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docweathers

An Easy Way To Get Wax Resist Off Of Bisque.

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Every time that I use wax resist on bisque I always end up getting a little bit of it in places I did not want. I think I've come up with an easy way to get it off so that glaze sticks fine. I use a square ended X-Acto knife to scrape the resist off at very low angle. If I also take just a tiny amount of the bisque off where the resist was glaze seems to stick fine.

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I find it totally depends on the clay and the glaze you're using. For transparent glazes that show every little thing, like a celadon, the only thing I have found to be acceptable is burning out the wax in another firing. For opaque or layered or runny glazes, this may work. You also have to be careful that you're not smearing the wax as you scrape it. It can be difficult to see if there's still some wax residue.

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If you are using real wax, you may find that lighter fluid a suitable solvent to remove the wax.  Use a 'q-tip' thing-m-bob to apply and wipe the lighter fluid over the area.   Try it on a test piece to prove that it works before tackling a whole pot.

 

I don't know of a reliable solvent for the latex goop. 

 

LT

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I use, depending on the situation, finger nail polish remover, exacto knife scraping and one of those big lighter things you use to start a grill to burn away the wax. If I am still unsure.... wash off the glaze and rebisque.

 

T

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I've rubbed another bisqued sherd in order to scratch it off. Mixed results

 

I've used a propane torch to burn it off.. Mixed results

 

I've waited an extra two weeks to re-bisque it. Best results!

 

But now I trim a defined foot to stop or slow down drips and to hold on to while dipping.. So about once a year I might make something that requires wax. A 6 ounce bottle lasts a lifetime! At the community college, I don't have to wait in line to wax in the hot plate, and don't freak out when there ISN'T any wax!

 

Hope this helps,

 

Alabama

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I like to use wax resist on leather hard ware, do all my fine line work and carving with underglaze or slip inlay then and then that layer is undisturbed in the glaze fire. It's much easier to clean oops wax off of leather hard. :) 

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It depends on what kind of wax and how its applied-

I keep a wet sponge handy when waxing-if you can wipe it before it dries with damp sponge before it dries its a non issue.

This has been talked about a lot

refiring gets all of it off period

 

I usually do not have to do that

I scrape and then grind with a dremill tool  highly into body then sand smooth

If the glaze crawls on that spot when glazing I repeat the steps

another tip is sand using bisque ware of same body as that dust is ground into the body in that spot.Thats after removing the wax

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this just points out another advantage of single firing.  any messy wax near the bottom or a drip somewhere is easily scraped off dry greenware.  if a tiny divot remains, a wipe with a damp sponge or a swipe with a stiff dry one and it is gone.

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Guest JBaymore

I usually retire in a kiln. I have scraped it off.

 

I know a lot of people seem to like to retire to a warm place.  But I prefer a cooler climate.  :D

 

best,

 

......................john

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Guest JBaymore

For simply keeping glaze off a foot or a lid flange and the like.... it is not all that hard to just wipe the glaze off the bisque without any wax with a really wet sponge.  Skillful application of glaze can help that task immensely.

 

For fast removal ... mount a sponge layer onto a plasti-bat and make a rotating wet sponge tool.  Add a water drip system for a slicker approach.  Not as slick as the commercial sponge units that do this.... but works OK.  Or just put a thick sponge in a tray of water so that that sponge sticks above the surface an inch or so and wipe the piece on that.

 

If you are using wax for decoration.......... the best is re-bisque it or put in a small kiln and heat up to about 700-800F.  The wax burns off.

 

best,

 

.....................john

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Be kind John, Marcia is packing a house and studio..she may well retire into a small space, and a kiln is very well insulated, a case of positive thining re. retiring to Montana!

AND Leonard Cohen is no longer here.

"If your life is a leaf that the seasons.."

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