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My first teapot


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#1 atanzey

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Posted 03 July 2013 - 04:22 PM

My very first attempt at a tea pot. I had to share with someone who (might!) care.

Alice

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#2 Chris Campbell

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Posted 03 July 2013 - 04:54 PM

Good for you!! Teapots are difficult and this one is not bad at all for a first one.
Congrats!

Chris Campbell
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#3 Benzine

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Posted 03 July 2013 - 05:11 PM

Better than my first teapot.

How are you going to glaze it?
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#4 clay lover

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Posted 03 July 2013 - 05:12 PM

Way to go, Alice. Very nice pot.

#5 atanzey

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Posted 03 July 2013 - 05:29 PM

Thanks, all!

Glaze?? We have to see if it survives bisque, first! But seriously, for some reason, I'm seeing this in Spearmint, from Mastering Cone 6 - mine has a bit extra copper, so it comes out sort of bright forest green, and typically goes a little glossy. I gotta develop some interesting glaze combinations, but throwing/firing/glazing are just now starting to come together, so I'm mostly still in the 'uninspired' glaze category. Maybe I'll make it purple. That one comes out consistently good.

Alice

#6 OffCenter

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Posted 03 July 2013 - 05:51 PM

Looks good. I especially like the handle. Post a pic or two after it has been glaze fired.

Jim
E pur si muove.

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#7 atanzey

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Posted 03 July 2013 - 07:09 PM

Will do! (Assuming it survives!)

Alice

#8 Mudlark

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Posted 03 July 2013 - 07:23 PM

My very first attempt at a tea pot. I had to share with someone who (might!) care.

Alice

Alice it looks remarkably like my first attempt and has the same fault - the spout is too low ! As I filled it up the water poured out. I still have it after 30 years to remind me to think things through, not that it always works but that is one of the attractions of ceramics there is always something new to learn.
Mudlark

#9 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 03 July 2013 - 09:06 PM

Nice pot but I have to agree with Mudlark.
The spout is too low. That means you can't fill the pot.
Good first shot at the teapot. They are the most complex pot to make in my opinion.
Fire it. Pour from it. Use it. Then make more...improved from first hand experience.

Marcia

#10 Pres

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 12:50 AM

My very first attempt at a tea pot. I had to share with someone who (might!) care.

Alice


If I might presume, I posted a topic on my blog on teapots, it includes an illustration that I used with students working on their Ceramics 2 benchmarks. You may find it helpful, maybe not.

http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/

And I would also say that the spout is a little too low. I also wonder what the lid galley looks like. First teapots are difficult, as there is so much to think about in the different parts functioning as a whole.

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#11 minspargal

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 07:24 AM

Good job for first attempt! Teapots are quite a challenge!

#12 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 08:10 AM


My very first attempt at a tea pot. I had to share with someone who (might!) care.

Alice


If I might presume, I posted a topic on my blog on teapots, it includes an illustration that I used with students working on their Ceramics 2 benchmarks. You may find it helpful, maybe not.

http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/

And I would also say that the spout is a little too low. I also wonder what the lid galley looks like. First teapots are difficult, as there is so much to think about in the different parts functioning as a whole.

Great tutorials, Pres.
I am sure your students got a lot from your teaching.
Marcia

#13 atanzey

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 08:12 AM

The bottom of the spout is about center on the lug of the handle, so it couldn't be filled to the brim, but it is better than it appears from this angle. I'll take some photos of the galley - it turned out relatively okay, but not great. I also put a lug on the lid, to help prevent it falling off, but I think it shrunk too much to help. We'll see how it all works after it's fired!

Alice

#14 Pres

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 10:52 AM

Great tutorials, Pres.
I am sure your students got a lot from your teaching.
Marcia

thank you for your kind word, I put some effort into documenting the construction of the teapots in hopes that others might be able to bypass some of the hurdles. I am thinking of using the blog more as a "new classroom", as it is obvious to me that I miss the teaching, just not the bull )(*&)(.

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#15 Wyndham

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 11:16 AM

Good start down the teapot road. There's a lot of expression that can come out of this form as you go along.

Pres,
I like the "hoop" idea, useful in several forms, ah, salt pig?

Wyndham

#16 Kohaku

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 01:24 PM

Pres,
I like the "hoop" idea, useful in several forms, ah, salt pig?


I agree. I've just started down the 'cut and re-assemble' pathway... and I'd been looking for fast, convenient ways to inscribe clean cut lines on curved objects. Cheers for the tip.
Not all who wander are lost

#17 Benzine

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 05:49 PM


My very first attempt at a tea pot. I had to share with someone who (might!) care.

Alice


If I might presume, I posted a topic on my blog on teapots, it includes an illustration that I used with students working on their Ceramics 2 benchmarks. You may find it helpful, maybe not.

http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/

And I would also say that the spout is a little too low. I also wonder what the lid galley looks like. First teapots are difficult, as there is so much to think about in the different parts functioning as a whole.


Very nice Pres. I may have to "Borrow" that, if you don't mind.

I will admit, my first, and second, teapots had spouts that were too low as well, both in angle and positioning. It's not something I would think about, and the book(s) I was taking my cues from, didn't seem to mention that concept.
"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#18 Pres

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 09:27 PM

I like the "hoop" idea, useful in several forms, ah, salt pig?

Works well for salt pigs, have already done it. Think about this one canister sets. . . If you notice it does some helpful things for the teapots with lid galleys, even though the water line is lowered a little.


Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#19 Pres

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 09:28 PM

Great thing about the embroidery hoops is . . . they are cheap!

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#20 Pres

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 09:30 PM

I put things up on the blog to be used, not abused. the only time I would get angry is if someone "borrowed" something of mine, and then took credit. That is abusive. I would shudder to think that any one here would do that, especially benzine.Posted Image

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/





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