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GEP

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  1. Like
    GEP got a reaction from Chilly in The power of email   
    I've posted about this subject before, just want to share another quick story about how much more powerful email marketing is, compared to social media.
    The past two years, I have participated in an online show/sale of cups. Last year, I sent a blast email to my email subscribers about it, and I posted about it on facebook and instagram. My five mugs sold out in under 10 minutes.
    This year, I decided to skip the blast email, and just use social media. I was theorizing that my email subscribers prefer to go to my shows in person, and social media followers are more likely to not be local enough to do that. I only sold three mugs on the first day. Two days later, and person on instagram asked me for instructions on how to buy. Instagram does not allow hyperlinks, so I had to describe how to get to right website. Cumbersome, but it appeared to work, the fourth mug was sold that day.
    Two days later (yesterday), the fifth mug was still not sold. I posted on facebook about the last mug. I did not bother with instagram, because I could not link directly to the mug listing on instagram. Nothing happened. 
    Three days later (today), it was still not sold. I had scheduled a blast email about a show coming up this weekend. So I edited the email this morning to mention the last unsold mug. It was sold 30 minutes after the email went out.
    Just remember your email subscribers are far more interested in your work than anyone who follows you on social media. Next year, if I do this cup show again, I will not skip the blast email!
  2. Like
    GEP got a reaction from LeeU in The power of email   
    I've posted about this subject before, just want to share another quick story about how much more powerful email marketing is, compared to social media.
    The past two years, I have participated in an online show/sale of cups. Last year, I sent a blast email to my email subscribers about it, and I posted about it on facebook and instagram. My five mugs sold out in under 10 minutes.
    This year, I decided to skip the blast email, and just use social media. I was theorizing that my email subscribers prefer to go to my shows in person, and social media followers are more likely to not be local enough to do that. I only sold three mugs on the first day. Two days later, and person on instagram asked me for instructions on how to buy. Instagram does not allow hyperlinks, so I had to describe how to get to right website. Cumbersome, but it appeared to work, the fourth mug was sold that day.
    Two days later (yesterday), the fifth mug was still not sold. I posted on facebook about the last mug. I did not bother with instagram, because I could not link directly to the mug listing on instagram. Nothing happened. 
    Three days later (today), it was still not sold. I had scheduled a blast email about a show coming up this weekend. So I edited the email this morning to mention the last unsold mug. It was sold 30 minutes after the email went out.
    Just remember your email subscribers are far more interested in your work than anyone who follows you on social media. Next year, if I do this cup show again, I will not skip the blast email!
  3. Like
    GEP got a reaction from liambesaw in The power of email   
    I've posted about this subject before, just want to share another quick story about how much more powerful email marketing is, compared to social media.
    The past two years, I have participated in an online show/sale of cups. Last year, I sent a blast email to my email subscribers about it, and I posted about it on facebook and instagram. My five mugs sold out in under 10 minutes.
    This year, I decided to skip the blast email, and just use social media. I was theorizing that my email subscribers prefer to go to my shows in person, and social media followers are more likely to not be local enough to do that. I only sold three mugs on the first day. Two days later, and person on instagram asked me for instructions on how to buy. Instagram does not allow hyperlinks, so I had to describe how to get to right website. Cumbersome, but it appeared to work, the fourth mug was sold that day.
    Two days later (yesterday), the fifth mug was still not sold. I posted on facebook about the last mug. I did not bother with instagram, because I could not link directly to the mug listing on instagram. Nothing happened. 
    Three days later (today), it was still not sold. I had scheduled a blast email about a show coming up this weekend. So I edited the email this morning to mention the last unsold mug. It was sold 30 minutes after the email went out.
    Just remember your email subscribers are far more interested in your work than anyone who follows you on social media. Next year, if I do this cup show again, I will not skip the blast email!
  4. Like
    GEP got a reaction from Roberta12 in The power of email   
    I've posted about this subject before, just want to share another quick story about how much more powerful email marketing is, compared to social media.
