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GEP

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  1. Like
    GEP got a reaction from GiselleNo5 in Going Price Of Mugs   
    3 hours sounds like a normal amount of setup time to me. I do have a quicker setup for one-day shows, which involves a lightweight pop-up canopy (instead of the sturdier canopy), no walls, and less furniture. My one-day setup takes about 1.5 hours.
     
    Another potter once told me that his setup took 7 hours, with two people working on it. I couldn't imagine why they did not try to rethink it.
  2. Like
    GEP got a reaction from Stephen in Going Price Of Mugs   
    I'm not sure ... are you trying to say that you are skeptical that it can be done? I think there are people on this forum who have demonstrated they can handle this pace of making and selling. 
     
    As far as my own pace goes, I can produce $5000 of work in about 63 hours. That eight 6-hours days of making, and three 5-hour days of glazing. Give or take a few hours. I spread this out over 2.5 weeks so I get regular days off. I don't try to sell pots weekly, but rather about 10-12 shows per year. A show can occupy between 3 to 7 days of my time. In recent years I have been selling just about every pot I make. 
  3. Like
    GEP got a reaction from Callie Beller Diesel in Going Price Of Mugs   
    Agreed! 
     
    The amount of time you spend on each piece, and the years you spend developing skills ... these are things you can appreciate about yourself on a personal level. But don't ask your customers to pay for it. 
     
    Here's another way to put it ... if you are investing lots of time per pot, and you want to be paid for that time, the overall quality and appeal of the finished piece needs to fetch the price, not the time spent. 
  4. Like
    GEP got a reaction from Callie Beller Diesel in Going Price Of Mugs   
    Exactly, and handmakers need to accept this as our responsibility ... to choose venues where everyone involved (organizers, exhibitors, customers) are committed to handmade work. If you find yourself in a venue where your neighbor is selling mass-produced goods, that's not the neighbor's fault. They have the right to make a living however they see fit. It's the handmaker's fault for not doing a proper amount of research into the event. Been there done that! 
  5. Like
    GEP got a reaction from Rae Reich in Going Price Of Mugs   
    Here's something I've learned about underpricing: Underpricing only hurts the underpricer. It does not affect anyone else. So don't worry about what others are doing.
     
    I've found that underpricers might hurt you temporarily in a small event where everyone is underpricing except for you. You will stick out, and not in a good way, according to the audience who attends events like that. But still in the long run, it doesn't hurt you, because you have the power to choose not to return to that venue. And that is not the audience you need to win over.
     
    If I am in a large enough event, even if there are other potters who are underpricing, I've learned it does not affect me. As long as there are enough exhibitors with professional-level prices, I will do fine. Because this type of event will attract real pottery customers, the type of audience you want to win over. They do not shop based on price.
     
    On the flip side, if you are new to selling, don't feel pressured to charge more than you are comfortable with. The right answer is different for everyone. The first mugs I sold were $16, at events where "student-grade" work was accepted. I didn't ruin the handmade economy.
     
    The cautions about not underpricing are for experienced professionals, who are making expert-level work. And from my point of view, the caution is only about not forgoing any of your rightful income, and has nothing to do with hurting other potters or the handmade economy.
  6. Like
    GEP got a reaction from Pugaboo in Going Price Of Mugs   
    Here's something I've learned about underpricing: Underpricing only hurts the underpricer. It does not affect anyone else. So don't worry about what others are doing.
     
    I've found that underpricers might hurt you temporarily in a small event where everyone is underpricing except for you. You will stick out, and not in a good way, according to the audience who attends events like that. But still in the long run, it doesn't hurt you, because you have the power to choose not to return to that venue. And that is not the audience you need to win over.
     
    If I am in a large enough event, even if there are other potters who are underpricing, I've learned it does not affect me. As long as there are enough exhibitors with professional-level prices, I will do fine. Because this type of event will attract real pottery customers, the type of audience you want to win over. They do not shop based on price.
     
    On the flip side, if you are new to selling, don't feel pressured to charge more than you are comfortable with. The right answer is different for everyone. The first mugs I sold were $16, at events where "student-grade" work was accepted. I didn't ruin the handmade economy.
     
