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GEP

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  1. Like
    GEP got a reaction from LeeU in What's On Your Kitchen Table?   
    I found enough ingredients in my kitchen to make a Shoo Fly Pie. This is one of my favorite pies, so simple and down to earth, easy to make. I’m down to my last slice. Plate by Christy Knox. Photograph by Laura DeNardo.

    1 9-inch pie crust
    1 cup molasses
    3/4 cup hot water
    3/4 tsp baking soda
    1 egg beaten
    3/4 cup all-purpose flour
    1/2 cup brown sugar
    3 tbsp butter or shortening
     
    Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.
    Combine molasses, hot water, and baking soda. Stir well. Whisk in beaten egg. Pour mixture into pie shell.
    In a medium bowl, combine flour and brown sugar. Cut in butter/shortening until mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Sprinkle on top of molasses layer.
    Bake in preheated oven for 15 minutes. Lower temp to 350 degrees and bake an additional 30-40 minutes. 
  2. Like
    GEP got a reaction from Rae Reich in Slab roller   
    Offset lithographic printers are still very much around. The place you're talking about is probably a digital-only shop. If it has a retail storefront that the public can enter, then it's not the right kind of place. 
    For anyone who is trying to find printer blankets, try googling "offset lithographic printer near me." Then give them a call and tell the receptionist that you are a potter who is wondering if their company gives away used printer blankets. They should be free, printers throw them away everyday. But be prepared to pay a reasonable price if asked, for the time it takes them to accommodate your request. 
  3. Like
    GEP got a reaction from Callie Beller Diesel in What's On Your Kitchen Table?   
    I found enough ingredients in my kitchen to make a Shoo Fly Pie. This is one of my favorite pies, so simple and down to earth, easy to make. I’m down to my last slice. Plate by Christy Knox. Photograph by Laura DeNardo.

    1 9-inch pie crust
    1 cup molasses
    3/4 cup hot water
    3/4 tsp baking soda
    1 egg beaten
    3/4 cup all-purpose flour
    1/2 cup brown sugar
    3 tbsp butter or shortening
     
    Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.
    Combine molasses, hot water, and baking soda. Stir well. Whisk in beaten egg. Pour mixture into pie shell.
    In a medium bowl, combine flour and brown sugar. Cut in butter/shortening until mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Sprinkle on top of molasses layer.
    Bake in preheated oven for 15 minutes. Lower temp to 350 degrees and bake an additional 30-40 minutes. 
  4. Like
    GEP got a reaction from Rae Reich in What's On Your Kitchen Table?   
    I found enough ingredients in my kitchen to make a Shoo Fly Pie. This is one of my favorite pies, so simple and down to earth, easy to make. I’m down to my last slice. Plate by Christy Knox. Photograph by Laura DeNardo.

    1 9-inch pie crust
    1 cup molasses
    3/4 cup hot water
    3/4 tsp baking soda
    1 egg beaten
    3/4 cup all-purpose flour
    1/2 cup brown sugar
    3 tbsp butter or shortening
     
    Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.
    Combine molasses, hot water, and baking soda. Stir well. Whisk in beaten egg. Pour mixture into pie shell.
    In a medium bowl, combine flour and brown sugar. Cut in butter/shortening until mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Sprinkle on top of molasses layer.
    Bake in preheated oven for 15 minutes. Lower temp to 350 degrees and bake an additional 30-40 minutes. 
  5. Like
    GEP got a reaction from Jennifer Harnetty in What's On Your Kitchen Table?   
    I found enough ingredients in my kitchen to make a Shoo Fly Pie. This is one of my favorite pies, so simple and down to earth, easy to make. I’m down to my last slice. Plate by Christy Knox. Photograph by Laura DeNardo.

