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Where to find used wheels

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I am fresh out of college and looking to start putting together a small studio space. And as a recent graduate, I have a really tight budget. I have been searching all over the internet for used wheels in pretty good condition for a fair price, but it seems like I am trying to find a needle in a hay stack. Most of my search results come up as children's toy pottery wheels! I have heard a good place to get used wheels is from public school auctions. But how do I find one? Are there any other good places to find used wheels?

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Mesi    3

Put out an APB to everyone you know. I got a free kiln this way. At least around where I am there are a lot of people with ceramic supplies left in their garage after they tried in in the 70s. I've also found them on craigslist. Or, check out publicsurplus.com. Sad sign of our times, but many schools are getting rid of their art programs and auctioning things off. Just last week I got a nice little Shimpo for $50 off this site.

 

Just know that with any used equipment, regardless of where you get it, it is very much "as is". You will almost definitely do a little bit of leg work figuring out what's wrong with it after you get it, and determining how to fix it or live with it.

 

 

 

 

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Put out an APB to everyone you know. I got a free kiln this way. At least around where I am there are a lot of people with ceramic supplies left in their garage after they tried in in the 70s. I've also found them on craigslist. Or, check out publicsurplus.com. Sad sign of our times, but many schools are getting rid of their art programs and auctioning things off. Just last week I got a nice little Shimpo for $50 off this site.

 

Just know that with any used equipment, regardless of where you get it, it is very much "as is". You will almost definitely do a little bit of leg work figuring out what's wrong with it after you get it, and determining how to fix it or live with it.

 

 

 

-Craigslist--you can search your local site and sites in a specified radius by using searchtempest.com

-govdeals.com-more public surplus auctions, if you're looking for wheels they are almost always in the arts and crafts section, I have seen kilns of all stripes listed as furnaces in other sections, and slab rollers listed as printing presses listed in the printing and binding section.

 

where are you located, geographically?

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Benzine    610

Put out an APB to everyone you know. I got a free kiln this way. At least around where I am there are a lot of people with ceramic supplies left in their garage after they tried in in the 70s. I've also found them on craigslist. Or, check out publicsurplus.com. Sad sign of our times, but many schools are getting rid of their art programs and auctioning things off. Just last week I got a nice little Shimpo for $50 off this site.

 

Just know that with any used equipment, regardless of where you get it, it is very much "as is". You will almost definitely do a little bit of leg work figuring out what's wrong with it after you get it, and determining how to fix it or live with it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Doh! Where am I, when these deals come up? I've been looking to get a nice electric wheel for a while now, and no luck yet. I've been checking eBay daily. Sadly, most people on there, seem to over-estimate what they have. I haven't seen a wheel on there, go for less than two or three hundred.

 

I haven't had success with Craig's List either. I'll check out the other two sites mentioned.

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Denice    243

Once in a while you'll see one on Potterbarter.com but it would only be handy if it was in a city nearby. My clay supply store sometimes have them and I find pottery equipment at estate sales but usually it's kilns. You might join a local artists group and make some connection with other local potters, maybe they can help. Denice

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Once in a while you'll see one on Potterbarter.com but it would only be handy if it was in a city nearby. My clay supply store sometimes have them and I find pottery equipment at estate sales but usually it's kilns. You might join a local artists group and make some connection with other local potters, maybe they can help. Denice

 

 

potterbarter.com doesnt seem to resolve as a valid DNS entry--are you sure thats the correct address?

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bciskepottery    925

Once in a while you'll see one on Potterbarter.com but it would only be handy if it was in a city nearby. My clay supply store sometimes have them and I find pottery equipment at estate sales but usually it's kilns. You might join a local artists group and make some connection with other local potters, maybe they can help. Denice

 

 

potterbarter.com doesnt seem to resolve as a valid DNS entry--are you sure thats the correct address?

