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Why Earthenware?


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#1 potziller

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Posted 20 August 2013 - 02:46 AM

Hi folks,

Stoneware: it's stronger, less porous and far more commonly referenced as a potting material than earthenware - so why would i want to use an earthenware clay body?

V :)
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#2 trina

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Posted 20 August 2013 - 03:04 AM

just cuz.....hahaha actually stoneware is not stronger, and stoneware only vitrifes when you fire it to maturity otherwise its basically earthware with grog.. I know that Offcentre had an interesting post about this maybe he will chime in , tell me that i don't know what I am on about ;) and point you in the right direction..T

#3 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 20 August 2013 - 06:30 AM

Trina is correct. When fired to maturity, earthenware is as strong or stronger than stoneware.
Also, I would say earthenware is universally used more often than stoneware on a worldwide scale.

Marcia

#4 atanzey

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Posted 20 August 2013 - 06:39 AM

And while we can't speak to why YOU would want to use it, the choice often lies in the firing limitations. It's easier (and less expensive) to get to earthenware temperatures.

 

Alice



#5 OffCenter

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Posted 20 August 2013 - 09:07 AM

Hi folks,

Stoneware: it's stronger, less porous and far more commonly referenced as a potting material than earthenware - so why would i want to use an earthenware clay body?

V :)
 attachicon.gifsundogred.jpg

 

When I saw the above nonsense, I thought Oh crap, here we go again, I gotta dig out the Pinnell MOR test results, etc., but thanks to Trina and Marcia I can go pick muscadines instead.

 

Jim


E pur si muove.

"But it does move," said Galileo under his breath.

#6 clay lover

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Posted 20 August 2013 - 09:09 AM

That can only be used as an excuse if you then make muscadine wine. 



#7 trina

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Posted 20 August 2013 - 09:13 AM

and Jim if you choose to distil, make sure you don't blind yourself...T

#8 OffCenter

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Posted 20 August 2013 - 09:23 AM

Clay Lover and Trina, I do, indeed, intend to make muscadine wine this year for the first time. I've had to drink a lot of wine to save up bottles.

 

Jim


E pur si muove.

"But it does move," said Galileo under his breath.

#9 timbo_heff

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Posted 20 August 2013 - 11:27 AM

The porosity of earthenware is desirable in some cases such as in a desert water vessle: the evaporating water, through the process of evaopative cooling actually cools the water in the vessel. Terra cotta chicken roasters work well too if you soak them in water before cooking: they give of the moisture and add some steam to the cooking.



#10 perkolator

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Posted 20 August 2013 - 03:15 PM

the issue is not necessarily always about fired strength or vitrification - since you can achieve both at either temp.  there is however a pretty good difference in energy cost, firing time, wear on kiln, color palette, etc. between the two firing ranges.



#11 trina

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Posted 20 August 2013 - 03:29 PM

Clay Lover and Trina, I do, indeed, intend to make muscadine wine this year for the first time. I've had to drink a lot of wine to save up bottles.
 
Jim


that was your first mistake, you should have consumed an oak barrel of brandy to put the wine into. makes it taste way better, and don't let anyone put you off adding a bit of yeast to the mix, it makes for a better colour....T

#12 stephsteph

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Posted 21 August 2013 - 01:18 AM

all i can say is look at the marvelous history of pottery. look at the pottery produced in cultures all over the world , from the deep past to the hip present. Everywhere you will find lovely ,gorgeous , functional earthenware.


Stephani Stephenson

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#13 oldlady

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Posted 23 August 2013 - 10:46 AM

stephsteph, just looked at your website.  beautiful tiles, wonderful sculpture.  

 

wish you were closer, i have several boxes of hestia to give someone.


"putting you down does not raise me up."

#14 Frederik-W

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Posted 23 August 2013 - 11:08 PM

Earthenware requires far less energy to fire,

so you save on electricity, you save on greenhouse gasses and you help save the planet.

Your kiln and kiln elements will last much longer with earthenware.

Many colours come out brighter for earthenware.

Bisque and glaze firing temperatures for earthenware are so close that you can sometimes combine green and glaze ware and in one firing.

 

Many potters fire stoneware by default, for no good reason. What a waste.



#15 Wyndham

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Posted 24 August 2013 - 09:30 AM

Just don't use tell folks it's good for microwave. The porosity allows water in the ware and will burn the stuffens out of your hand picking up a mug from the MW.(as will under fired stoneware)

 

Folks then think all pottery is not MW -able and their eyes glaze over when you tell them about all this stuff.

Wyndham



#16 trina

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Posted 24 August 2013 - 09:49 AM

my eyes are glazing over even as we speak....T

#17 TheSmartCat

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Posted 24 August 2013 - 11:30 AM

Just don't use tell folks it's good for microwave. The porosity allows water in the ware and will burn the stuffens out of your hand picking up a mug from the MW.(as will under fired stoneware)

 

Folks then think all pottery is not MW -able and their eyes glaze over when you tell them about all this stuff.

Wyndham

It depends on the body.  I have earthenware that I put in the microwave successfully; other low-fire bodies are completely no go.  Whites in particular will burn your fingers off.  It's necessary to test...a lot.



#18 Wyndham

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Posted 24 August 2013 - 04:04 PM

What earthenware clay body, just curious that can take a MW nuke?

Wyndham



#19 potziller

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Posted 26 August 2013 - 05:02 PM

 

Hi folks,

Stoneware: it's stronger, less porous and far more commonly referenced as a potting material than earthenware - so why would i want to use an earthenware clay body?

V :)
 attachicon.gifsundogred.jpg

 

When I saw the above nonsense, I thought Oh crap, here we go again, I gotta dig out the Pinnell MOR test results, etc., but thanks to Trina and Marcia I can go pick muscadines instead.

 

Jim

 

Well Jim, if you're just going to be rude, please don't bother replying.  And if I simple get folk using this forum to be rude and not answer questions, then tell me, what is the point of joining and using 'a forum'.  If you ain't got anything constructive to say,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,!



#20 bciskepottery

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Posted 26 August 2013 - 10:22 PM

Here's a link to a good handout from Linda Arbuckle on earthenware.  http://lindaarbuckle...earthenware.pdf  Actually, her handouts page is a great source of information for potters. 






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