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Stephen

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  1. Like
    Stephen got a reaction from Pyewackette in QotW: Either generally or specifically, what do you think, feel, and/or do when confronted with moderate to serious/severe limitations of some aspect of health that alters how you work in clay?    
    ya know you might suggest that they could revise the policy to allow a 'buddy' system of 2, 3 or even a small group working together during one eight hour shift and frame it as  being to broaden participation. I assume the whole point of having the wood kiln and the firing is to promote and enrich the pottery experience. There are many, many health situations that are not immediately visible that would make it impossible to 'work' an entire 8 hour strenuous shift. COPD, back issues etc etc.
    The other question that comes to mind is if the Guild is truly about mission when it come to this kiln or if some members see this wood kiln as some sort of personal domain or perc and thus inclusiveness is not really part of the agenda to begin with. 
  2. Like
    Stephen got a reaction from neilestrick in raku kiln   
    ha ha, this is Texas. We have some damn big ol grills and smokers. I think I will look around. Thanks! 
  3. Like
    Stephen got a reaction from Bill Kielb in raku kiln   
    Thanks everyone! We have decided at least for now to build a temp one and make sure we are really going to move to production. I don't weld but now might be a good time to learn
  4. Like
    Stephen reacted to neilestrick in raku kiln   
    Peter Pugger makes a really nice clamshell kiln.  I've not used it myself, but I know people who have one and they love it. Any type of kiln that is quick to open will give you better results. I don't like the type that crank up the kiln body, because it's a slower process, and you have to stand relatively close to the kiln while you do it, which is less safe. See HERE for other ideas.
  5. Like
    Stephen reacted to Bill Kielb in raku kiln   
    lots of nice kilns actually, I assume you will roll one outdoors and hold a Raku event. I had the opportunity to use the cooperworks blaze barrel kiln and they definitely have some advantages worth looking at.
    https://www.cooperworkskilns.com/kilns_raku.html
  6. Like
    Stephen reacted to Mark C. in Customer complaint: handle came off a mug   
    Customer stories-yes we have a few
    Well I have had my share in 45 years believe me but my Potter Fiend who sells more high-end stuff has the best stories. We often share hotel expenses doing out of state shows when we both do the same show. This was about 3 times a year for nearly 2 decades. Now we do not do the same shows anymore as I dropped some and he did to.
    One of the best stories is the BBQ people. His booth is built for corner and he stands behind the l shaped booth and has a great view of the show and customers whatever way he is facing. This was years ago in some high-end show in Colorado or Montana or Idaho. His works is function but has lots of designs on them like fish or frogs and some are incorporated into the handles.
    His backdrop is all walls of pro panels full of hanging platters and flat stuff as I call it. It was about 30 years into his career and he had made the largest platter of his life .It was a monster and the largest pot he had ever made and that still stands today for him. Anyway a very wealthy couple came by and took a liking to it and asked if he had any more that size. That was a clue. They did not bat an eye on the high price as Jim thought he would have this pot a long time and priced it according as to the largest platter that would ever fit in his car kiln. He wrapped it up and sent them on their way feeling great about a huge dollar sale. That was a Saturday.
    Next day he sees the couple early heading up the street towards him looking very bent out of shape. They were carrying his bag but it somehow looked smaller. They immediately said his pottery was crap and it broke on the 1stnight of use. He asked what happened. They said they filled the platter with steaks and put it on the large hot Barbeque and within minutes it broke into 4 pieces. At this point Jim knew he was dealing with people with more money than brains and he got a little steamed that the largest piece he ever made was tossed onto a hot grill. He explained thermo shock to them which was somehow a new concept to them as Adults. He told them with no certain love that they where out of line and refund did not enter the conversation. When they left all he could think of were stupid Barbeque people. Now at shows I run across people like this and we always joke about customers who now are just BBQ people after they leave.
    I had a young Kid buy a large teapot a few years ago and I asked if he wanted to know how to use it and take care of it-he looked at me like I was nut and said he knew all about it. Next day he was back and said he put it on the gas flame on the stove and it cracked. I was feeling just like Jim at that moment, as that teapot was one of my finest. At this point its not about money its about your best work abused by idiots. (sorry to be so frank) No I did not offer a refund or a deal but I gave him the lessen he blew off the day before. The thing was he really down deep knew better he said. Now you get that lesson with every teapot bought from me no ifs ands of buts. Yes I have given free pots many times and split the difference a few times. I even take a free box of seconds at Xmas to customers now and again. The customer sometimes may be a BBQ person and in those circumstances pottery does not fit well.Its up to you to see and smell the smoke  on them from the BBQ .
