point in time I am giving serious thought to buying a kiln and trying to take this all a bit farther. To do this I will have to go out on my own because the college I take classes at frowns/prohibits students from selling their work/going into production/etc. and I have already heard a bit of flack regarding a comment I made (where I tossed out a price "range") to another student when they asked "how much?" I wanted for one of my peices

 

In the end I'm doin this for fun and therapy but if I can evolve it into >more<...I'm sure not gonna let anyone stand in my way.

 

happy pottin', all!

 

teardrop

 

 

 

 

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We have spent the last year working on the studio, and I am content with that. Bobby is going to build the reduction kiln, but I am not in a hurry for it.

 

I have attended a lot of workshops this past year, and I have a head full of stuff I want to do. As I took a workshop, I would take time to gather the materials I needed for that effort, so now

I have stockpiles of what I need to get those projects done. I envision winter days working on projects I have learned about in the workshops.

 

I am searching for that work that would/could interest me for a long long time. I am narrowing my choices of clay and glazes. I need to find my kind of pottery.

 

Being all spread out with a multitude of choices is thrilling to me, but it is expensive, and I need to make good use of my time.

 

Happy New Year to all!

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I am going to work on larger pieces this year and try to find/perfect a ^10 blue/green celedon glaze. I also want to work with salt firing again... just have to find a partner in crime for that one. rolleyes.gif

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Plans for the New Year!---Hmmm To be inspired. Try to throw bigger, thinner, more refined pieces. To finish another term of ceramic art school. Try new ideas and techniques and try to think more outside of the normal box. To challenge myself and not to be afraid to fail or make mistakes or have to start over but use it to learn from to futher myself and and excel. Incorporate throwing with handbuilding a bit more. Work on my glazing and glazes in gerneral. To build a better relationship with my kiln. Look into doing some shows and sales. But if all else fails then to just to get muddy, have fun, relax and let what happens-----happen. Somtimes your best work comes from just that. I know some of mine have. Have a great and muddy year everyone.

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Lol, I just had back to back phone calls with the owner of the studio where I rent space and his manager, also a ceramicist regarding next year!

 

The studio is still a bit unorganized with lots of stuff lying around (the kiln and glazing area is about the size of a tennis court), but we are slowly organizing it. He got 2 extractor fans - one for the new spray booth, the other to extract heat and fumes from the 8 kilns. We booked a combined space at our country's major design expo the first week of March, so we all have started to develop new work. As soon as I am back at the studio (5th Jan) I need to fix my moldmaking area. Up to recently I used my ex's studio to make my molds. But I finally got my cutting tools, dental plaster to make a monster bat that fits onto a wheel, and other stuff. Till I am back at work, I am just sitting and formulating shrinkage (17%) on stuff I want to develop so I can cut molds.

We are also getting a new tenant and I hope that he will help me to work on the wheel. I have not thrown pots for more than 20 years :-)

 

Until then I am sleeping sleeping sleeping.

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Wow, Thanks for all the wonderful replies! I really do look forward to hearing about all the challenges, hard work, and joys that we will all have in the new year. Hopefully we can all cheer each other on when it comes to cleaning the studios! I just had all my floors sealed about two months ago and it as made a huge difference in hielping to keep the dust down. Again thanks and have a great start to the year! Trina

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I'm working at trying to find what I'm good at in the ceramics area. I guess I'm still "finding myself" as the artistic expression goes.

 

 

I need to organize, and mange my time a little better, and I wouldn't mind trying to get into a few festivals this year if I can get some inventory built up, but I think the first one is most important.

 

Great thread!

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Hi all

I re-visited this convo to hear what everyone was up to...

......Hi Teardrop, out of curiosity is there a reason your university/college doesnt allow discussion on sales? To me that is a vital componant in learning about ceramics

ie how to sell what you make. Part of our study has subjects on business management etc.

We even have a 'ceramics club' that is outside the curriculum but we organize 3 sales a year on the uni premises and they are very popular. Each artist makes some money and a % goes to the club funds which we then draw on to assist members who want to attend outside workshops etc. A constant discussion within the studios is based on selling, how to get into exhibitions and how to price your work

Sounds like its a very touchy subject where you are.

cheers Lyn

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Hi all

I re-visited this convo to hear what everyone was up to...

......Hi Teardrop, out of curiosity is there a reason your university/college doesnt allow discussion on sales? To me that is a vital componant in learning about ceramics

ie how to sell what you make.

 

 

Yeah, I've been wondering about this too. What do they expect you guys to do, live on dreams and hopeful thinking? Eat your clay, maybe?

 

Why do they do this, other than just being dumb-clucks?

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Hi All,

I think this may be the 2nd time i have used this forum. My plans for the New Year include trying to adjust to using commercial glazes...so far much disappointment....

 

and to improve my throwing skills after a 10 year hiatus. I had my own studio for about 25 years before that.

 

Certain changes to joints of back and arms have increased the challenges so that even centering movements have had to be changed to adapt

to my weaknesses. But...since I became a partner in a studio last March I have been making good progress.

People are just finding the shop and Christmas sales were very encouraging.

 

I certainly agree with the questions raised about pricing and selling work. If we had more opportunities for apprenticeships then students could learn

the realities of costs of maintaining a studio and good sales practices.

 

Happy New Year,

Encore

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Certain changes to joints of back and arms have increased the challenges so that even centering movements have had to be changed to adapt

to my weaknesses. But...since I became a partner in a studio last March I have been making good progress.

 

 

 

Hello, Encore. I am also adjusting to many physical changes since last I threw a pot. My issues are mostly to do with fatigue and general weakness. I was never anything you could call "professional" when I was at it before, only a talented amateur. The hardest thing when I started back was coming to terms with the fact that I couldn't just sit down and start off fairly easily, as these things used to come easily to me. But I am making progress! I hope your studio situation works out well for you.

