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Custom Made Extruder Dies


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#1 oldlady

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Posted 31 August 2013 - 11:01 AM

has anyone had these things made in a machine shop?

 

my first attempts in plastic work but i want perfect ones.

 

my daughter found a site online which produces dies from cad software.  the price is by a quantity of 12.  is anyone interested in exploring the possibilities?


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#2 bciskepottery

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Posted 31 August 2013 - 11:25 AM

Northstar will cut custom dies -- in quantities of one. 

 

There might be a mill or fabricating shop around your area where they do metal work . . . either the shop of one of the workers may be willing to cut them for you. 



#3 jrgpots

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Posted 31 August 2013 - 02:14 PM

I had a local machinist make tow dies for extruding tubes.  The larger tube extrudes an inner diameter of 1.13 in with a wall thickness of 3/16 in.  The smaller dies extrudes a tube  of 0.825 in with a wall dia. of 3/16 in.  When the clay tubes are dried and fired, the resulting inner diameters are 1 in and 3/4 in respectively.  I use a  4 inch round scott extruder. 1/8 in aluminum was used in making the dies.  They cost me $65.00 to have them made.  But I make a lot of 1 in and 3/4 in flutes that need to be as close to these diameters as possible.  I considered it an investment. 

 

I made two dies from Lexan plastic that worked "OK" prior to having these dies made....  It is probably overkill.

 

Bottom line...expect to pay $30 - 40 a die from a machinist.

 

Jed


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#4 Mark C.

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Posted 31 August 2013 - 03:38 PM

I only use custom made dies-I make mine out of aluminum blanks from brent.You draw it on the metal then drill a hole into the cut out in a vise then use a jewlers saw (art degree is handy here) and saw the thing out then use jewlers files to smooth up and then you have a lifetime die. All my handle dies are made this  way as well as my soap dish-I also have mad some large diameter tubes.

As another person noted Northstar has advertised making one off dies in plastic for you-I would go with them if making them yourself is to much.The ad is in most clay magazines. CM for sure.

Mark


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#5 Denice

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Posted 31 August 2013 - 10:38 PM

I have made dies from several mediums but found the plastic cutting board I used the best.  I needed a complicated molding die, I spray glued the pattern to the die and cut out most of the pattern with a drill press, located and drilled small holes for the u-bolts. Then I used small files to square corners and then used a fine sand paper to finish.  I still haven't replaced that cutting board from my kitchen but I have a lot of blanks for future projects.   Denice 



#6 justanassembler

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Posted 31 August 2013 - 11:11 PM

Ive been cutting custom dies for myself using a jewelers saw as mark offered above, recently I have had access to a laser cutter and I've been cutting sheets of 1/4" acryllic and laminating them together--that seems to work really well.  I have access to a milling machine and have been working on some designs to cut on that thing too.  What are you looking for, old lady?



#7 oldlady

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Posted 01 September 2013 - 03:28 PM

wow!  what i am looking for is similar to a design shown on page 92 in the Lark book Extruded Ceramics by Diana Pancioli. it is a curve with feet and a rim that would be used for making long bread trays for french bread.  i cut one out of plastic but i missed one of the feet and have only a slight curve for that foot.  it is also a little thicker than i wanted because the plastic melted and had to be recut several times.  i am going to take a photo of the one i made and the bread tray and post it as soon as i can get it into the computer.  please advise what i should do next.  thank you.


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#8 oldlady

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Posted 01 September 2013 - 04:51 PM

i hope these come out.

Attached Files


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#9 oldlady

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Posted 01 September 2013 - 04:57 PM

 thank you pazu.  i will contact tametal works but my extruder is a round one.  started trying to post picture at 3:29.  got it up at 4:51.  do not know if i could do it again.


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#10 bciskepottery

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Posted 01 September 2013 - 06:54 PM

Here is the Northstar version . . .

 

http://www.northstar...in_dies/928.htm

 

 



#11 Mark C.

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Posted 01 September 2013 - 07:04 PM

North star will make whatever shape and die you ask for. Its a cad- program-send them the shape and diameter for die they will make it.

Mark


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#12 oldlady

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Posted 01 September 2013 - 08:06 PM

thanks, will contact them after the holiday.


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#13 Pres

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Posted 03 September 2013 - 09:16 AM

I sued to cut plastic or metal dies using a drill press to start. I would use a series of holes drilled where the end  points and other points were, then use a scroll saw with a regular blade or a jewelers blade. finished these with a set of jewelery files. Later I used a dremel sanding drum on a slow speed. Too fast and the plastic melts.


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#14 oldlady

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Posted 03 September 2013 - 10:03 AM

thanks, that is what i did.  but i don't have a jewelers blade or jewelry files. does it matter that much?

 

has anyone tried a Rotozip blade in the drill press?  i want to try it and see if it will allow me the freedom of a router while allowing better visibility.  or i have to dig out the router itself.


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#15 Pres

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Posted 03 September 2013 - 10:18 AM

Those blades are made for high speed cutting. However, it may be worth trying. I don't have access to a drill press anymore or an extruder. :unsure:


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#16 justanassembler

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Posted 03 September 2013 - 10:19 AM

Old lady,
I would not use a rotozip or similar bit in your drill press.  Reason being (aside from lack of safety) is that the quill on your drill press is not meant to be stressed laterally, and you risk damaging it and knocking it out of true, rendering your drill press fairly useless.



#17 Denice

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Posted 03 September 2013 - 10:22 AM

I think using the files to clean up the dies make a big difference in how the clay extrudes through them, I used regular files and jewelers files.  My plastic cutting board material was three eights of an inch thick so it was important to keep the cut out area square and straight.  The idea of the scroll saw is good, I have one just didn't think of using it.  Denice



#18 dave the potter

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Posted 03 September 2013 - 10:28 AM

If you already have the router, you might try a router table. You can find them at most places that sell tools. You can see where you are going a lot better than using the router the conventional way.



#19 oldlady

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Posted 03 September 2013 - 05:06 PM

thanks, all.  will investigate all alternatives.  now that i am home i can call northstar.

 

edit...............called them, tim can do it for about $45;  i will try again first.


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#20 oldlady

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Posted 07 September 2013 - 06:04 PM

SORRY, Been out of action due to a dental problem and will not be able to do much for the next two weeks,  big show deadline coming up.

 

i did correct the die that i made.  used the big clamp and set the drill press to add just enough of a cut to make the foot right.  found that the cutting board plastic from Dollar Tree cuts straight, doesn't melt and is thin enough for my holder.  the bottom of the extruder i have cannot take 1/2 inch thick dies so i am working on other stuff right now.

 

i did not realize how easily the square hollow extrusions twist.  how does anyone make straight things????


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