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Crack filling--Magic Water and Paper Clay?


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#1 Nelly

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Posted 17 July 2012 - 11:46 AM

Dear All,

Can you put two pieces that have fallen off with a combination of paper clay and Magic Water? I had a braid fall off of one of my student pieces. I slipped and scored and applied a paste of toilet paper, slip from the same clay body and magic water??

I packed the crack and the site around the braid. If this doesn't take I am guessing the alternatives are: 1) wait until the piece fires and simply glaze and using epoxy reattach; 2) use some silica (which I don't have) and gently put these back together before firing; and 3) place the braid right next to the joint and apply glaze liberally and hope and pray.

What is magic water? I know it is supposed to be good stuff so I bought it when I got my clay supplies but haven't used it yet. Will it be a good adherent? Am I on the right track in terms of mending this piece?

Do know that the piece is wrapped now and I am trying to dry it slowly again with the crack filler.

Nelly

#2 Nelly

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Posted 17 July 2012 - 11:51 AM

Dear All,

Sorry for the above question. I did find this site that said that I am on the right track with my mending approach.

http://lakesidepotte...-paper-clay.htm

Nelly

#3 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 17 July 2012 - 03:37 PM

That is a good site. I have used paper clay to repair both green and bisque ware.
I use a toilet paper and clay body recipe with vinegar, karo syrup and a little water.
For bisque repair I wet the bisqued area very well and then add the paper clay. It works.
Marcia

#4 yedrow

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Posted 17 July 2012 - 08:16 PM

Sometimes you can mix some table salt or Epson salt into your slip, and use this to join parts. The salt can help flux the clay parts and help in sticking. Keep in mind though that salt is a flux in the kiln too and you need to wipe away any excess.

#5 Nelly

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Posted 17 July 2012 - 09:42 PM

Sometimes you can mix some table salt or Epson salt into your slip, and use this to join parts. The salt can help flux the clay parts and help in sticking. Keep in mind though that salt is a flux in the kiln too and you need to wipe away any excess.


Dear Yedrow,

When you say "flux" what exactly do you mean?? I have heard that salt in an electric kiln can produce noxious gases and cause damage to the kiln wiring. When you say flux do you mean that it may melt??

Thank you all for your responses.

Nelly

#6 Isculpt

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Posted 18 July 2012 - 08:54 AM

That is a good site. I have used paper cal to repair both green and bisque ware.
I use a toilet paper and clay body recipe with vinegar, karo syrup and a little water.
For bisque repair I wet the bisqued area very well and then add the paper clay. It works.
Marcia


Marcia, I like your ingredients for making a paper clay mud! May I ask for proportions & instructions on using the vinegar, karo, and water?
Thanks, Jayne

#7 Nelly

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Posted 18 July 2012 - 09:27 AM


That is a good site. I have used paper cal to repair both green and bisque ware.
I use a toilet paper and clay body recipe with vinegar, karo syrup and a little water.
For bisque repair I wet the bisqued area very well and then add the paper clay. It works.
Marcia


Marcia, I like your ingredients for making a paper clay mud! May I ask for proportions & instructions on using the vinegar, karo, and water?
Thanks, Jayne


Dear Marcia,

I have never heard of using Karo syrup before. I am guessing Karo is the same as corn syrup. So far so good. My piece is holding and I have been building layers up slowly. Will see what happens. Thank you for the vinegar and karo suggestions. It is helpful to have this information.

Nelly

#8 ~janie

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Posted 18 July 2012 - 11:30 AM

I use paper clay slip for just about all my joins, and paper clay and slip for repairs. My formula is slip from whatever clay I am using, a drop or two of dish detergent, to help with the mold, and a dash of sodium silicate, or other suitable defloculant (not too much). Add an amount (30-40% volume of slip) of paper that has been shredded and soaked in boiling water until the water cools. Drain the paper, reserving the liquid to make more slip, mix it all together, using a blender or juicer, and it is ready to go.

I attach all kinds of things with this stuff. Bisque to bisque, green to green, green to bisque, and repair glazed pieces and refire. You don't need to worry about it drying too fast, it will be just fine. I have used it to adhere different types of clay. No problem seems to be too bad for paper clay.

For big cracks, I dry some of my slip mixture on a plaster bat and use it to roll coils. For easy application of the slip in hard-to-reach places, use a cake decorating bag filled with the not-too-wet slip, and pipe it into the cracks.