  7. Like
    Stephen reacted to liambesaw in Customer complaint: handle came off a mug   
    I just give a replacement.  The amount of people who would cheat some way in this situation are so minimal and are the worst people to deal with it's just not worth my trouble.  The caveat being that this is the only replacement they'll get.
    Just try not to take it as a judgement of your work.  Pottery is fragile, things like this happen, but a mug should last more than 2 months for sure.
  8. Like
    Stephen got a reaction from Roberta12 in outdoor fairs and festivals 2021   
    Road shows really add up even if you are camping or staying with someone. If a show cost a couple hundred booth fee and then you spend even another $500-$600 doing it then the first $800 of pots is just to cover those cost. Now add in the materials and time you spend making and that number goes up and then add in the actual time of doing the show (easily 30 plus hours for a weekend show) and take that now 2-3 thousand dollar number and divide it by the average price of one of your pots. That's how many pots have to sell before it means anything at all to you financially.
    You still have the time and material investment in the local shows but after the booth fee and materials you can at least convince yourself that the fun of doing it was worth working for low wages if sales are slow. Sow shows on the road mean that you actually cough up hundreds of dollars to do the show on top of low wages.
    I would stay within driving distance of your home if at all possible until you really feel like you have it figured out. If you do have to go on the road try and make it as cheap as possible until you feel like you know how the numbers will turn out. Some of the guys here have done the same shows for years and years so they can budget based on what they usually do, be very careful until you can do the same. Two or three bad shows in a row can mean basically giving away hundreds and hundreds of pots and paying cash money out the door for the privilege of doing it.
  9. Like
    Stephen reacted to GEP in outdoor fairs and festivals 2021   
    Start with small/cheap/local shows. Get your bearings in terms of logistics before you invest in anything more expensive, money-wise or time-wise. A lot of people decide that art fairs are not for them during this phase, so figure that out for yourself before you go any further. 
    During the early years, you will redesign and rebuild your display a few times. So don’t sink too much money on it at this stage.  
    Here’s my blog series that will provide more detailed answers to your questions. It’s not really aimed for newcomers, but it can help a newcomer visualize what direction to go. 
    https://www.goodelephant.com/blog/category/the-art-festival-plan
  10. Like
    Stephen got a reaction from Ayelet in Vacuum cleaner for the clay studio, yes or no?   
    sorry not by shop for pic but just search in google on dust deputy or dust stopper and you will see a bunch of examples of each. The dust deputy sits between the hose in and the shop vac and I find it reduces (by a lot) the dust that gets to the shop vac.  I use it though to pull plaster dust off a CNC router that is in a sealed enclosure. Without the dust stopper the shop vac was putting out some dust out into the studio and when I added this that stopped. I do wood and pottery and have a larger dust collection system for my wood working tools.
     Another way to go if you have an outside door is to just get a large shop vac and buy a really long hose and sit the shop vac outside. 
    No doubt bill knows what he's talking about so for sure take that into account. My shop vac is hepa rated, not sure about the dust collector. I do know that there is no residual dust at all from hours of cnc cutting plaster so there's that. 
    Hope that helps, good luck! 
     
  11. Like
    Stephen got a reaction from rox54 in Advice for a new business.   
    Ya know I wouldn't stress to much more on the site. I know some people here are doing more from their sites since the pandemic but the verdict is still out on if that will continue. As far as I can tell before that no one here really made any (much) money from their website's and most pottery websites are more of a brochure than selling platform. If I were you, based on your original post, I would call it good for now and concentrate on the stuff that will make a difference in your new business. Like Callie said the site is an ongoing project and you can always come back and dink around with it some more when everything else has settled down. Just my two cents.
  12. Like
    Stephen got a reaction from Ayelet in Vacuum cleaner for the clay studio, yes or no?   
    hey congrats on the buy, sounds like a nice vac.
    If you are still worried about the dust you can add a dust separator such as a dust deputy or Rockler dust right. I bought the home depot one (dust stopper). Most are under a $100 and since you have a long hose you can probably just set the vac centrally and the dust separator next to it and connect the hose to the dust separator and it to the vac.  on mine everything is 2 1/2" so didn't need any extra pieces. That will eliminate almost all of the dust even getting to the vac and thus pretty much eliminate the issue since there is nothing coming into the vac to speak of and the vac itself can be positioned where the exhaust air is not stirring anything up.