    1 9-inch pie crust
    1 cup molasses
    3/4 cup hot water
    3/4 tsp baking soda
    1 egg beaten
    3/4 cup all-purpose flour
    1/2 cup brown sugar
    3 tbsp butter or shortening
     
    Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.
    Combine molasses, hot water, and baking soda. Stir well. Whisk in beaten egg. Pour mixture into pie shell.
    In a medium bowl, combine flour and brown sugar. Cut in butter/shortening until mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Sprinkle on top of molasses layer.
    Bake in preheated oven for 15 minutes. Lower temp to 350 degrees and bake an additional 30-40 minutes. 
  6. Like
    GEP got a reaction from Hulk in What's On Your Kitchen Table?   
    I found enough ingredients in my kitchen to make a Shoo Fly Pie. This is one of my favorite pies, so simple and down to earth, easy to make. I’m down to my last slice. Plate by Christy Knox. Photograph by Laura DeNardo.

    1 9-inch pie crust
    1 cup molasses
    3/4 cup hot water
    3/4 tsp baking soda
    1 egg beaten
    3/4 cup all-purpose flour
    1/2 cup brown sugar
    3 tbsp butter or shortening
     
    Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.
    Combine molasses, hot water, and baking soda. Stir well. Whisk in beaten egg. Pour mixture into pie shell.
    In a medium bowl, combine flour and brown sugar. Cut in butter/shortening until mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Sprinkle on top of molasses layer.
    Bake in preheated oven for 15 minutes. Lower temp to 350 degrees and bake an additional 30-40 minutes. 
  7. Like
    GEP got a reaction from neilestrick in What's On Your Kitchen Table?   
    I found enough ingredients in my kitchen to make a Shoo Fly Pie. This is one of my favorite pies, so simple and down to earth, easy to make. I’m down to my last slice. Plate by Christy Knox. Photograph by Laura DeNardo.

    1 9-inch pie crust
    1 cup molasses
    3/4 cup hot water
    3/4 tsp baking soda
    1 egg beaten
    3/4 cup all-purpose flour
    1/2 cup brown sugar
    3 tbsp butter or shortening
     
    Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.
    Combine molasses, hot water, and baking soda. Stir well. Whisk in beaten egg. Pour mixture into pie shell.
    In a medium bowl, combine flour and brown sugar. Cut in butter/shortening until mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Sprinkle on top of molasses layer.
    Bake in preheated oven for 15 minutes. Lower temp to 350 degrees and bake an additional 30-40 minutes. 
  8. Like
    GEP got a reaction from Min in What's On Your Kitchen Table?   
    I found enough ingredients in my kitchen to make a Shoo Fly Pie. This is one of my favorite pies, so simple and down to earth, easy to make. I’m down to my last slice. Plate by Christy Knox. Photograph by Laura DeNardo.

    1 9-inch pie crust
    1 cup molasses
    3/4 cup hot water
    3/4 tsp baking soda
    1 egg beaten
    3/4 cup all-purpose flour
    1/2 cup brown sugar
    3 tbsp butter or shortening
     
    Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.
    Combine molasses, hot water, and baking soda. Stir well. Whisk in beaten egg. Pour mixture into pie shell.
    In a medium bowl, combine flour and brown sugar. Cut in butter/shortening until mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Sprinkle on top of molasses layer.
    Bake in preheated oven for 15 minutes. Lower temp to 350 degrees and bake an additional 30-40 minutes. 
  9. Like
    GEP got a reaction from Rae Reich in The power of email   
    I've posted about this subject before, just want to share another quick story about how much more powerful email marketing is, compared to social media.
    The past two years, I have participated in an online show/sale of cups. Last year, I sent a blast email to my email subscribers about it, and I posted about it on facebook and instagram. My five mugs sold out in under 10 minutes.
    This year, I decided to skip the blast email, and just use social media. I was theorizing that my email subscribers prefer to go to my shows in person, and social media followers are more likely to not be local enough to do that. I only sold three mugs on the first day. Two days later, and person on instagram asked me for instructions on how to buy. Instagram does not allow hyperlinks, so I had to describe how to get to right website. Cumbersome, but it appeared to work, the fourth mug was sold that day.
    Two days later (yesterday), the fifth mug was still not sold. I posted on facebook about the last mug. I did not bother with instagram, because I could not link directly to the mug listing on instagram. Nothing happened. 
    Three days later (today), it was still not sold. I had scheduled a blast email about a show coming up this weekend. So I edited the email this morning to mention the last unsold mug. It was sold 30 minutes after the email went out.
    Just remember your email subscribers are far more interested in your work than anyone who follows you on social media. Next year, if I do this cup show again, I will not skip the blast email!
  10. Like
    GEP got a reaction from Rae Reich in corona virus may effect sales   
    Welp, just like @neilestrick was referring to above, my April show was postponed to a weekend in October when I have already committed to another show. I have already paid both booth fees. Both shows have a no-refund policy. But one has an “act of god” clause and the other has a “catastrophic event” clause. Not sure if the current situation qualifies for either. Now I have to choose. The biggest factor will be if either show will refund my booth fee, and what percentage. It’s a paradox, because the show that acts more generously is the one I’d rather do. I’ll be doing a lot of begging and pleading in the next few days. 
  11. Like
    GEP got a reaction from Rae Reich in corona virus may effect sales   
    Another point about art festivals ... although the format is inherently unpredictable, that also means it's flexible. If my spring shows are cancelled and I end up with extra stock, I can sign up for an extra show or two in the fall, or even next year. The income is delayed, not lost. Unlike other industries, where the money they are losing now is gone for good. 
  12. Like
    GEP got a reaction from Rae Reich in corona virus may effect sales   
    Ok, if the advice was meant for everybody, why did you tag it with my username?
    ps, if the advice is for everybody, I still disagree with it. Working potters should avoid debt like, well, like a contagious virus. And we certainly shouldn’t borrow a whole year’s worth of living expenses. It’s possible to plan ahead for being out of work for a year. And if you’re not prepared for that, an extended work outage means you need to get another job, not a loan. 
  13. Like
    GEP got a reaction from Rae Reich in corona virus may effect sales   
    Liam, this is not how I operate. I hate borrowing money and hate paying interest, no matter how low. My comment says that I always keep enough cash flow on hand to survive missed shows. Shows are 95% of my income, but like I was trying to say, I know it’s a risky business and therefore I stay prepared. I’m not going to brag about my specific finances on the internet. I’ll just say that, like Mark, I am already set up to retire. 
    Edit to add: This is part of a broader concept for anyone who wants to be self-employed. When I quit my last full-time job to become self-employed in the 90s, I promised myself that I would always buy myself health insurance and start a retirement plan. Then when I quit design to become a full-time potter,  I knew the income would be less predictable and therefore I promised myself to manage my cashflow accordingly. With freedom comes responsibility. 
  14. Like
    GEP got a reaction from Rae Reich in corona virus may effect sales   
    My next shows are mid-April and mid-May. No word yet if they will be cancelled. My hopes are low for the April show. I normally choose the non-refundable hotel option because it’s cheaper. This time I only booked cancellable hotels, just in case.
    I’m still producing as usual. If the shows are cancelled, I’ll have extra pots for summer shows, and I’ll take some time off. The loss of income isn’t fun, but this is a good example of why small business owners need to be proactive about cash flow. I’ll be fine. Even when there’s no pandemic, any show can be wiped out by bad weather. 
  15. Like
    GEP got a reaction from Stephen in QotW: What are your concerns about the coronovirus impact on your health and your livelihood and passion?   
    My first concern is my health and safety, and the health and safety of my parents (ages 78 and 85) who live in a retirement community, and I can’t visit them right now. (I am technically still allowed to visit, but I’d rather be cautious.) Then there are my siblings, who live is zones where the outbreak is much worse than here, 
    Staying home is not that different than my normal lifestyle, since my workplace is in the basement. I got a load of clay maybe two weeks ago, so I plan to keep making pots. 
    The Washington Post is behind a soft paywall, you can read up to 5 (I think) articles for free per month. Here’s a great little demonstration of why social distancing is important right now. Stay in one place! Avoid other people!
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2020/world/corona-simulator/
  16. Like
    GEP got a reaction from Pres in corona virus may effect sales   
    Welp, just like @neilestrick was referring to above, my April show was postponed to a weekend in October when I have already committed to another show. I have already paid both booth fees. Both shows have a no-refund policy. But one has an “act of god” clause and the other has a “catastrophic event” clause. Not sure if the current situation qualifies for either. Now I have to choose. The biggest factor will be if either show will refund my booth fee, and what percentage. It’s a paradox, because the show that acts more generously is the one I’d rather do. I’ll be doing a lot of begging and pleading in the next few days. 
  17. Like
    GEP got a reaction from Pres in corona virus may effect sales   
    Liam, this is not how I operate. I hate borrowing money and hate paying interest, no matter how low. My comment says that I always keep enough cash flow on hand to survive missed shows. Shows are 95% of my income, but like I was trying to say, I know it’s a risky business and therefore I stay prepared. I’m not going to brag about my specific finances on the internet. I’ll just say that, like Mark, I am already set up to retire. 
    Edit to add: This is part of a broader concept for anyone who wants to be self-employed. When I quit my last full-time job to become self-employed in the 90s, I promised myself that I would always buy myself health insurance and start a retirement plan. Then when I quit design to become a full-time potter,  I knew the income would be less predictable and therefore I promised myself to manage my cashflow accordingly. With freedom comes responsibility. 
  18. Like
    GEP got a reaction from Pres in QotW: What are your concerns about the coronovirus impact on your health and your livelihood and passion?   
    My first concern is my health and safety, and the health and safety of my parents (ages 78 and 85) who live in a retirement community, and I can’t visit them right now. (I am technically still allowed to visit, but I’d rather be cautious.) Then there are my siblings, who live is zones where the outbreak is much worse than here, 
    Staying home is not that different than my normal lifestyle, since my workplace is in the basement. I got a load of clay maybe two weeks ago, so I plan to keep making pots. 
    The Washington Post is behind a soft paywall, you can read up to 5 (I think) articles for free per month. Here’s a great little demonstration of why social distancing is important right now. Stay in one place! Avoid other people!
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2020/world/corona-simulator/
  19. Like
    GEP got a reaction from Yasmin in What’s on your workbench?   
    Elephants!

