Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Which Model Brent Wheel For School Use?


  • Please log in to reply
16 replies to this topic

#1 akplace21

akplace21

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts

Posted 11 January 2017 - 01:44 PM

I have been given the green light (after 15 yrs) to purchase potters wheels for my new art facility.  I teach high school grades 9-12 and will have 2-4 classes of ceramics a day all school year long.  I am partial to Brent wheels but open to suggestions otherwise.  What brands and models should I consider for my classroom?  I am looking for a quality piece of equipment that will suit my needs but not blow my budget.  I would buy the Brent CXC for my home studio but think that may be overkill for high school students.

Thank you in advance. 



#2 JBaymore

JBaymore

    Moderator

  • Moderators
  • 4,071 posts
  • LocationWilton, NH USA

Posted 11 January 2017 - 02:05 PM

I've had Model C-s stand up well at Massart and at NHIA where I've taught.  The CXC will stand up better though.

 

The reason for the CXC is not centering power,.... it is that the motor will be "cruising" in use.  less strain on it over time.  Also... that have better belts on the drive.

 

best,

 

...............john


John Baymore
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

Guest Professor, Wuxi Institute of Arts and Science, Yixing, China

Former President and Past President; Potters Council
 

http://www.JohnBaymore.com

http://www.nhia.edu/...ty/john-baymore


#3 MatthewV

MatthewV

    Alaskan

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 505 posts
  • LocationAlaska

Posted 11 January 2017 - 02:26 PM

Shimpo VL Whispers will also hold up well. They are also quiet. Most people seem to like using them more. They cost less than a Brent C. Whether or not they will last 20 years is an unanswered question; they only have a 5-year warranty.

I also have Brent wheel in my studio and all of my future wheels are expected to be Shimpo.


Make More Mistakes


#4 Mark C.

Mark C.

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 5,980 posts
  • LocationNear Arcata Ca-redwood rain forest

Posted 11 January 2017 - 04:52 PM

The CXC may last longer as John says but the C will also last a good long time if thats better for the budget .


Mark Cortright
www.liscomhillpottery.com

#5 neilestrick

neilestrick

    Neil Estrick

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4,677 posts
  • LocationGrayslake, IL

Posted 11 January 2017 - 04:59 PM

Thomas Stuart/Skutt wheels have a really large splash pan that will keep your studio cleaner, and industrial sized motors that will run cooler. Their 1/3hp model will be more than enough.


Neil Estrick
Kiln Repair Tech
L&L Kilns Distributor
Owner, Neil Estrick Gallery, LLC
www.neilestrickgallery.com

[email protected]


#6 Pres

Pres

    Retired Art Teacher

  • Moderators
  • 2,926 posts
  • LocationCentral, PA

Posted 11 January 2017 - 05:02 PM

I have purchased Baileys for budget concerns, back in the 90's. They are still running very well, and seem to have many more use in them. I have also had a CI and MP and HP, the HP is still ticking along very well, but the MP has been relegated to mostly trimming as everyone likes the larger motors on the Baileys and the HP. I spent many a day at Penn State with their model C wheels. They would take most of what I could do back then, and do it day in and day out with very little upkeep and much abuse that the under grads and grads put them through. My personal wheel is a CXC, as it will take everything and more this old guy can do on it. Never changed a belt yet, and it is over 20 years old.

 

 

best,

Pres


Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . . http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/

#7 Marcia Selsor

Marcia Selsor

    Professor Emerita, MSU-Billings

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 5,998 posts
  • LocationRed Lodge, Montana

Posted 11 January 2017 - 05:36 PM

I had Brent Model C s in my class room for many years. They had an occasional foot pedal problem but it was just needing adjustment.

Marcia
Marcia Selsor, Professor Emerita,Montana State University-Billings
[http://www.marciaselsorstudio.com

#8 neilestrick

neilestrick

    Neil Estrick

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4,677 posts
  • LocationGrayslake, IL

Posted 11 January 2017 - 06:02 PM

To be honest, pretty much any wheel will work just fine, and pretty much any wheel will last a good long time. There's just not a lot that goes wrong with wheels of any brand. I see all brands in schools, and the teachers never have any complaints except with the really old ones, which is true of just about any piece of machinery. Get what fits your budget.


Neil Estrick
Kiln Repair Tech
L&L Kilns Distributor
Owner, Neil Estrick Gallery, LLC
www.neilestrickgallery.com

[email protected]


#9 oldlady

oldlady

    single firing an electric kiln to cone 6

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,152 posts
  • Locationharpers ferry west va and pinellas park fl

Posted 11 January 2017 - 11:19 PM

may i suggest you find a place that has the kind of wheel you want to buy and get several of them running at the same time.  listen and see if you would be able to say very much over the noise.  it is true that most good wheels are very good but the noise some make can be a constant headache.  