    Edit:
    Not sure if my approach is needed as many potters work in studios for years and years without having health issues from clay dust. I have been getting an education on this stuff because I am trying to completely eliminate plaster dust I create cutting molds and the dust we generate from clay in the studio since we are in there a lot of hours these days and its a small 600 foot space. The plaster dust is a danger to our pottery and the clay dust to us. The HEPA filters on shop vacs are better than nothing but extreme dust with shop vacs has some real limitations.  You also need to make sure they are changed frequently.
    The closest discussion I could find for plaster/silica was drywall and apparently many of the HEPA filters found in common shop vacs will handle fine dust like this poorly.  Shop vacs will generally exhaust dust it can't process so the finer stuff may still just exhust back into the air and the vac will also will stir up dust with the exhaust air as its moved around the studio (Liam brought this up above) so using one as a dust collection system has some limitations to consider. Also the CFM (sucking power) of many of them is not enough to move fine dust. You want to try to get above 150 CFM and closer to 175 if you can. That is usually a pretty big shop Vac.
    I want to completely eliminate any plaster dust I create and I also want to clean clay dust up without blowing it all over the place as I move around so the dust separator is where I landed. On Amazon you can buy longer hoses for pretty cheap (2 1/2 inch ones are common) and as I said you can then leave the setup sitting in one spot. The dust separators can also be on wheels easily so it and the shop vac can be moved around a bit to cover the whole studio as you vacuum and mop.
    Just a though but I must admit I do really like being in my studio more with the layer of dust eliminated.
     
  13. Like
    Stephen got a reaction from rox54 in Advice for a new business.   
    Ah you guys are tough. I didn't even look at that as an issue but rather a style thing. Once I scrolled the page into view the menu works as expected and it seems to me that responsive designs are always quirky .  I write web apps for the day job and hate responsive phone coding. Make one look nice and the other doesn't without dinking around. Wish adaptive had won out because platforms IMHO should be individually optimized if it matters or just go with mobile friendly. Phones are so big these days just going with mobile friendly with the same design on both is just fine.  But I am an old man who came up writing desktop applications in the 80's so I am not on the cutting edge, just the edge. 
  14. Like
    Stephen got a reaction from rox54 in Advice for a new business.   
    worked fine on my phone. I do notice that when going to menu items there is a bit of blank page and the page starts an inch or two down but is definitely switching to mobile view on my phone, Samsung Note using chrome.
  15. Like
    Stephen reacted to Mark C. in Advice for a new business.   
    Rox 
    As a group we all have our areas of expertise and we all want everyone to succeed in clay whatever that means to each. Many of us have stepped into potholes  over time that we can try to advise others to avoid. We are all clay lovers and want each to make their own way and be successful .You are now one of us in this quest.
  16. Like
    Stephen got a reaction from Bill Kielb in Taxes, what should I expect?   
    looks like you have lots of good advice. Thought I'd throw out our experience since we also combine the pottery business with W2 income for me and also have an LLC with business insurance (all things you mentioned). If you make less than I think $600 I don't think you need to do anything unless you want to write off equipment and/or expenses. If it is a hobby business then you should go to the IRS website and read up on that because you can only write off some stuff with that designation.
    I'm in Texas and we are an LLC, have a sales tax id from the sate, work from a home studio in a garage and have business insurance through a commercial insurance company. If your kilns burn down your house your regular insurance and/or home owners  will not cover your house if you sell anything from your home studio. I am pretty sure that is true no matter where you live in the country. I trusted my agent when he said it was fine but when I moved from WA to TX and pushed for clarification Allstate made it clear that it we sold stuff my homeowners would not cover it if the damage was caused by the studio. It cost us about $800 a year to have the insurance but we also have some riders added to cover some show liability, some lost sales and some inventory value as well as just covering incident damage.
    I file our personal taxes jointly using Turbo tax small business edition online and the business income is on a schedule C on our 1040. No employees and no federal tax ID. I have had an in-house comptroller/book keeper and an outside corporate accountant in my day life so I get the value of that and if that's the way you want to go then don't read the rest of this post, just keep your receipts and hand them over at tax time with your Esty reports and it will be easy once your guy sets everything up.
    .... I only spend an evening each year dealing with our taxes and we just have a few quarterly reports for the local stuff so if you are pretty savy working with basic numbers its certainly doable on your own and, at least with us, not worth the expense of outside help.
