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#1 Tita

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Posted 13 February 2013 - 10:21 PM

Can any one tell me a good trimming tool brand , I have one of those cheaper ones that cost around 3.50 and its dull I even try to sharpen it but it didn't work
i will be very greatful for the info

#2 TJR

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Posted 14 February 2013 - 09:45 AM

You have to go to your ceramic supply store, not the art hobby store. The good ones are made of stainless steal. I can't think of any brand names off hand. Kemper, maybe.
You should be able to look on-line.I'm lucky in that I have a supplier where I just walk in, pick up clay and tools I need.
The ones made out of wire don't work well. Needs to be a band of steal.
TJR

#3 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 14 February 2013 - 09:52 AM

I like Dolan tools. The Potters Shop, (Steve Branfman's Bookstore in Mass) sells them.
They stay pretty sharp. I have worn one down with a lot of carving and it is still sharp , just thinner.

Marcia

#4 neilestrick

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Posted 14 February 2013 - 11:31 AM

IMO, the best tools are made of carbon steel, like Dolan or the Kemper Pro series. Wicked sharp, and stay sharp a long time. They are pricey compared to other brands, though, like 3 to 4 times as much. I'm not convinced that they last 3 to 4 times as long, but they do hold an edge much longer, and are easier to resharpen.
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#5 JBaymore

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Posted 14 February 2013 - 12:49 PM

I mostly use Japanese kanna trimming tools. VERY sharp.....and typically get sharpened (diamond stone) before every use. Because of their shape, they are easy to sharpen.

BUT,..... and this is a bit "but"...... most epople who are not used to them and use the usual more western loop type tools have a hard time adjusting for a while. They require a precise cutting (not scraping) angle,...and will dive right through a form in an instant if slightly misalligned.

For Western style... Dolan. And I 2nd the reccommendation for "The Potters Shop", in Needham, MA.

best,

...................john
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#6 Tita

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Posted 14 February 2013 - 02:05 PM

You have to go to your ceramic supply store, not the art hobby store. The good ones are made of stainless steal. I can't think of any brand names off hand. Kemper, maybe.
You should be able to look on-line.I'm lucky in that I have a supplier where I just walk in, pick up clay and tools I need.
The ones made out of wire don't work well. Needs to be a band of steal.
TJR


Thank you for the info

#7 Tita

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Posted 14 February 2013 - 02:09 PM

I like Dolan tools. The Potters Shop, (Steve Branfman's Bookstore in Mass) sells them.
They stay pretty sharp. I have worn one down with a lot of carving and it is still sharp , just thinner.

Marcia


Thank you I have heard of Dolan but I wasn't sure if they would last, so I appreciate the information

#8 Tita

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Posted 14 February 2013 - 02:11 PM

I mostly use Japanese kanna trimming tools. VERY sharp.....and typically get sharpened (diamond stone) before every use. Because of their shape, they are easy to sharpen.

BUT,..... and this is a bit "but"...... most epople who are not used to them and use the usual more western loop type tools have a hard time adjusting for a while. They require a precise cutting (not scraping) angle,...and will dive right through a form in an instant if slightly misalligned.

For Western style... Dolan. And I 2nd the reccommendation for "The Potters Shop", in Needham, MA.

best,

...................john


Yes, I have purchased a similar tool, different brand, I did have a hard time using it but thank you I will buy a diamond stone so I can sharpen

#9 Tita

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Posted 14 February 2013 - 02:11 PM

IMO, the best tools are made of carbon steel, like Dolan or the Kemper Pro series. Wicked sharp, and stay sharp a long time. They are pricey compared to other brands, though, like 3 to 4 times as much. I'm not convinced that they last 3 to 4 times as long, but they do hold an edge much longer, and are easier to resharpen.


thank you for the information I am greatful

#10 Pres

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Posted 14 February 2013 - 02:36 PM

I mostly use Japanese kanna trimming tools. VERY sharp.....and typically get sharpened (diamond stone) before every use. Because of their shape, they are easy to sharpen.

BUT,..... and this is a bit "but"...... most epople who are not used to them and use the usual more western loop type tools have a hard time adjusting for a while. They require a precise cutting (not scraping) angle,...and will dive right through a form in an instant if slightly misalligned.