    The cautions about not underpricing are for experienced professionals, who are making expert-level work. And from my point of view, the caution is only about not forgoing any of your rightful income, and has nothing to do with hurting other potters or the handmade economy.
  7. Like
    GEP got a reaction from Joseph Fireborn in Going Price Of Mugs   
    Here's something I've learned about underpricing: Underpricing only hurts the underpricer. It does not affect anyone else. So don't worry about what others are doing.
     
    I've found that underpricers might hurt you temporarily in a small event where everyone is underpricing except for you. You will stick out, and not in a good way, according to the audience who attends events like that. But still in the long run, it doesn't hurt you, because you have the power to choose not to return to that venue. And that is not the audience you need to win over.
     
    If I am in a large enough event, even if there are other potters who are underpricing, I've learned it does not affect me. As long as there are enough exhibitors with professional-level prices, I will do fine. Because this type of event will attract real pottery customers, the type of audience you want to win over. They do not shop based on price.
     
    On the flip side, if you are new to selling, don't feel pressured to charge more than you are comfortable with. The right answer is different for everyone. The first mugs I sold were $16, at events where "student-grade" work was accepted. I didn't ruin the handmade economy.
     
    The cautions about not underpricing are for experienced professionals, who are making expert-level work. And from my point of view, the caution is only about not forgoing any of your rightful income, and has nothing to do with hurting other potters or the handmade economy.
  8. Like
    GEP got a reaction from TallTayl in Going Price Of Mugs   
    Here's something I've learned about underpricing: Underpricing only hurts the underpricer. It does not affect anyone else. So don't worry about what others are doing.
     
    I've found that underpricers might hurt you temporarily in a small event where everyone is underpricing except for you. You will stick out, and not in a good way, according to the audience who attends events like that. But still in the long run, it doesn't hurt you, because you have the power to choose not to return to that venue. And that is not the audience you need to win over.
     
    If I am in a large enough event, even if there are other potters who are underpricing, I've learned it does not affect me. As long as there are enough exhibitors with professional-level prices, I will do fine. Because this type of event will attract real pottery customers, the type of audience you want to win over. They do not shop based on price.
     
    On the flip side, if you are new to selling, don't feel pressured to charge more than you are comfortable with. The right answer is different for everyone. The first mugs I sold were $16, at events where "student-grade" work was accepted. I didn't ruin the handmade economy.
     
    The cautions about not underpricing are for experienced professionals, who are making expert-level work. And from my point of view, the caution is only about not forgoing any of your rightful income, and has nothing to do with hurting other potters or the handmade economy.
  9. Like
    GEP got a reaction from Chris Campbell in Going Price Of Mugs   
    Here's something I've learned about underpricing: Underpricing only hurts the underpricer. It does not affect anyone else. So don't worry about what others are doing.
     
    I've found that underpricers might hurt you temporarily in a small event where everyone is underpricing except for you. You will stick out, and not in a good way, according to the audience who attends events like that. But still in the long run, it doesn't hurt you, because you have the power to choose not to return to that venue. And that is not the audience you need to win over.
     
    If I am in a large enough event, even if there are other potters who are underpricing, I've learned it does not affect me. As long as there are enough exhibitors with professional-level prices, I will do fine. Because this type of event will attract real pottery customers, the type of audience you want to win over. They do not shop based on price.
     
    On the flip side, if you are new to selling, don't feel pressured to charge more than you are comfortable with. The right answer is different for everyone. The first mugs I sold were $16, at events where "student-grade" work was accepted. I didn't ruin the handmade economy.
     
    The cautions about not underpricing are for experienced professionals, who are making expert-level work. And from my point of view, the caution is only about not forgoing any of your rightful income, and has nothing to do with hurting other potters or the handmade economy.
  10. Like
    GEP got a reaction from bciskepottery in Going Price Of Mugs   
    Here's something I've learned about underpricing: Underpricing only hurts the underpricer. It does not affect anyone else. So don't worry about what others are doing.
     