    Since I felt just fine doing my own I started doing ours on TurboTax have never felt a need to do anything else. When we started selling as a business I converted all the studio equipment to business equipment using market value so I could then take advantage of being able to depreciate it. We had about 20k of stuff to depreciate and in the aftermath of the 2008 financial crisis there were some extra benefits for a few years so it did matter. If you have existing equipment you bought for personal use in the past you can convert it to business use and then write it off every year on a schedule based on what it is.  Any new studio equipment beyond consumables and small incidentals and hand tools you will need to write off like this as well.
    Turbo tax small business handles all of this with just a few questions answered so you don't need to do anything but tell it about the equipment and what the cost or market value is and it does the rest. It will ask you every year if you bought anything.
    We have pretty much all the same expenses and categories each year so we just keep an envelope with all the receipts that are not online and I pull it together and knock it out in an evening. Texas does not have personal income taxes but I think it will handle Oregon State stuff as well.
    The feds don't care about the LLC and you don't need to report anything until you have income over I think $600 unless you want to have write-offs and I think $400 or so before dealing with self employment if you just file as a sole proprietor. A single member LLC (husband and wife qualify as single) you can file for federal income tax purposes as a sole proprietor if you want to and you probably do.
    TurboTax deals with the self employment as well. If you start making a lot of dough (10's of thousands) you will at some point need to pay that quarterly. I do that with a direct pay from bank to the IRS website and its not hard to set up and a few clicks but you only do that the first year following clearing a certain threshold and Turbo tax will clue you in when you need to. 
    Good luck. My sister-in-law just opened on Esty with fused glass work and had several dozen sales her first month. She took advantage of all the marketing options and at the end of the day it all added up to about 30% of sales so not bad.
  17. Like
    Stephen got a reaction from liambesaw in Taxes, what should I expect?   
    looks like you have lots of good advice. Thought I'd throw out our experience since we also combine the pottery business with W2 income for me and also have an LLC with business insurance (all things you mentioned). If you make less than I think $600 I don't think you need to do anything unless you want to write off equipment and/or expenses. If it is a hobby business then you should go to the IRS website and read up on that because you can only write off some stuff with that designation.
    I'm in Texas and we are an LLC, have a sales tax id from the sate, work from a home studio in a garage and have business insurance through a commercial insurance company. If your kilns burn down your house your regular insurance and/or home owners  will not cover your house if you sell anything from your home studio. I am pretty sure that is true no matter where you live in the country. I trusted my agent when he said it was fine but when I moved from WA to TX and pushed for clarification Allstate made it clear that it we sold stuff my homeowners would not cover it if the damage was caused by the studio. It cost us about $800 a year to have the insurance but we also have some riders added to cover some show liability, some lost sales and some inventory value as well as just covering incident damage.
    I file our personal taxes jointly using Turbo tax small business edition online and the business income is on a schedule C on our 1040. No employees and no federal tax ID. I have had an in-house comptroller/book keeper and an outside corporate accountant in my day life so I get the value of that and if that's the way you want to go then don't read the rest of this post, just keep your receipts and hand them over at tax time with your Esty reports and it will be easy once your guy sets everything up.
    .... I only spend an evening each year dealing with our taxes and we just have a few quarterly reports for the local stuff so if you are pretty savy working with basic numbers its certainly doable on your own and, at least with us, not worth the expense of outside help.
    Since I felt just fine doing my own I started doing ours on TurboTax have never felt a need to do anything else. When we started selling as a business I converted all the studio equipment to business equipment using market value so I could then take advantage of being able to depreciate it. We had about 20k of stuff to depreciate and in the aftermath of the 2008 financial crisis there were some extra benefits for a few years so it did matter. If you have existing equipment you bought for personal use in the past you can convert it to business use and then write it off every year on a schedule based on what it is.  Any new studio equipment beyond consumables and small incidentals and hand tools you will need to write off like this as well.
    Turbo tax small business handles all of this with just a few questions answered so you don't need to do anything but tell it about the equipment and what the cost or market value is and it does the rest. It will ask you every year if you bought anything.
    We have pretty much all the same expenses and categories each year so we just keep an envelope with all the receipts that are not online and I pull it together and knock it out in an evening. Texas does not have personal income taxes but I think it will handle Oregon State stuff as well.
    The feds don't care about the LLC and you don't need to report anything until you have income over I think $600 unless you want to have write-offs and I think $400 or so before dealing with self employment if you just file as a sole proprietor. A single member LLC (husband and wife qualify as single) you can file for federal income tax purposes as a sole proprietor if you want to and you probably do.
