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Dvd Vs. Book


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#1 Diz

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Posted 18 March 2014 - 06:31 PM

Hi All,

 

I enjoy all the info given in the CAD daily emails and enjoy watching the included video clips but I am 'old-school' and enjoy my books - the feel of the paper in my hands.  As much as I love the info shared in the videos, promoting the DVDs, I cannot bring myself to purchase a DVD (at $40-60) since I would have to use a DVD player each time I needed its info.  I would in a flash purchase many of the books about the same info.  At this point when I see a book to buy, I need to 'check my library' to see if it is a new book to me...and I am not into Kindles either.  Am I a lone dinosaur or are there others out there who feel the same way I do?

 

Diz

 

(Hope this is posted in the proper forum.)



#2 bciskepottery

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Posted 18 March 2014 - 06:55 PM

Both mediums have their strong and weak points. Books are more readily accessed; but sometimes the printed instructions and photographs just do not always convey a very tactile and visual process. Some books, like Bill Van Gilder's, use a lot of photos to show a step by step approach to various projects. Other books fall short. That said, not all DVDs are worth the money. When I watch a potter during a workshop, I pay particular attention to his/her hands and how the clay is manipulated. Good DVDs can capture that fairly well. Plus, I can stop, rewind, and replay. Some DVDs are not well made and don't give you enough close up detail of hands working and forming. Watching Linda Arbuckle flocculate and deflocculate a bucket of majolica glaze shows very well on DVD, but still photos could not capture the change in viscosity, etc.

So, it seems one needs to be open to both mediums, to take advantage of strengths and weaknesses. And, you need to find the medium that matches your learning style and comfort zone. For me, it really comes down to the subject matter of the book or DVD and what I'm looking to learn from that medium. I use both. My only wish was being more certain of the full DVD (or book) content before making the purchase. Some have met expectations; others have not. Some persons featured in DVDs are good at passing along their knowledge and technique and describing their actions; others make nice wares but are not good teachers or talk in monotones that make you lose interest.

I recently picked up a book on computer operating systems my spouse had bought; the top banner on the book stated: Read less, learn more. Still trying to figure that one out.

#3 Mark C.

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Posted 18 March 2014 - 10:04 PM

I own a library of books  on ceramics and no dvds on pottery.

That said as in above post  by bciskepottery the DVD format works for some things better -say like teaching throwing-its much easier to learn from watching the motion than stills in a book. 

If I was just starting out  learning this field the DVDs make more sense in some area's

$40 for a great book is still a deal-many this days do not use books anymore.

Welcome to the dinosaur club as I'm a fellow member who still buys books.

Mark


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#4 MollyTinsley

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Posted 19 March 2014 - 01:03 AM

I'm in Australia, so shipping from the US is prohibitively high. I don't even want to talk about buying glazes...... I LOVE the DVD downloads. I have four now, and will purchase more in the future. I wait until the ones I want are on special and snap 'em up for $20 or $30. I play them on both my computer, and on my mini iPad in my studio. I love being able to pause, rewind, pause, rewind... I am quite happy to pay the money as the DVD's are exceptionally good value and a similar length of workshop would cost hundreds. My only real issue is my difficulty in making the clay do what the presenter is making it do :) I have to keep reminding myself that this is someone with thirty years experience !!

 

I do also have a collection of books. I use these more for inspiration than technique. I recently purchased Frida Anthin's "Handmade Pottery At Home" http://www.amazon.co...95208647&sr=1-1 as I LOVE her work and she has very generously provided templates for a number of projects in her book...

 

But for me, the technique is in seeing how someone handles the clay. Although I love Frida's book, there is no way of knowing what state the clay is in. As soon as Sanda Pieratozzi picks up one of her slabs, you can immediately see how soft and floppy it is. How she doesn't leave fingermarks is a mystery to me, but you get the idea.

 

Oh, and I'm a bibliophile, for what its worth. I love books - I used to be a Librarian :) But for me, the value is in the practical application of the information; and for ceramics I do think the DVDs work better. Obviously something like glaze recipes would work better in a book though !



#5 Pres

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Posted 19 March 2014 - 08:17 AM

I am a mix of old and new when it comes to technology. I have a ceramics library of close to if not more than 200 volumes. I use a NOOK for my sci fi reading if I don't think anyone else would read the book. I buy novels in paper back that others might want to read, and loan them. Yes, we are renovating a room next year as a library.

 

Videos are something new for me. I have been viewing over the years utube shorts on throwing, and techniques. I had a list of links for my Ceramics 2 students of throwing videos they should watch. Lately through various means I have acquired some videos, and find them interesting. Sometimes I look for things that are not shown in the video, and have to figure it out on my own by looking at the result, but then most books would make you do that anyway.


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#6 Denice

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Posted 19 March 2014 - 08:33 AM

I'm with the old school also, books touch my soul, DVDs  not so much. I just realized that I had gotten some dvd's with a Ceramic Monthly subscription that I have never looked at. I'd rather be working with clay than reading or watching DVDs.  Denice



#7 High Bridge Pottery

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Posted 19 March 2014 - 12:51 PM

I prefer videos for the practical side, books for the technical side as then I can keep rereading until I understand what is going on  ^_^

 

Never bought anything from CAD as I am a tight bast....



#8 Stellaria

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Posted 23 March 2014 - 08:07 PM

I love books, but they don't help me a single bit with throwing, and the more technical books tend to put me to sleep. I read them anyway - just takes FOREVER. I've never bought an instructional DVD for pottery, though. I just search for what I want to see on youtube, watch videos on that thing from a few different potters to get a handle on what things everybody does, and what things are individual preference, and then I go experiment. I think I get a better education that way - I'm working only on the things I WANT to accomplish, and I'm not falling into the "it MUST be done THIS way" trap that you can get into if you're only reading, watching, or listening to a single instructor. I try to find three different potters to watch, at a minimum, for any technique I want to learn.



#9 Chilly

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Posted 24 March 2014 - 10:31 AM

 I try to find three different potters to watch, at a minimum, for any technique I want to learn.

I got confused as they all did things different, so after a break, only watched one (really good) person onYouTube, and found that helped.  We're all different, and luckily there are as many different ways to learn as there are people :)


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#10 Stellaria

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Posted 24 March 2014 - 11:27 AM

Out of curiosity, which one did you settle on?

#11 Chilly

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Posted 25 March 2014 - 03:29 AM

Tim See - loads on YouTube, and occasionally he posts on here.  I like his professionalism and consistency, and lack of waffle.  Many others seem like they thought, hey I can do this I'll make a video, without any preparation or planning.


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#12 Stellaria

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Posted 25 March 2014 - 03:35 AM

Cool - I'll have to check him out. I'm surprised I haven't run across him yet!

#13 Mug

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Posted 25 March 2014 - 10:43 AM

I read for two years, before even contemplating picking up clay. Needless to say I love books, and have purchased quite a few. I find it quicker to search for technical information that I have read. The pricey videos I have paid for usually only get watched once. The free videos on you tube are an endless pool of knowledge. I find they help with technique, productive timing, and show more than one way to skin a cat. When I started the actual hands on experimentation, the videos have been more usefull, but there are only a few that I would wish to purchase. I like Philippe Faraut, and may purchase his videos next.

 

 I have watched Simon Leach...I think he is a great teacher, but He is a bit wordy at times.

Never heard of Tim...just watched one of his videos...Good stuff



#14 Stellaria

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Posted 25 March 2014 - 12:13 PM

I let Simon Leach put me to sleep when I can't get my brain to shut up at night :D Pick a nice long video where you know he's going to talk a lot.




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