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What Every Potter Needs!

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Mark C.    1,797

Jim I think those were used originally for milking goats and lamas

in barns.

Mark

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Kohaku    22

Somehow, Bernard Leach managed to hide his whenever the photogs were in the studio... but he used one. I know it. No way he pulled off that white shirt and natty tie otherwise...

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TJR    359

I'm straight out of the sixties and never threw in a dress.

 

 

Denise;

I have to admit that I never threw in a dress either. Turning the corner on 60 next month.

tom.

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annekat    3

I'm straight out of the sixties and never threw in a dress.

 

Oh, I never meant to imply that many, or any, potters during the 60's would throw in a dress! I thought though, that the style of dress and her hair, etc., was sort of 60's looking. And to me, the dress was a give-away that maybe she wasn't a real potter, but just posing. I also noticed none of the other people in the photo were using this gizmo! As for people like Bernard Leach, I have no doubt there have been some potters who dressed quite well while throwing. I know a woman who would wear long sleeves buttoned down while teaching a throwing class and manage to get nothing on them! That just isn't me, or most of us, I'd imagine!

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Pres    896

I'm straight out of the sixties and never threw in a dress.

 

Oh, I never meant to imply that many, or any, potters during the 60's would throw in a dress! I thought though, that the style of dress and her hair, etc., was sort of 60's looking. And to me, the dress was a give-away that maybe she wasn't a real potter, but just posing. I also noticed none of the other people in the photo were using this gizmo! As for people like Bernard Leach, I have no doubt there have been some potters who dressed quite well while throwing. I know a woman who would wear long sleeves buttoned down while teaching a throwing class and manage to get nothing on them! That just isn't me, or most of us, I'd imagine!

 

 

I was expected to wear a tie everyday at my HS. I wore button down shirts always, rolled up the sleeves when throwing, mostly tucked the tie into the shirt. Threw often without an apron, sometimes with. scungy pads were a life saver, as they would remove 90% of the dry clay from the shirt, pants and tie. I guess I always looked like I had just gotten up from a messy meal, but all brown hhhhhhhhh hhhh!ohmy.gif

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OffCenter    82

I'm straight out of the sixties and never threw in a dress.

 

Oh, I never meant to imply that many, or any, potters during the 60's would throw in a dress! I thought though, that the style of dress and her hair, etc., was sort of 60's looking. And to me, the dress was a give-away that maybe she wasn't a real potter, but just posing. I also noticed none of the other people in the photo were using this gizmo! As for people like Bernard Leach, I have no doubt there have been some potters who dressed quite well while throwing. I know a woman who would wear long sleeves buttoned down while teaching a throwing class and manage to get nothing on them! That just isn't me, or most of us, I'd imagine!

 

 

Two very famous and much-loved potters, Nan and Jim McKinnell, were always well-dressed for the pottery classes they taught. Nan used silk handkerchiefs to wipe the clay off her fingers and Jim always wore a bow tie.

 

Jim

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annekat    3

It also has occurred to me that if this girl was in a high school pottery class, she may have had no choice but to wear a dress! When I was in high school at the end of the sixties, they were just starting to allow girls to wear pants to school at times other than when it snowed. I did not take pottery in high school, however.

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Idaho Potter    62

Don't you think she also did crowd control at various plebian uprisings? All she needed was helmet and baton.

 

I think annekat got it right--the picture is from the 60's. Who dreamed up the protective shields and what did they call them? Jim, we need more info on this. The twins really look posed, so was it a lead in to a pitch to sell these things?

 

 

 

I've had women sign up for classes and shown up dressed like they were going to afternoon tea. One finger in the moist clay was enough to convince them that they changed their minds. Even explaining in detail the process, and suggesting what to wear didn't seem to help. That's when I started having "orientation meetings" before classes started. I insisted they get their hands dirty and offered to let them try centering. No dilettantes ended up taking the classes.

 

 

Shirley

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annekat    3

And then there were the women who refused to cut their long, manicured nails, yet still wanted to be able to throw that way! Which also brings to mind people who insisted on working with the right hand inside the pot and the left hand on the outside, at the 8:00 position, with the wheel spinning counterclockwise......

 

I am actually surprised more people are not turned off by the sheer messiness of it, me included.

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annekat    3

Jim, we need more info on this. The twins really look posed, so was it a lead in to a pitch to sell these things?

 

Shirley

 

 

I wondered if they were twins or it was just a trick photo.... you are probably right that they were twins. I, too, would like to know more..... was this an ad in an old Ceramics Monthly issue?

