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atanzey

My first teapot

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Thanks, all!

 

Glaze?? We have to see if it survives bisque, first! But seriously, for some reason, I'm seeing this in Spearmint, from Mastering Cone 6 - mine has a bit extra copper, so it comes out sort of bright forest green, and typically goes a little glossy. I gotta develop some interesting glaze combinations, but throwing/firing/glazing are just now starting to come together, so I'm mostly still in the 'uninspired' glaze category. Maybe I'll make it purple. That one comes out consistently good.

 

Alice

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My very first attempt at a tea pot. I had to share with someone who (might!) care.

 

Alice

 

Alice it looks remarkably like my first attempt and has the same fault - the spout is too low ! As I filled it up the water poured out. I still have it after 30 years to remind me to think things through, not that it always works but that is one of the attractions of ceramics there is always something new to learn.

Mudlark

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Nice pot but I have to agree with Mudlark.

The spout is too low. That means you can't fill the pot.

Good first shot at the teapot. They are the most complex pot to make in my opinion.

Fire it. Pour from it. Use it. Then make more...improved from first hand experience.

 

Marcia

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My very first attempt at a tea pot. I had to share with someone who (might!) care.

 

Alice

 

If I might presume, I posted a topic on my blog on teapots, it includes an illustration that I used with students working on their Ceramics 2 benchmarks. You may find it helpful, maybe not.

 

http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/

 

And I would also say that the spout is a little too low. I also wonder what the lid galley looks like. First teapots are difficult, as there is so much to think about in the different parts functioning as a whole.

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My very first attempt at a tea pot. I had to share with someone who (might!) care.

 

Alice

 

If I might presume, I posted a topic on my blog on teapots, it includes an illustration that I used with students working on their Ceramics 2 benchmarks. You may find it helpful, maybe not.

 

http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/

 

And I would also say that the spout is a little too low. I also wonder what the lid galley looks like. First teapots are difficult, as there is so much to think about in the different parts functioning as a whole.

Great tutorials, Pres.

I am sure your students got a lot from your teaching.

Marcia

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The bottom of the spout is about center on the lug of the handle, so it couldn't be filled to the brim, but it is better than it appears from this angle. I'll take some photos of the galley - it turned out relatively okay, but not great. I also put a lug on the lid, to help prevent it falling off, but I think it shrunk too much to help. We'll see how it all works after it's fired!

 

Alice

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Great tutorials, Pres.
I am sure your students got a lot from your teaching.
Marcia


thank you for your kind words, I put some effort into documenting the construction of the teapots in hopes that others might be able to bypass some of the hurdles. I am thinking of using the blog more as a "new classroom", as it is obvious to me that I miss the teaching, just not the bull )(*&)(.

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Good start down the teapot road. There's a lot of expression that can come out of this form as you go along.

 

Pres,

I like the "hoop" idea, useful in several forms, ah, salt pig?

 

Wyndham

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Pres,

I like the "hoop" idea, useful in several forms, ah, salt pig?

 

I agree. I've just started down the 'cut and re-assemble' pathway... and I'd been looking for fast, convenient ways to inscribe clean cut lines on curved objects. Cheers for the tip.

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My very first attempt at a tea pot. I had to share with someone who (might!) care.

 

Alice

 

If I might presume, I posted a topic on my blog on teapots, it includes an illustration that I used with students working on their Ceramics 2 benchmarks. You may find it helpful, maybe not.

 

http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/

 

And I would also say that the spout is a little too low. I also wonder what the lid galley looks like. First teapots are difficult, as there is so much to think about in the different parts functioning as a whole.

 

Very nice Pres. I may have to "Borrow" that, if you don't mind.

 

I will admit, my first, and second, teapots had spouts that were too low as well, both in angle and positioning. It's not something I would think about, and the book(s) I was taking my cues from, didn't seem to mention that concept.

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I like the "hoop" idea, useful in several forms, ah, salt pig?

 

Works well for salt pigs, have already done it. Think about this one canister sets. . . If you notice it does some helpful things for the teapots with lid galleys, even though the water line is lowered a little.

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I put things up on the blog to be used, not abused. the only time I would get angry is if someone "borrowed" something of mine, and then took credit. That is abusive. I would shudder to think that any one here would do that, especially benzine.smile.gif

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I put things up on the blog to be used, not abused. the only time I would get angry is if someone "borrowed" something of mine, and then took credit. That is abusive. I would shudder to think that any one here would do that, especially benzine.smile.gif

 

Like I tell my students all the time, "I'm not even going to pretend that something that clever is my idea." I'm not saying I haven't come up with a couple project ideas, and approaches, but I've borrowed and altered quite a few projects, from other teachers/ instructors.

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Great thing about the embroidery hoops is . . . they are cheap!

 

 

I just bought 4 round quilting hoops (big versions of embroidery hoops) and one oblong quilting hoop for slump molds. The largest size I could get is 23 inches. I don't know if this is common knowledge or not, but you can buy t-shirt material (called jersey) at fabric shops cut out a circle to fit into the quilting hoop. It is so stretchy that when you put a slab of clay in it, it forms a bowl shape. You can use a large ball to push the slab down for a deeper bowl and can adjust the slack in the material for different shapes. Quilting hoops are perfect for this. Since I can't find any bigger than 23 inches I also bought a few hula hoops and stretch the fabric there held with lots of clamps.

 

Jim

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Great thing about the embroidery hoops is . . . they are cheap!

 

 

I just bought 4 round quilting hoops (big versions of embroidery hoops) and one oblong quilting hoop for slump molds. The largest size I could get is 23 inches. I don't know if this is common knowledge or not, but you can buy t-shirt material (called jersey) at fabric shops cut out a circle to fit into the quilting hoop. It is so stretchy that when you put a slab of clay in it, it forms a bowl shape. You can use a large ball to push the slab down for a deeper bowl and can adjust the slack in the material for different shapes. Quilting hoops are perfect for this. Since I can't find any bigger than 23 inches I also bought a few hula hoops and stretch the fabric there held with lots of clamps.

 

Jim

 

 

Great ideas, Jim. Hmmm Hoola hoops are flexy, so you could get nice oval forms also.

OffCenter likes this

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 I don't know if this is common knowledge or not, but you can buy t-shirt material (called jersey) at fabric shops cut out a circle to fit into the quilting hoop. It is so stretchy that when you put a slab of clay in it, it forms a bowl shape.

 

 

Thanks for that: I've got a couple of sling moulds, (that's what I know them as) but I've never been entirely happy with the material I've used for the sling, I'll try and source some t-shirt material,  (ayjay wanders off to find a fat person's washing line).ohmy.png

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