I love paper clay for repairs. I may one day get around to actually making something with all paper clay.Posted Image

#9 Nelly

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Posted 18 July 2012 - 11:38 AM

I use paper clay slip for just about all my joins, and paper clay and slip for repairs. My formula is slip from whatever clay I am using, a drop or two of dish detergent, to help with the mold, and a dash of sodium silicate, or other suitable defloculant (not too much). Add an amount (30-40% volume of slip) of paper that has been shredded and soaked in boiling water until the water cools. Drain the paper, reserving the liquid to make more slip, mix it all together, using a blender or juicer, and it is ready to go.

I attach all kinds of things with this stuff. Bisque to bisque, green to green, green to bisque, and repair glazed pieces and refire. You don't need to worry about it drying too fast, it will be just fine. I have used it to adhere different types of clay. No problem seems to be too bad for paper clay.

For big cracks, I dry some of my slip mixture on a plaster bat and use it to roll coils. For easy application of the slip in hard-to-reach places, use a cake decorating bag filled with the not-too-wet slip, and pipe it into the cracks.

I love paper clay for repairs. I may one day get around to actually making something with all paper clay.Posted Image


Dear All,

I have a jug of slip that I use for joining. I have also used vinegar straight- up on the seams I don't want to split open. I add this after I slip and score. I must say, I pay attention to detail and slow drying so having something split or break off is a bit new to me.

I am the type that wraps my handles individually with 2 inch strips of plastic to ensure adhesion I am that preoccupied with drying times and no cracks.

Nelly

#10 ayjay

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Posted 18 July 2012 - 04:40 PM

If I had to repair an already bisqued piece with magic-water/paper-clay would I need to bisque fire the repaired piece or just glaze fire after the repair has dried?

#11 ~janie

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Posted 19 July 2012 - 08:47 AM

Just repair it and glaze. Let it dry in between, and let it dry well after glazing, before firing.

#12 ayjay

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Posted 19 July 2012 - 12:44 PM

Just repair it and glaze. Let it dry in between, and let it dry well after glazing, before firing.


Thank you. :)

#13 metal and mud

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Posted 19 July 2012 - 01:22 PM

Just repair it and glaze. Let it dry in between, and let it dry well after glazing, before firing.



Does anyone use Magic Mender?

#14 docweathers

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Posted 19 July 2012 - 04:32 PM

For what it is worth, I am experimenting with Axner Kiln Patch to mend cracks on bisqueware. Has anyone else tried this stuff?

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#15 Mark C.

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Posted 19 July 2012 - 11:18 PM

I have had good results with Amacos bisque fix
Mark
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#16 yedrow

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Posted 20 July 2012 - 10:40 AM

I've read that you can mend cracks in bisque by mixing 90% ground bisque, 5% glaze, and 5% gum. I've yet to try it though.

#17 Nelly

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Posted 20 July 2012 - 11:58 AM

I have had good results with Amacos bisque fix
Mark


Dear Mark,

I did look this stuff up. I think it means that you take two bisque pieces and put them back together again with this compound. I will watch for it when I am in the pottery store next. Looks good.

Thank you,

Nelly

#18 Nelly

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Posted 20 July 2012 - 12:03 PM

I've read that you can mend cracks in bisque by mixing 90% ground bisque, 5% glaze, and 5% gum. I've yet to try it though.


Sounds interesting and makes sense. I have made a mixture of silica and I think it was glaze and put two pieces together once. It worked but I must say, it bothered me having to do something to save the piece. I like my pieces to go into the kiln and come out the way I put um in. I pride myself on no breakage and running of glazes. But I guess when you are trying to give small classes, this is part of it. I will let the group know how my pieces turn out. I have fired overnight and the kiln should be ready to crack this afternoon. I will know if the braid held or not with the paper clay and magic water. If not, we go to all of these wonderful suggestions and I figure something out. Will keep you posted.

Nelly

#19 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 20 July 2012 - 05:58 PM

If I had to repair an already bisqued piece with magic-water/paper-clay would I need to bisque fire the repaired piece or just glaze fire after the repair has dried?


Yes re bisque before glazing.
Marcia

#20 Nelly

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Posted 20 July 2012 - 07:04 PM

Dear All,

I have just unloaded the kiln. The braid did stay attached with the layers of paper clay and magic water. All looks well except a crack developed where I never expected it to on this piece. Perhaps, like someone said on this forum, the crack was there when it went into the kiln and I just didn't see it?? All and all, I am quite pleased at the result. I will, however, be cautious in handling this piece until after it is 100% glazed and fired for good. ;) Thank you for all the great advice one and all. Even the thin pieces as directed (i.e., bed of sand and tile) turned out well. Great advice. Nelly




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