 

 

 

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OffCenter    82

Jim, we need more info on this. The twins really look posed, so was it a lead in to a pitch to sell these things?

 

Shirley

 

 

I wondered if they were twins or it was just a trick photo.... you are probably right that they were twins. I, too, would like to know more..... was this an ad in an old Ceramics Monthly issue?

 

 

 

 

 

I found it on Facebook. There was no caption or explanation, it was just one of a series of pictures. Mark is probably right about it being used to milk some animals. I suppose animals that don't like to be milked. I own llamas and goats and would want to add a helmet and face shield to that if I ever decide to try to milk a llama.

 

Jim

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Matt Oz    67

It's a Captain Ceramics splash guard, watch this video to see it and many other wonderful Captain Ceramic products like pre-centered clay...

 

 

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Nancy S.    21

 

I found it on Facebook. There was no caption or explanation, it was just one of a series of pictures. Mark is probably right about it being used to milk some animals. I suppose animals that don't like to be milked. I own llamas and goats and would want to add a helmet and face shield to that if I ever decide to try to milk a llama.

 

Jim

 

 

I know a guy with a dairy farm who got kicked in the head by one of his cows....broke his neck! (He's ok, though.)

 

 

If I had to wear a dress all the time, I'd need one of those shields, too!!

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OffCenter    82

It's a Captain Ceramics splash guard, watch this video to see it and many other wonderful Captain Ceramic products like pre-centered clay...

 

 

 

 

That's a great video! Thanks for posting it.

 

Jim

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Benzine    609

I'm straight out of the sixties and never threw in a dress.

 

Oh, I never meant to imply that many, or any, potters during the 60's would throw in a dress! I thought though, that the style of dress and her hair, etc., was sort of 60's looking. And to me, the dress was a give-away that maybe she wasn't a real potter, but just posing. I also noticed none of the other people in the photo were using this gizmo! As for people like Bernard Leach, I have no doubt there have been some potters who dressed quite well while throwing. I know a woman who would wear long sleeves buttoned down while teaching a throwing class and manage to get nothing on them! That just isn't me, or most of us, I'd imagine!

 

 

Two very famous and much-loved potters, Nan and Jim McKinnell, were always well-dressed for the pottery classes they taught. Nan used silk handkerchiefs to wipe the clay off her fingers and Jim always wore a bow tie.

 

Jim

 

 

My Ceramics instructor in college, wore nice shoes, khaki pants, and a button up or polo shirt every day. He threw so fast, and with a minimal amount of water, he never got anything on him. Even with all the demos, and his own bit of work, that he would do, during the class, I never saw that he got anything on him, clay, glaze, etc.

 

In regards to the posted picture, that looks like something you'd use, if the clay body contained ground uranium......Hey, glow in the dark pots!!!

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annekat    3

The Captain Ceramics video was quite funny. More of a 70's time frame than 60's, it turns out. I thought the Glazing Grippers, or whatever they called them, looked like they might actually work!

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The link isn't working for me so I feel like I am missing out. But i must say that I made the mistake once by throwing in a long skirt. (it wasn't a formal skirt, just like a long hippy skirt) It got all twisted in my kick wheel and in struggling to get it unwrapped I flopped the bowl I was working on. LMAO!!! Never again!!!

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Benzine    609

The link isn't working for me so I feel like I am missing out. But i must say that I made the mistake once by throwing in a long skirt. (it wasn't a formal skirt, just like a long hippy skirt) It got all twisted in my kick wheel and in struggling to get it unwrapped I flopped the bowl I was working on. LMAO!!! Never again!!!

 

 

I always tell my students, to watch out for loose items, while on the kick wheels; shoe laces, long belts, etc. Luckily, the only things I've had happen are when an apron, draped across the lap, was pulled off, not to mention the contless flip flops that get pull/ launched off the students' feet.

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The link isn't working for me so I feel like I am missing out. But i must say that I made the mistake once by throwing in a long skirt. (it wasn't a formal skirt, just like a long hippy skirt) It got all twisted in my kick wheel and in struggling to get it unwrapped I flopped the bowl I was working on. LMAO!!! Never again!!!

 

 

I always tell my students, to watch out for loose items, while on the kick wheels; shoe laces, long belts, etc. Luckily, the only things I've had happen are when an apron, draped across the lap, was pulled off, not to mention the contless flip flops that get pull/ launched off the students' feet.

 

 

Good thing the skirt incident happened in my basement, it nearly unclothed me!

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