    TurboTax deals with the self employment as well. If you start making a lot of dough (10's of thousands) you will at some point need to pay that quarterly. I do that with a direct pay from bank to the IRS website and its not hard to set up and a few clicks but you only do that the first year following clearing a certain threshold and Turbo tax will clue you in when you need to. 
    Good luck. My sister-in-law just opened on Esty with fused glass work and had several dozen sales her first month. She took advantage of all the marketing options and at the end of the day it all added up to about 30% of sales so not bad.
  18. Like
    Stephen reacted to neilestrick in 4 month lead time on new kilns...   
    Before you buy- have you looked at the Genesis controller or Quad element upgrades, and does the Clay-King kiln have them? I highly recommend both. The Genesis is a cheap upgrade and has a lot more functionality than the Dynatrol- it's much easier to use for custom programs, has a lot more diagnostic features, connects to wi-fi for software upgrades, and has an app for monitoring firings when you're away from your kiln. The Quad element design will almost double the element life, thus paying for itself and reducing maintenance time/costs.
    Remember that your kiln will last 20-30 years or more with proper care. Don't rush into getting somethings that's not exactly what you want.
  19. Like
    Stephen got a reaction from Magnolia Mud Research in 4 month lead time on new kilns...   
    With pottery if you can get clay you can start doing stuff 10 minutes later, seriously. From your post I can't tell how experienced you are or if this is a new studio so if you are an experienced potter with a studio already then ignore my post as it will likely just be annoying
    ...but if you are new then I'd advise you to just pick the right kiln for your work, order it and then just do other stuff until its installed. Of all the things to have to wait for a kiln would bother me the least. Just make stuff and prep it for the kiln and then when it comes in you will have a few bone dry loads ready to fire. A few months will go pretty fast. Are there some other things that you can do to get ready directly for the kiln? Is the electrical installed and ready? If not then once you order then you have those specs and can get an electrician for that scheduled and done. Do you have drying racks, work tables, etc
    Good luck, if you just have to have it right now, I agree with others that a 10 year old kiln is really not that old. 
  20. Like
    Stephen got a reaction from akilspots in Starting up in a big way.   
    hey I get it. Might work, might not and like you said, you are willing to accept the downside. I would just say that there is no reason to kick in such a gradiose plan before starting the business and selling some pots. An art business is still a business and if you havent sold anything in a long time then you will have a lot to work out. Here's the thing, you say a year and a half but its really less than that because you cant actually spend to nothing. I tried that and it was really stupid. I was very lucky that I got a programming contract right when I ran out of dough and they paid on invoice or I would have been scewed. I sold a lot of pots but trying to get to thousands a month to pay all of my bills and the business bills was a hill to high for me and a string of out of town shows ( using an RV ) that barely broke even burned through a lot of cash really fast and I was looking at another string of shows with thousands in new cost and it just fell a part quickly. That was close to five years ago now. I was up to 2am twice this week and I am generally in the studio working by 6ish and stop at 9ish for the day job. Work at home so no commute really helps. I really think I will be working two full time for a while and this time there is no way will I quit the day job until pottery is making as much or more than I make programming and its a pretty decent salary. I dont want to make less money just want to make it with pottery and I am determined to do it. 
    None of that means you should do it the way I am just thought it might help knowing someone else journey. There are so many different ways to get where you want to go and I've learned the hard way that sometimes it can take a bit to break through. All or nothing can work but it can also be defeating and set up a time to fail. I guess after almost a decade I just dont see a year and a half as a likely time frame. The first things you do may not work. The first string of shows may not clear enough over expenses to start a paycheck and may even just drain your account more. Slow and steady works. Building revenue works. I would try to get past the living a dream feeling and progress to making production list, sign up and do shows when this virus passes and build a business plan. Since we cant do shows right now we are concentrating on re launching our website with a new product line and building inventory foe when we can. You can do a lot by June but why make that a line in the sand. You say whats the worst that can happen and I say that is spending a lot of cash a lot faster than you thought you would. Transitioning with a part time job is great . Maybe a year getting to a good starting point with a lot of the business decisions worked out and some part time pottery revenue actually hitting your bank account would be worth considering.
    But however you do it I wish you nothing but sucess!
  21. Like
    Stephen reacted to Pat B. in Buying a used kiln   
    I'm the OP and I'm grateful for all the comments. I'm really glad I asked your opinion, I've learned a lot.