    I've found that underpricers might hurt you temporarily in a small event where everyone is underpricing except for you. You will stick out, and not in a good way, according to the audience who attends events like that. But still in the long run, it doesn't hurt you, because you have the power to choose not to return to that venue. And that is not the audience you need to win over.
     
    If I am in a large enough event, even if there are other potters who are underpricing, I've learned it does not affect me. As long as there are enough exhibitors with professional-level prices, I will do fine. Because this type of event will attract real pottery customers, the type of audience you want to win over. They do not shop based on price.
     
    On the flip side, if you are new to selling, don't feel pressured to charge more than you are comfortable with. The right answer is different for everyone. The first mugs I sold were $16, at events where "student-grade" work was accepted. I didn't ruin the handmade economy.
     
    The cautions about not underpricing are for experienced professionals, who are making expert-level work. And from my point of view, the caution is only about not forgoing any of your rightful income, and has nothing to do with hurting other potters or the handmade economy.
  11. Like
    GEP got a reaction from TwinRocks in Going Price Of Mugs   
    Here's something I've learned about underpricing: Underpricing only hurts the underpricer. It does not affect anyone else. So don't worry about what others are doing.
     
    I've found that underpricers might hurt you temporarily in a small event where everyone is underpricing except for you. You will stick out, and not in a good way, according to the audience who attends events like that. But still in the long run, it doesn't hurt you, because you have the power to choose not to return to that venue. And that is not the audience you need to win over.
     
    If I am in a large enough event, even if there are other potters who are underpricing, I've learned it does not affect me. As long as there are enough exhibitors with professional-level prices, I will do fine. Because this type of event will attract real pottery customers, the type of audience you want to win over. They do not shop based on price.
     
    On the flip side, if you are new to selling, don't feel pressured to charge more than you are comfortable with. The right answer is different for everyone. The first mugs I sold were $16, at events where "student-grade" work was accepted. I didn't ruin the handmade economy.
     
    The cautions about not underpricing are for experienced professionals, who are making expert-level work. And from my point of view, the caution is only about not forgoing any of your rightful income, and has nothing to do with hurting other potters or the handmade economy.
  12. Like
    GEP got a reaction from GiselleNo5 in Going Price Of Mugs   
    It's been a few years since I've done a wholesale trade show. But I recall that the going price for a medium size, professional-quality mug was $12. Which translates to $25 retail. Many potters were willing and able to sell at that price. The key is to be able to produce them very efficiently. So for some potters that price point works, and it leads to a high volume of sales.
     
    I wholesale large mugs for $17 ($35 retail, though some of my galleries sell them for more). At the tradeshows I could still find buyers, but not as many. Some buyers would bluntly say "I love your mugs but I know I can't get that price."
     
    These days I do not attend trade shows anymore, and only solicit orders from my existing accounts. Of the accounts I have left, most of them are in northeast metropolitan locations, where $35-$40 for a handmade mug, of any size, is normal.
  13. Like
    GEP got a reaction from Babs in Going Price Of Mugs   
    Exactly, and handmakers need to accept this as our responsibility ... to choose venues where everyone involved (organizers, exhibitors, customers) are committed to handmade work. If you find yourself in a venue where your neighbor is selling mass-produced goods, that's not the neighbor's fault. They have the right to make a living however they see fit. It's the handmaker's fault for not doing a proper amount of research into the event. Been there done that! 
  14. Like
    GEP got a reaction from bciskepottery in Going Price Of Mugs   
    Exactly, and handmakers need to accept this as our responsibility ... to choose venues where everyone involved (organizers, exhibitors, customers) are committed to handmade work. If you find yourself in a venue where your neighbor is selling mass-produced goods, that's not the neighbor's fault. They have the right to make a living however they see fit. It's the handmaker's fault for not doing a proper amount of research into the event. Been there done that! 
  15. Like
    GEP got a reaction from Min in Going Price Of Mugs   
    Exactly, and handmakers need to accept this as our responsibility ... to choose venues where everyone involved (organizers, exhibitors, customers) are committed to handmade work. If you find yourself in a venue where your neighbor is selling mass-produced goods, that's not the neighbor's fault. They have the right to make a living however they see fit. It's the handmaker's fault for not doing a proper amount of research into the event. Been there done that! 
  16. Like
    GEP got a reaction from Babs in Going Price Of Mugs   
    $35