    The past two years, I have participated in an online show/sale of cups. Last year, I sent a blast email to my email subscribers about it, and I posted about it on facebook and instagram. My five mugs sold out in under 10 minutes.
    This year, I decided to skip the blast email, and just use social media. I was theorizing that my email subscribers prefer to go to my shows in person, and social media followers are more likely to not be local enough to do that. I only sold three mugs on the first day. Two days later, and person on instagram asked me for instructions on how to buy. Instagram does not allow hyperlinks, so I had to describe how to get to right website. Cumbersome, but it appeared to work, the fourth mug was sold that day.
    Two days later (yesterday), the fifth mug was still not sold. I posted on facebook about the last mug. I did not bother with instagram, because I could not link directly to the mug listing on instagram. Nothing happened. 
    Three days later (today), it was still not sold. I had scheduled a blast email about a show coming up this weekend. So I edited the email this morning to mention the last unsold mug. It was sold 30 minutes after the email went out.
    Just remember your email subscribers are far more interested in your work than anyone who follows you on social media. Next year, if I do this cup show again, I will not skip the blast email!
  5. Like
    GEP got a reaction from Callie Beller Diesel in The power of email   
    I've posted about this subject before, just want to share another quick story about how much more powerful email marketing is, compared to social media.
    The past two years, I have participated in an online show/sale of cups. Last year, I sent a blast email to my email subscribers about it, and I posted about it on facebook and instagram. My five mugs sold out in under 10 minutes.
    This year, I decided to skip the blast email, and just use social media. I was theorizing that my email subscribers prefer to go to my shows in person, and social media followers are more likely to not be local enough to do that. I only sold three mugs on the first day. Two days later, and person on instagram asked me for instructions on how to buy. Instagram does not allow hyperlinks, so I had to describe how to get to right website. Cumbersome, but it appeared to work, the fourth mug was sold that day.
    Two days later (yesterday), the fifth mug was still not sold. I posted on facebook about the last mug. I did not bother with instagram, because I could not link directly to the mug listing on instagram. Nothing happened. 
    Three days later (today), it was still not sold. I had scheduled a blast email about a show coming up this weekend. So I edited the email this morning to mention the last unsold mug. It was sold 30 minutes after the email went out.
    Just remember your email subscribers are far more interested in your work than anyone who follows you on social media. Next year, if I do this cup show again, I will not skip the blast email!
  6. Like
    GEP reacted to Hulk in Teapots cracking just above foot when filled with boiling water.   
    Hi Morris!
    ditto on pics, and approximate the thickness on both sides o'th' footring - if you trim rings, else both sides of the cracks - my guess would be the bottom is much thicker than the base of the wall? 
  7. Like
    GEP reacted to Hulk in Recycling Clay   
    Hi Travis!
    Any failing/failed bits that are dryer than what I like to throw with go into scrap bin to fully dry and await recycle.
    Failed blobs/lumps that are wetter than what I like to throw with may end up in the same bin, else dropped on a plaster bat - especially if sticky - or just left on the wedging board if not sticky.
    Plaster absorbs water quickly! I'll knead that clay periodically, until ready for wedging, then re-throw when it feels about right. If I'm not around to monitor, I'll cover the clay, or just throw it in the recycle bin to dry out completely. A very wet blob could hang around for quite a while before getting too dry...
    A rib or wood knife is handy for scraping sticky clay off one's hands and fingers.
    Drying up smaller bits of wet clay (smaller than a bag - twenty five pounds) for reuse - about the same as the end of the recycle process. Crucial, imo, is thorough wedge, such that result is homogeneous, that is, no dryer or wetter threads of clay hiding in thar to wreck the next piece! If the blob gets a bit too dry, cutting into bread sized slices, misting, re-wedge, repeat... it's a bit of effort, but it does work. Still key is thorough wedge.
  8. Like
    GEP reacted to liambesaw in What’s on your workbench?   
    Much like @Callie Beller Diesel, I have a full plate tonight.  In celebration of my youtube channel reaching 100 subscribers I decided it was a good idea to throw 100 bowls.  Now that they're all drying at a rapid rate, I'm having second thoughts on how great of an idea it was! Haha
     


  9. Like
    GEP reacted to Callie Beller Diesel in What’s on your workbench?   