  20. Like
    GEP reacted to Min in corona virus may effect sales   
    And dishes for babies 9 months from now.
  21. Like
    GEP reacted to neilestrick in corona virus may effect sales   
    Shows must realize that if they reschedule there are going to be problems with artists being double booked. How well they handle it (or don't) could have a huge effect on how willing artists are to work with them in the future. This situation will expose their true colors. I choose to do a couple of shows every year not because they are the most profitable, but because they are a pleasure to do.
  22. Like
    GEP got a reaction from neilestrick in corona virus may effect sales   
    Welp, just like @neilestrick was referring to above, my April show was postponed to a weekend in October when I have already committed to another show. I have already paid both booth fees. Both shows have a no-refund policy. But one has an “act of god” clause and the other has a “catastrophic event” clause. Not sure if the current situation qualifies for either. Now I have to choose. The biggest factor will be if either show will refund my booth fee, and what percentage. It’s a paradox, because the show that acts more generously is the one I’d rather do. I’ll be doing a lot of begging and pleading in the next few days. 
  23. Like
    GEP got a reaction from Callie Beller Diesel in corona virus may effect sales   
    Another point about art festivals ... although the format is inherently unpredictable, that also means it's flexible. If my spring shows are cancelled and I end up with extra stock, I can sign up for an extra show or two in the fall, or even next year. The income is delayed, not lost. Unlike other industries, where the money they are losing now is gone for good. 
  24. Like
    GEP got a reaction from neilestrick in corona virus may effect sales   
    Another point about art festivals ... although the format is inherently unpredictable, that also means it's flexible. If my spring shows are cancelled and I end up with extra stock, I can sign up for an extra show or two in the fall, or even next year. The income is delayed, not lost. Unlike other industries, where the money they are losing now is gone for good. 
  25. Like
    GEP got a reaction from Roberta12 in corona virus may effect sales   
    Another point about art festivals ... although the format is inherently unpredictable, that also means it's flexible. If my spring shows are cancelled and I end up with extra stock, I can sign up for an extra show or two in the fall, or even next year. The income is delayed, not lost. Unlike other industries, where the money they are losing now is gone for good. 
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