 

 

 

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/potterbarter/?v=1&t=directory&ch=web&pub=groups&sec=dir&slk=1

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TJR    359

Newbie;

I think you have to go word of mouth. I know of a Brent kick wheel for sale for $100.00. No motor though. I know of another free kick wheel in someone's basement, ready to be hauled away. People don't seem to advertise these wheels for sale. They just sit. My local clay supplier has them sometimes, but they will want a cut.What about putting up an advert at your school?

TJR.

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SShirley    9

I found a Clay Boss quite by accident at a garage sale. Practically unused, too. $100. It wasn't my first choice for brand, but the price was right. And I just missed a kick wheel for $50, but somebody got it first. I think there have been a few here because this is a college town, and people take a class, get pumped up, buy some equipment, and then lose interest.

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I have just been in your exact situation but luckily I asked around and ended up getting a good wheel from a friend of a friend, this seems to be the best way to get a cheap wheel. Just ask anybody and everybody you never know what might come from it.

 

Another idea I looked into was creating a

. Just another thing you could think about as you might be able to salvage most of the things you need.

Good luck in your hunt

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Pres    896

I am fresh out of college and looking to start putting together a small studio space. And as a recent graduate, I have a really tight budget. I have been searching all over the internet for used wheels in pretty good condition for a fair price, but it seems like I am trying to find a needle in a hay stack. Most of my search results come up as children's toy pottery wheels! I have heard a good place to get used wheels is from public school auctions. But how do I find one? Are there any other good places to find used wheels?

 

 

When I was teaching, I replaced two of our wheels with direct drive wheels. Both of the older wheels were kick wheels with motors-the new wheels were Bailey"s. Both of the old wheels were going to the scrap yard, and I told the man in charge of dispositions to sell them. They both went for $100 each. I also sold an old 2 speed Amaco table top in the same way-same price. I got my first wheel from a local private school that replaced their old Amaco kick with new Brent B's for $125. I know of a college that closed down their Ceramics program, and had stored their wheels Brent C's. Moral of the story is check with local schools, keep a good working relationship with them, you might be surprised!

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AtomicAxe    19

public school wheels are ussually trashed by the time you get to them. When I was actively buying equipment for my studio in college, I would go to estate sales. Normally, if there were things like kilns, wheels, extruders, etc ... it was something the people holding the estate sale wouldn't know how to sell or price. If you see tools or art supplies, ask about if they have equipment. At one time I had 6 shimpo wheels that I got in practically dead condition for next to nothing, threw a new 2 hp motor in them, stripped the rust and repainted them and they ran better than originally manufactured. Most I ever spent on one was $100 from the person. Elbow grease and ingenuity will let you go farther than just a hunk of cash.

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Denice    243

Try potterbarter@yahoogroups.com I think that might work, you have to subscribe, no fee is required. Denice

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Mark C.    1,800

You need to check ceramic supply info boards as well if you live near any?-Our local suppier has a board on the wall with folks used kilns and the like.

The potterbarter site is a yahoo group I belong to and wheels come and go you should join up its free as noted above-The best way is ask everyone you know and get the word out-check craigs list in nearby cities or counties.

Mark

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Pres    896

public school wheels are ussually trashed by the time you get to them. When I was actively buying equipment for my studio in college, I would go to estate sales. Normally, if there were things like kilns, wheels, extruders, etc ... it was something the people holding the estate sale wouldn't know how to sell or price. If you see tools or art supplies, ask about if they have equipment. At one time I had 6 shimpo wheels that I got in practically dead condition for next to nothing, threw a new 2 hp motor in them, stripped the rust and repainted them and they ran better than originally manufactured. Most I ever spent on one was $100 from the person. Elbow grease and ingenuity will let you go farther than just a hunk of cash.

 

 

Usually is the correct word, as the wheels I got rid of were removed because of the amount of space they took up or the type of wheel they were. All three were well maintained kept clean, everything in working order. Many high school teachers are in the same boat, they get a piece of equipment they know they won't get another so they maintain it. Newer wheels came out years ago that took less space, were easier to learn on, and were actually easier to maintain, so many of us replaced the older larger ones.