    Two down, 50 to go. 


  10. Like
    GEP reacted to Skip in L &L kiln slow to complete program   
    I was able to splice a new connector onto the old wire. The wire was in great shape and the new connector went on well and is firmly attached. The wire was not too short to easily be connected again with a bit of slack left. I just turned on the kiln and all the elements are working. Thank you so much for all of the help and suggestions from all who posted. It was a real help.
  11. Like
    GEP reacted to Callie Beller Diesel in Pug mill alternatives?   
    @liambesaw, are any of your shelves wire racking of any kind? If they are, they can be turned into temporary drying racks with the use of an old bedsheet. I don't use plaster because I don't really have the space for molds of any kind in my studio. To dry out reclaim slurry, I have one shelf on my wire racks that does the job, and goes back to regular shelf service as needed. 
     
    (Pardon the poorly lit image. I don't have a good way of getting a nice shot in this particular corner.)

  12. Like
    GEP got a reaction from Callie Beller Diesel in Pug mill alternatives?   
    I started a pottery business in 2002, and bought my pugmill in 2007. You can get by for a while with elbow grease. You are aware of how much they cost, so start putting aside money from your pottery sales as a “pugmill fund.” The day you come home with the pugmill you paid for in cash will be a big day. 
  13. Like
    GEP got a reaction from Chilly in Pug mill alternatives?   
    I started a pottery business in 2002, and bought my pugmill in 2007. You can get by for a while with elbow grease. You are aware of how much they cost, so start putting aside money from your pottery sales as a “pugmill fund.” The day you come home with the pugmill you paid for in cash will be a big day. 
  14. Like
    GEP got a reaction from Hulk in Pug mill alternatives?   
    I started a pottery business in 2002, and bought my pugmill in 2007. You can get by for a while with elbow grease. You are aware of how much they cost, so start putting aside money from your pottery sales as a “pugmill fund.” The day you come home with the pugmill you paid for in cash will be a big day. 
  15. Like
    GEP got a reaction from liambesaw in Pug mill alternatives?   
    I started a pottery business in 2002, and bought my pugmill in 2007. You can get by for a while with elbow grease. You are aware of how much they cost, so start putting aside money from your pottery sales as a “pugmill fund.” The day you come home with the pugmill you paid for in cash will be a big day. 
  16. Like
    GEP reacted to liambesaw in Pug mill alternatives?   
    Damn, I was hoping someone would talk me into getting a pugmill but it looks like I just need better manners.  Will start that tonight.
    Thanks guys and gals
  17. Like
    GEP got a reaction from liambesaw in Pug mill alternatives?   
    Yes, you definitely need the fines from the sludge. But they don’t need to be blunged in. They can be wedged in. 
    I use a bucket of throwing water for several days, until it becomes too thick for throwing, then toss it in the slop bucket. I usually add a little more water from the sink, but just a little. My trimmings are usually bone dry before I add the throwing water. 
    Flopped thrown pots can be smushed out on a plaster batt, then rewedged in a hour or so. I sometimes do that because I try to pug only as much clay that I need for one day. If I flop a large pot, I will need to reuse the clay in order to finish that day’s to-do list. 
  18. Like
    GEP got a reaction from liambesaw in Pug mill alternatives?   
    If you are mostly using one clay, the blunging is not necessary. It takes a lot of water to make the slop loose enough to blunge. You only need to add enough water to rehydrate the leatherhard parts. It will reach the right consistency a lot faster. Then wedge. Wedging will easily incorporate the small scraps of different clay. 
  19. Like
    GEP reacted to Hulk in Pug mill alternatives?   
    Five hun' pounds, wow!
    Make friends with a pugmill owner - give them a hun' pounds and leave it clean when you're done?