    I've let the seller know that I'm backing out of the deal. I said that I was advised that the vent might fail which would cost me $400-$500 and if the wiring needs to be replaced it's another couple hundred. Also she should consider what she originally paid (I know she has the invoice) and lower the price to some percentage of that. If she came back with $800 I would probably buy it.
    At this point I'm looking to finance a new kiln instead of buying her old one.
    Thank you everyone for your input.
  22. Like
    Stephen got a reaction from Jchern010 in First Studio Equipment Suggestions   
    hey congrad. Couple of thoughts to add to all the great advice.
    Wheels, I am hard of hearing so love the Shimpo whispers we have,  very quiet and work great. Have been some complaints here on torque on higher weights but we dont throw huge pots and have never noticed a problem. I've used Brent, Shimpo and a clayboss for 6 months. 
    kiln, We have a 9cf oval and a skutt 1027. I think the  7cf 1027 is the most popular small studio kiln. Love the way skutt is built. The round kilns though make large platters a challenge so if you are going to do platters you might look at what size and consider that. Going big might sound smart for future but I would think it through. For instance the  7cf holds about 50 or so larger mugs and the oval closer to 70 so if you throw mostly small things on a regular basis then as a hobbist it will take some time to build a load for firing. Like Neil pointed out the 18" round kilns make some pots a challenge but most of the brands make a two ring shorter 23" that is smaller. It prob comes down to if you don't mind just firing every few months. I would put in a kiln vent. The shop will get very very hot so think about that with the stuff sitting out and consider backer board on the walls if its near any. Ours are in the studio so I always make sure all clay stuff is covered except bone dry and we fire overnight. One of the web cams will make your life easier for checking you kiln from your phone. I check the firing every few hours just because.
    We got a de-airing pugmill mixer from the start and it has been fantastic. If its been a while since you have thrown it will be very liberating to just toss pieces at first in recycle without any thought on the work to get it back to throwing shape and as you go it will save a lot of time when you get some hard clay. We throw from the pugger without wedging so saves your wrist too. We have a peter pogger 9.
    our slab roller is a shimpo and is a table model. Also own a small counter top one but its more of a hassle to use. Very convient to just toss a pug down, I dial it down as I repeatly run it through and have a slab in just a moment or two ready to work with.
    We have a couple wall mount extruders one is round and one is square. Lots of cool possibilties and we extrude all handles. Great compression and never have any cracks. 
    Also have a recirculating sink and I will say that I took it to storage to make some room when we moved our studio to a new place with convient water for buckets. But when We had a studio a hundred feet from water we used that a lot. A little pricy but it really is as good as running water for a clay studio.
    We have a few rolling bakers carts with plastic zip covers. Use 3/4 ply as shelves. Work great and can slow drying down when you want. 
    I woul'nt get too hung up on brands as long as its from a legit pottery supply house and not Amazon. Clay king, Sheffield, Baileys, The Ceramic shop are all legit. Dick Blick is great. The studio equipment by the major brand is built so well that most of these option will be fine. I find people mostly rave about the stuff they bought. When you drop 12-1500 for a pottery wheel you want to feel like its the best.
    have fun, try not to over spend. An old kiln and wheel, rolling pin and expired credit card for throwing tool will make great pots. We spend the dough just to make it easier.
  23. Like
    Stephen reacted to GEP in 2021 Shows and Beyond   
    I never said I would be sitting around doing nothing. I like being busy. I have plans. 
  24. Like
    Stephen reacted to Mark C. in 2021 Shows and Beyond   
    I do not plan on walking away-its just the show part that will go first as shows are the hardest. I then still have 9 outlets some moving large volumes of work some not so large  locally. Those I will pair  down over time. I have no plans to be done with pottery. I like being a potter and I think that will always be my driver. The work routine is part of that.
  25. Like
    Stephen got a reaction from Roberta12 in 2021 Shows and Beyond   
    ya know maybe you guys should rethink it a bit. Does retiring have to be a complete walk away? Maybe retiring is just changing what you do. Maybe your pottery moves more toward something that shakes things up and is less about paying bills and more about enjoyment. We have talked about when we get past the age we want to be lifting 50 pound boxes of clay moving to Egyptian Paste Jewelry and other small items.
    Retirement that I've seen seems to be best with a work routine of some sort. I don't know why but it seems the happiest and healthiest old people in my family have been the ones with a schedule to keep.  
       
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