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Benzine    610

public school wheels are ussually trashed by the time you get to them. When I was actively buying equipment for my studio in college, I would go to estate sales. Normally, if there were things like kilns, wheels, extruders, etc ... it was something the people holding the estate sale wouldn't know how to sell or price. If you see tools or art supplies, ask about if they have equipment. At one time I had 6 shimpo wheels that I got in practically dead condition for next to nothing, threw a new 2 hp motor in them, stripped the rust and repainted them and they ran better than originally manufactured. Most I ever spent on one was $100 from the person. Elbow grease and ingenuity will let you go farther than just a hunk of cash.

 

 

Usually is the correct word, as the wheels I got rid of were removed because of the amount of space they took up or the type of wheel they were. All three were well maintained kept clean, everything in working order. Many high school teachers are in the same boat, they get a piece of equipment they know they won't get another so they maintain it. Newer wheels came out years ago that took less space, were easier to learn on, and were actually easier to maintain, so many of us replaced the older larger ones.

 

 

Yes indeed. I'm trying to get rid of a larger kick wheel, from my class myself. It takes up more space, than I can offer.....next on the list, is the odd treadle wheel....That thing is just odd.

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Strelnikov    2

There seems to be a lot of used kilns available compared to used pottery wheels. After looking at a few overpriced (in our opinion) local pottery wheels we finally bought a new Skutt wheel from the local dealer. It was expensive but we are very happy with it.

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Biglou13    202

+1. For search tempest / Craig's list.

I got one for FREE dollars plus a 2 hour drive. I'm living proof it works. The good deals go fast so do search a couple times a day.

Treadle wheel. Me likes. What part of country do live? Maybe some one here will have a connection for you.

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+1. For search tempest / Craig's list.

I got one for FREE dollars plus a 2 hour drive. I'm living proof it works. The good deals go fast so do search a couple times a day.

Treadle wheel. Me likes. What part of country do live? Maybe some one here will have a connection for you.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I am currently living in Northeast OH, but am looking to move to the Lansing, MI area in August. It sounds like I might be looking a little too early if I want to get something in MI rather than buying something here and then having to haul it up with everything else. Does anyone know of schools, individuals, or ceramic surplus looking to sell wheels in the Lansing area?

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Jlinett    0

I am fresh out of college and looking to start putting together a small studio space. And as a recent graduate, I have a really tight budget. I have been searching all over the internet for used wheels in pretty good condition for a fair price, but it seems like I am trying to find a needle in a hay stack. Most of my search results come up as children's toy pottery wheels! I have heard a good place to get used wheels is from public school auctions. But how do I find one? Are there any other good places to find used wheels?

 

 

I have a kick wheel I no longer use. It takes up a lot of space,but works great. It's a home built wheel that I bought several years ago from its builder in NY. he was an art school grad so knew what he was doing functionally with the design, but it is not pretty. A lot of 2 X 8 boards and bits and pieces, with carriage bolts to hold it together. I upgraded the seat, though. He was over 6 feet tall and my short legs wouldn't reach. so I took apart an office chair and mounted it on the frame. My knees can't do it any more so I got an electric wheel. It is in Delaware. I would give it to a new home, but it would have to be picked up. Also, when I took it apart I took photos at each stage, thinking they could be used to reassemble it. If nothing else the aluminum flywheel and wheel head are in excellent condition, very straight shaft and well balanced. I've been meaning to list it on Craig's but haven't yet. T hen I saw your plea!

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jchace    0

public school wheels are ussually trashed by the time you get to them. When I was actively buying equipment for my studio in college, I would go to estate sales. Normally, if there were things like kilns, wheels, extruders, etc ... it was something the people holding the estate sale wouldn't know how to sell or price. If you see tools or art supplies, ask about if they have equipment. At one time I had 6 shimpo wheels that I got in practically dead condition for next to nothing, threw a new 2 hp motor in them, stripped the rust and repainted them and they ran better than originally manufactured. Most I ever spent on one was $100 from the person. Elbow grease and ingenuity will let you go farther than just a hunk of cash.