    I'm reclaiming three to four gallons at a time - slake in a five gallon bucket; mix, wait, mix, wait ...in same bucket (half inch drill moter+grout mixer); when it peaks like a meringue (days in summer, a few weeks in winter - what's the hurry?), hand out onto plaster slabs, waait; turn and wedge each lump periodically until just a bit wetter than ideal; bag it. From there, wedge, wedge, wedge before use - doesn't take long to dry up just a bit more... no doubt your current (deferred) procedure is similar. If you start with a smallish batch - perhaps as much as you have plaster slabs for - and keep at it, you'll whittle it down.
    What I'm curious 'bout, do you keep the various clays separate, or lump'm all together?
    Oooh, how long it takes to dry down from slake slurry to final wedge would be much longer where you are, hmm. I'm using large cake pan plaster slabs, over two inches thick - not much surface area on the sides, hence set on 1"x1"s to allow air to circulate underneath seems key (faster, and else there's damp shelving and mold!). Any chance you can set your slabs in living space, up high where warmest?
  20. Like
    GEP got a reaction from Hulk in Pug mill alternatives?   
    You don't need to de-air your clay in the vacuum chamber if you are still planning to wedge it. Wedging is a mixing and de-airing process.
    Even if you had a pugmill, you need to get the slop to the right moisture content before pugging. So you can still only process as much as your plaster/climate parameters can handle. The pugmill only saves you the effort of wedging. Which is a significant savings in terms of wear and tear, but it still takes work and a disciplined system to keep up with the reclaim. 
    I wrote a column for CM last year that details my reclaiming process. I can process 40 lbs at a time without needing extra space. It's done by stacking up a tower of plaster slabs. This does not require a pugmill. The reclaimed clay needs to be either wedged or pugged before using it again. But again, the key to my method is to not accumulate more than 40lbs of slop before processing it. 
    https://www.goodelephant.com/uploads/3/5/9/2/3592345/rhee_dec18cm.pdf
    You might be better off throwing out your 500 lbs of reclaim, because it might be impossible to process it all now. Clay is cheap, so it's not that big of a deal. Start over with a small slop bucket and keep up with it all the time. 
  21. Like
    GEP reacted to Callie Beller Diesel in Bermuda green mason stain turned grey   
    Arg. Sorry, the iPad died before I could edit that post properly. I didn’t read the original post as closely as I should have. 
    @liambesaw Nickel is sort of like Worcestershire sauce: kind of gross by itself, but adds depth and interest when blended with other things. Like Mea said, it’s in the grey/olive/brown range of colours.
  22. Like
    GEP got a reaction from Callie Beller Diesel in Bermuda green mason stain turned grey   
    I use a tiny bit of black nickel oxide in one of my gray glazes. It’s a neutral brown, kind of like iron oxide but without the red undertone. When combined with a tiny bit of cobalt carb, I get a pretty pale gray with a slightly blue undertone. 
  23. Like
    GEP got a reaction from liambesaw in Bermuda green mason stain turned grey   
    I use a tiny bit of black nickel oxide in one of my gray glazes. It’s a neutral brown, kind of like iron oxide but without the red undertone. When combined with a tiny bit of cobalt carb, I get a pretty pale gray with a slightly blue undertone. 
  24. Like
    GEP reacted to Min in Bermuda green mason stain turned grey   
    @emwhid324, the March 2019 Ceramics Monthly has an article from Allison Cochran on coloured porcelain slips. I can't attach the article here but in the image below test tile E is 5% Bermuda stain. Comparing it's colour to your sample it looks like you have way more than that in yours. To save your dark batch of porcelain you could try slice it up into thin pieces, dry them out and weigh out a test amount of 100 grams. Then take some dry unstained porcelain and weigh it out and do a line blend of the two. I think that if you dilute the current batch with unstained porcelain you'll get the green back.

  25. Like
    GEP got a reaction from Chilly in Trimming Hardened Clay   
    @motox you might want to try oil-based clay, otherwise known as “modeling clay.” Rather than air-dry clay or the water-based clays that need to be fired. Oil-based clay is used by sculptors. It doesn’t dry or shrink. It hardens when exposed to air or when it gets cold, but it can always be softened up again by warming it, 
    I don’t know much about making fairing models, but the car industry still sculpts car models using oil-based clay. 
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