 

some of the youtube videos allow you to hear a single wheel working and you are able to judge how much noise the wheel itself makes.


"putting you down does not raise me up."

#10 No Longer Member

No Longer Member

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 199 posts

Posted 11 January 2017 - 11:36 PM

To be honest, pretty much any wheel will work just fine, and pretty much any wheel will last a good long time. There's just not a lot that goes wrong with wheels of any brand. I see all brands in schools, and the teachers never have any complaints except with the really old ones, which is true of just about any piece of machinery. Get what fits your budget.

 

 

I agree with Neil, however; given the wheel mounted motor nature of the Whisper I'd go with something else for school or full time production use. I don't know the cost of that motor but I would imagine it's more than the usual suspects of "regular" DC motors.


Either I'm getting better looking with age....or my vision is getting worse... :lol:


#11 GEP

GEP

    Moderator / full time potter ^6 stoneware

  • Moderators
  • 1,311 posts
  • LocationSilver Spring, MD

Posted 12 January 2017 - 10:01 AM

The one brand I wouldn't recommend for a classroom is Pacifica. In the place where I used to teach, we had Brents and Pacificas. The problem with Pacificas is that the method for attaching the splashpan involved some instruction and was not intuitive. I frequently saw students trying to manhandle the splashpan into place. And therefore we experienced lots of cracked splashpans. In classes meant for newcomers, a wheel without a splashpan is unusable.

On the other hand, I never saw anyone have any trouble attaching the splashpan on a Brent.
Mea Rhee
Good Elephant Pottery
http://www.goodelephant.com

#12 elaine clapper

elaine clapper

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 49 posts
  • Locationrichland county ohio

Posted 12 January 2017 - 10:27 AM

I taught ceramics at the high school level for 20 plus years.   My first wheel at the high school in 1989 was an old brent kick wheel someone found at an auction. I then I bought two Brent CXC wheels.   I retired in 2012 but all three wheels are still there and going strong. 



#13 Mark C.

Mark C.

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 5,980 posts
  • LocationNear Arcata Ca-redwood rain forest

Posted 12 January 2017 - 12:51 PM

I would agree on passing on the Pacifica wheels for classrooms-I have seen a few not hold up well in heavy use.I think speedball wheels also fit in this category .


Mark Cortright
www.liscomhillpottery.com

#14 neilestrick

neilestrick

    Neil Estrick

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4,677 posts
  • LocationGrayslake, IL

Posted 12 January 2017 - 01:49 PM

A friend of mine runs a large program at a college, and Pacifica wheels are his favorites.


Neil Estrick
Kiln Repair Tech
L&L Kilns Distributor
Owner, Neil Estrick Gallery, LLC
www.neilestrickgallery.com

[email protected]


#15 Mark C.

Mark C.

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 5,980 posts
  • LocationNear Arcata Ca-redwood rain forest

Posted 12 January 2017 - 02:56 PM

A friend of mine runs a large program at a college, and Pacifica wheels are his favorites.

Well that goes to show there are always exceptions .


Mark Cortright
www.liscomhillpottery.com

#16 Pres

Pres

    Retired Art Teacher

  • Moderators
  • 2,926 posts
  • LocationCentral, PA

Posted 12 January 2017 - 07:33 PM

Get 30 potters, and 30 educators in a room, and you will probably get a wide variety of preferences when it comes to wheels. The purists would gasp at anything but a kick or treadle wheel. Others would call sacrilege at adding a motor to anything. The teachers would groan at the space taken up by a kick wheel as in the old Amaco or Brent. Then we would be left with the 50 or so that would get a belt or gear driven electric wheel. Of these arguments of foot pedal sensitivity would come into play, along with needed horsepower and torque. Others would argue for quieter wheels, or heavier wheels, or larger wheel heads, or even a switch for right or left handed throwing. Still others would cringe at the use of splash pans. Others would argue for sitting vs standing wheels or the option to do both. Then we would have everything categorized and the final choice would come down to brand.

 

Over the years every brand out there has had good and bad years, and knowing what you want is not necessarily what you need, so the best choice is often an educated stab in the dark. We all have our dream wheel, and often end up buying it after much thought and probably several years of wishing. Hopefully that wish come true does not disappoint. I believe that forums like this help to cement the decision and make it easier to discern whether it is something we need, or want.

 

 

best,

Pres


Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . . http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/

#17 No Longer Member

No Longer Member

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 199 posts

Posted 12 January 2017 - 09:34 PM

Get 30 potters, and 30 educators in a room, and you will probably get a wide variety of preferences when it comes to wheels.

Pres

 

 

Probably 120.... :D


Either I'm getting better looking with age....or my vision is getting worse... :lol:





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users