 

 

Usually is the correct word, as the wheels I got rid of were removed because of the amount of space they took up or the type of wheel they were. All three were well maintained kept clean, everything in working order. Many high school teachers are in the same boat, they get a piece of equipment they know they won't get another so they maintain it. Newer wheels came out years ago that took less space, were easier to learn on, and were actually easier to maintain, so many of us replaced the older larger ones.

 

 

Yes indeed. I'm trying to get rid of a larger kick wheel, from my class myself. It takes up more space, than I can offer.....next on the list, is the odd treadle wheel....That thing is just odd.

 

 

Where are you located, Benzine? I am new, also looking for a wheel and I am in Gloucester MA. Doesn't hurt to ask

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Mesi    3

That public surplus website I posted had a number of wheels in SE Michigan (thats where I'm at). I know Macomb Community College was selling off about a dozen.

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AtomicAxe    19

public school wheels are ussually trashed by the time you get to them. When I was actively buying equipment for my studio in college, I would go to estate sales. Normally, if there were things like kilns, wheels, extruders, etc ... it was something the people holding the estate sale wouldn't know how to sell or price. If you see tools or art supplies, ask about if they have equipment. At one time I had 6 shimpo wheels that I got in practically dead condition for next to nothing, threw a new 2 hp motor in them, stripped the rust and repainted them and they ran better than originally manufactured. Most I ever spent on one was $100 from the person. Elbow grease and ingenuity will let you go farther than just a hunk of cash.

 

Usually is the correct word, as the wheels I got rid of were removed because of the amount of space they took up or the type of wheel they were. All three were well maintained kept clean, everything in working order. Many high school teachers are in the same boat, they get a piece of equipment they know they won't get another so they maintain it. Newer wheels came out years ago that took less space, were easier to learn on, and were actually easier to maintain, so many of us replaced the older larger ones.

 

That is exactly right, if I knew then what to do what I knew now ... school wheels would have been great but usually with the amount of time and materials it takes to refab them to something that can last a few years without issues ... just starting out there are better options. but if you need a lot of wheels to do some teaching on them and the wheel heads are good, sometimes it is a fantastic investment since you can get many of the same wheel brand for multiple people on a budget. I know if I get another wheel again for my home studio, i'm going to go for a kick wheel I can keep outside and tarped, or I'm going to go for another half dead shimpo since the lack of electric components that can fail are minimal and with a little care can last a decade or so without major issues.

 

But really, I know I just want a shimpo so I can repaint it metallic blue with silver ghost flames like a hotrod.

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Benzine    610

public school wheels are ussually trashed by the time you get to them. When I was actively buying equipment for my studio in college, I would go to estate sales. Normally, if there were things like kilns, wheels, extruders, etc ... it was something the people holding the estate sale wouldn't know how to sell or price. If you see tools or art supplies, ask about if they have equipment. At one time I had 6 shimpo wheels that I got in practically dead condition for next to nothing, threw a new 2 hp motor in them, stripped the rust and repainted them and they ran better than originally manufactured. Most I ever spent on one was $100 from the person. Elbow grease and ingenuity will let you go farther than just a hunk of cash.

 

 

Usually is the correct word, as the wheels I got rid of were removed because of the amount of space they took up or the type of wheel they were. All three were well maintained kept clean, everything in working order. Many high school teachers are in the same boat, they get a piece of equipment they know they won't get another so they maintain it. Newer wheels came out years ago that took less space, were easier to learn on, and were actually easier to maintain, so many of us replaced the older larger ones.

 

 

Yes indeed. I'm trying to get rid of a larger kick wheel, from my class myself. It takes up more space, than I can offer.....next on the list, is the odd treadle wheel....That thing is just odd.

 

 

Where are you located, Benzine? I am new, also looking for a wheel and I am in Gloucester MA. Doesn't hurt to ask

 

 

I'm in Iowa.

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