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......Hi Teardrop, out of curiosity is there a reason your university/college doesnt allow discussion on sales? >snip<

 

Thanks for asking. I was a bit taken back by the "policy" when I was informed of it myself.

 

Basically, I made a number of kitchen items that I earmarked for gifts for close friends/family who have stood by my/my wife's side over the last (tough) year.

After they came out of the kiln more than one person asked me if I was going to sell any of them...and if so..for how much. I made comment that these were all spoken for but that I was planning on making a quite a few more over the next Semester....possibly even enough to rent a booth at the college Art fair this summer and see if I could do anything to help pay for a part of my new habit. As a noob...I could only guess what such an item might sell for....and I never actually stated a price but I did make the comment to both ladies of "i dunno...what do you think is a fair price for such an item?" (I know..some of you are cringing about now...LOL)

 

the instructor heard the entire conversation, and later when I was helping in the studio she told me that I couldn't do "production" work in the studio and use the kiln/glazes/etc. to make products that would be sold for profit. If I did so..she said I would be asked to leave class/etc. Her explanation was that there are many potters in our area who woould love to have such a set up with kiln use and glazes and etc..etc..and that if the college let me do such a thing any other student/artist/etc. locally who got wind of it would "pitch a ######" and the college would recieve flack/etc.

 

My guess about it all? There may be some truth to the fact that other potters/students might feel slighted if they did not get the same kinda of nod, but at the same time I feel that if you take the class (and pay double the going rate for your clay through the college) and the class includes "open studio" much of the week....high output from some students should be expected and even encouraged....

 

Secondly....She is an artist herself and SHE does production work out of the college studio that she sells...I believe contrary to the same policy....and if she allows others to do so she may jeopardize her own production work in-house. (I say this from overhearing comment she herself made in studio)

 

I have to say that hearing the "policy" caught me off guard...and I responded a bit defensively and made the comment that I would not be limited... and then she backed off and nothing more was said other than another student came up to me and said "I need to tell you a story..but not here"... (she is prolific as well and I believe, has had a similar experience..though she still does what she wants from what I can see)

 

Overall this is not a huge deal to me and I am not going to make it so in class/etc. I will simply buy my own kiln and fire the peices I intend to sell seperately from the peices I will make in class.

I just found it contradictory that I had spoke to her directly about purchasing booth space for a weekend Art show at the the college this coming summer and felt that..um...where ELSE wuold I make the stuff I would sell at a College Art Show..IF I could sell anything at all.... but at the college (?)

 

As a result of "policy"...I'm no longer interested in purchasing a space at the show. IMO, my $$$ would be better spent in the gas tank hitting a handful of stores >>I<< have shopped in/have noticed nice things in on consignment/otherwise in my region and see what happens with that rather than playing into any of their politics/policies/controls/etc.

 

Sorry for the hijack, trina

 

teardrop

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interesting. Is it possible that it's only the instructer's 'policy', and not a school policy at all? If you pay double for clay ( do you also pay a firing fee ?), it's your stuff to do with as you wish.

At our school we have a student sale and give a small percentage back to the school. Every body's happy and we learn about what sells and what needs the hammer in a direct way. Maybe you need a marketing class added to the cirriculum?

 

Now to my plans for 2012, so as not to hijack this thread.

 

First off, I,m cleaning, decluttering and painting the studio. Then I'm making test tiles and testing every combination of glazes I have , and figuring out as way to hang or order the tiles for future reference.

Then I'm finally getting to work with some glazes and techniques I saw demo'ed over a year ago.

 

Broader plans, getting a supply of my best sellers stocked up ahead of time for upcoming events.

Putting larger pieces of a particular line I do in galeries in bigger cities.

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I am hoping to have time and energy to go into a new sculptural direction with porcelain paper clay. At the university I have a huge teaching load with 125 students this semester teaching 4 topics.

I find it drains my energy level. Looking forward to returning to my studio to focus.

New Years resolution: figure out the best time management for organization of lectures for classes.

Marcia

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She says it is the college's policy. Clay is a buck a pound and you must buy it there because (I'm told) the college prohibits anyone from bringing any other clay into the studio. They also prohibit "red" clays.

 

Firing is included in the class, though the instructor controls the schedule of firings. We only had one Cone 10 last semester (2 were scheduled) and the soda-fired kiln has never been fired, though it is listed in the cataolg as a part of the class experience/curriculum. Bisque/Cone 6 in the electric kilns are fired off as needed, but again, it's all on the instructor's schedule. I have another kiln full of things made here at home so far over the holiday break but I will probably let them sit til i can figure out what I am going to do about buying a kiln of my own rather than take them in for bisque/fire and hear any flack about my production level again.

 

thanks for the input.

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She says it is the college's policy. Clay is a buck a pound and you must buy it there because (I'm told) the college prohibits anyone from bringing any other clay into the studio. They also prohibit "red" clays.

 

Firing is included in the class, though the instructor controls the schedule of firings. We only had one Cone 10 last semester (2 were scheduled) and the soda-fired kiln has never been fired, though it is listed in the cataolg as a part of the class experience/curriculum. Bisque/Cone 6 in the electric kilns are fired off as needed, but again, it's all on the instructor's schedule. I have another kiln full of things made here at home so far over the holiday break but I will probably let them sit til i can figure out what I am going to do about buying a kiln of my own rather than take them in for bisque/fire and hear any flack about my production level again.

 

thanks for the input.

 

 

 

Hi this is not a hijack, I find it a really interesting topic and we should make it a topic on it's own, for some more input. I have a studio and teach it is always a bit of a problem for me for various reason... but of course hearing from students and getting suggestions would be great. Trina

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