  17. Like
    GEP got a reaction from TwinRocks in Going Price Of Mugs   
    $35


  18. Like
    GEP got a reaction from Crusty in Leaving Functional Ware Unglazed   
    I agree that it's not a safety issue, if you know your claybody and are firing it properly. I also agree with those who say it's harder to clean, and will also add that unglazed or matte-glazed surfaces make an unpleasant scraping noise when using metal silverware. The noise is why I line my foodware with a glossy glaze.
  19. Like
    GEP got a reaction from Babs in Leaving Functional Ware Unglazed   
    I agree that it's not a safety issue, if you know your claybody and are firing it properly. I also agree with those who say it's harder to clean, and will also add that unglazed or matte-glazed surfaces make an unpleasant scraping noise when using metal silverware. The noise is why I line my foodware with a glossy glaze.
  20. Like
    GEP reacted to jolieo in Submit Your Community Challenge Ideas   
    I like the idea of motion
    Weather extremes
    Multi functional vessels
    My point being that I as a newbie could earn points for execution on the concept, and still be in the running, whilst those with lots of wisdom and experience could push the limits with technical and conceptual meshings.
  21. Like
    GEP reacted to Biglou13 in Submit Your Community Challenge Ideas   
    CUP !
  22. Like
    GEP got a reaction from Babs in Pregnancy And Working In The Studio?   
    I've had a few pregnant pottery students, they all kept at it until a few weeks before giving birth. Some of them switched to a stand-up wheel when their bellies got too big to sit down and lean over. Some of them were avid wood-firers, so I recommended they avoid the shift that included salt glazing, and their classmates were happy to help them avoid too much heavy lifting, but otherwise they fully participated. The harder part is after the baby is born, when the new mom has a lot less free time and energy.
  23. Like
    GEP got a reaction from Callie Beller Diesel in Pregnancy And Working In The Studio?   
    I've had a few pregnant pottery students, they all kept at it until a few weeks before giving birth. Some of them switched to a stand-up wheel when their bellies got too big to sit down and lean over. Some of them were avid wood-firers, so I recommended they avoid the shift that included salt glazing, and their classmates were happy to help them avoid too much heavy lifting, but otherwise they fully participated. The harder part is after the baby is born, when the new mom has a lot less free time and energy.
  24. Like
    GEP reacted to Pres in Trimming Issues   
    I have included a couple of pics of the chuck on the wheel. I did not have any stems to trim of late so you can't see that yet. However, for those of you that use the GG I think it explains itself. I find that it works better for me using the base pads to hold it in place rather than longer stems and pillows. The parts are simple, flange, Pipe head donut, and a soft rubber seal. The pipe I saw using a cutoff to keep it square resting on the GG top with the flange around it. There is not glue, so you could take it apart and put different lengths of pipe in. This is all 3" pipe. I hope you can understand how it is used, and it probably would work for bottles, candle holders, and other long stemmed objects. As I throw off the hump and don't always get an even cut, this allows me to even up the base with a hack saw blade held perpendicular to the base of the stem pressing evenly across, in a matter of seconds it will even out the base.




  25. Like
    GEP got a reaction from Marcia Selsor in Trimming Issues   
    You can leave the bottles centered on your bat, then trim the sides of the bottle while it is still right-side-up. Then you only need to trim the very bottom of the pot upside-down. This is how I approach tall cylinders and small-neck pots. The triangular metal trimmer that claylover mentions is very useful for this.
     
    Giffin grip is a great tool. It is not a substitute for clay skills. For me it only saves me the time of putting down clay wads to hold down my pots for trimming. It's method of holding small-neck pots upside-down is very effective, but nothing more than a chuck that can be adjusted for size.
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