For Western style... Dolan. And I 2nd the reccommendation for "The Potters Shop", in Needham, MA.

best,

...................john


I like the open style tools like the Japanese kanna trimming tools. I started out mostly using loop tools, then tried a trim jim years ago. From there, I purchased more of the open style tools over the years, some more springy, some quite stiff and solid like my Dolan's. They are all easier to sharpen. I have also made my own using good hack saw blades, heating, bending and annealing them, then regrinding the desired shape. I have even made some bamboo trimming tools out of old spoons that I use on cheese hard pottery.

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#11 justanassembler

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Posted 14 February 2013 - 04:12 PM

I have been using a Bison tool since last may when my partner gave me one for my birthday. It hasn't dulled in any noticeable way, and it trims like a dream. I do have to trim stiffer than I used to, but once i adjusted to that, Ive really loved using it. Its function aside, Phil is a true craftsman who puts care into his products down to the packaging.

#12 Iforgot

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Posted 14 February 2013 - 10:12 PM

DOLAN!
Derek VonDrehle

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#13 bigDave

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Posted 15 February 2013 - 11:47 PM

I have been using a Bison tool since


65$ worth....you think?

good to see someone doing this though, someone must be buying

http://www.bisonstud...com/prices.html

#14 justanassembler

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Posted 16 February 2013 - 12:44 AM


I have been using a Bison tool since


65$ worth....you think?

good to see someone doing this though, someone must be buying

http://www.bisonstud...com/prices.html


yep, I dont have to sharpen it, it works exactly as I want it to, its comfortable and aesthetically pleasing. Its hand made by someone who clearly cares for the art of potting--all of those things are what makes it worth sixty five dollars to me, in much the same way I will pay 65.00 (and more) for a cup or teabowl I really like... I pay it because I value the aesthetic experience and I appreciate the time, knowledge, and ability that went into making the object. Sure, a 5.00 walmart special, or 22.00 poorly made cup might have the same utilitarian function, but utility is not the only thing Im after.

#15 bciskepottery

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Posted 16 February 2013 - 08:44 AM



I have been using a Bison tool since


65$ worth....you think?

good to see someone doing this though, someone must be buying

http://www.bisonstud...com/prices.html


yep, I dont have to sharpen it, it works exactly as I want it to, its comfortable and aesthetically pleasing. Its hand made by someone who clearly cares for the art of potting--all of those things are what makes it worth sixty five dollars to me, in much the same way I will pay 65.00 (and more) for a cup or teabowl I really like... I pay it because I value the aesthetic experience and I appreciate the time, knowledge, and ability that went into making the object. Sure, a 5.00 walmart special, or 22.00 poorly made cup might have the same utilitarian function, but utility is not the only thing Im after.


And if you send your $4 cheapie back to Kemper, will they re-sharpen it for you for free? Phil will . . . for the lifetime of the trimming tool. Bison tools are a pleasure to hold and use . . . just like drinking out of a fine mug. We constantly bemoan mass produced, limited life mugs, bowls, plates and ceramic wares. We should have the same attitude for the tools we use.

#16 docweathers

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Posted 18 February 2013 - 12:36 AM

My favorite ones are made out of hacksaw blades. it's easy, cheap and you can make some really interesting tools.

Larry

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#17 Mark C.

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Posted 18 February 2013 - 02:41 AM

I have ben using a double ended small size 7 inch tool Phil of Bison tools made from pro to type. I have three of them.
I have been using them for many years now and have worn out two which he retips for me. I Trim a lot of porcelain and after 3-5 years the carbide is gone.
These tools cost a lot if you do not trim much but if you do they pay for themselves as they last a LONG time. With these tools they work better if the clay is a little bit dryer.They are not for everyone or the casual clay person in my view. As said already they are custom made by a person who you can talk to who stands behind his product and also for me they work the best and last the longest. They will break if dropped or wacked as carbide is not strong like metal.Care must be used with using and storing them.I posted a photo of some last year here.
Before bison I used a R2 Kemper which I bought by the gross as I wore them them fast. I did like dolan tools but am now just a bison guy. I have more than one so I can send one back for new tips and still use one every day as a production potter who trims almost daily for life.
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#18 yedrow

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Posted 22 February 2013 - 10:47 PM

I use some Japanese tools, but for anything the Dolan tool does, it does best so far as I've seen. When I need a large trimming surface the Japanese tools work better, but for loop style tools and other carving tips I'm all about the Dolan. Also, a good set of trimming tools makes a huge difference. Much like ribs, the type of foot and the options available are greatly enhanced by access to a variety of tools. However, in my opinion, it is best to master one tool at a time. I think the same way about ribs.

Joel.




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