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      Moderators needed!   12/08/2017

      Ceramic Arts Network is looking for two new forum moderators for the Clay and Glaze Chemistry and Equipment Use and Repair sections of the Ceramic Arts Network Community Forum. We are looking for somebody who is an active participant (i.e. somebody who participates on a daily basis, or near daily) on the forum. Moderators must be willing to monitor the forum on a daily basis to remove spam, make sure members are adhering to the Forum Terms of Use, and make sure posts are in the appropriate categories. In addition to moderating their primary sections, Moderators must work as a team with other moderators to monitor the areas of the forum that do not have dedicated moderators (Educational Approaches and Resources, Aesthetic Approaches and Philosophy, etc.). Moderators must have a solid understanding of the area of the forum they are going to moderate (i.e. the Clay and Glaze Chemistry moderator must be somebody who mixes, tests, and has a decent understanding of materials). Moderators must be diplomatic communicators, be receptive to others’ ideas, and be able to see things from multiple perspectives. This is a volunteer position that comes with an honorary annual ICAN Gold membership. If you are interested, please send an email outlining your experience and qualifications to jharnetty@ceramics.org.
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Tyler Miller

Source Material on Cobalt and Copper Leaching in glazed wares

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On 9/15/2017 at 9:50 PM, Tyler Miller said:

@neilestrick

After rereading your comments, I agree with you.  Sometimes it's easy to fall into a mode of interpreting things, esp in as rarified a means of communication as an internet forum.  Sorry about that, I will do better in the future.  Also sorry for taking so long to respond, I've been in the sticks for 8 days and my cell signal was rough--tried to log in twice to respond to you, but northern Ontario's cell towers weren't having it.

I have a friend, who used to live in Northern Maine.  We would always joke that his phone and internet signals, were bounced off of moose antlers.  So if the signal was poor, one of the moose was out of place...

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After reading through this several times, I think I need to redesign my studio with a sprinkler system and automated squeegees, covered bins with not indents, stainless surfaces everywhere, a separate kiln room, maybe in the back 40, and a humongous dust collection system that dumps into a concrete lined land fill. Hmmmmm now to find the appropriate lottery to win.

 

best,

Pres

BlackDogPottery likes this

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A move to the tropics would suit me fine, as would a very large studio with attached small living space. These old bones are getting cold already, and a southern clime would be welcome. None of this is to be, as I am married to a wonderful woman who is happy with our home, and would not move to warmer weather for anything. . . fine to visit, not to live.

 

Oh well, we all have our compromises. Won't worry much until Spring, as the weather is already freezing the clay out under the kayaks.

 

 

best,

Pres

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No freeze here but 6 inches of rain so far this late fall. I love visiting the tropics myself (plan on being there for a month this winter myself) but I really like where we live as does my wife. The spring summer and falls. Now getting out of part of the winter is a  plan the old bones really appreciate . Missing a few feet of rain never hurt anyone.

I will make a few pots as well in my tropic plan at least for a non profit.

Back on topic I plan on leaching some of those built up toxins out of my body by swimming in warmr tropic water -its also good for the bones .

Edited by Mark C.

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On 11/13/2017 at 1:00 AM, BlackDogPottery said:

Would just like to mention that I believe the toxicity of iron oxide in glazes is a fraction compared to it's use in multiple cosmetics. Lipstick, eyeshadows, blushes, and whatever else are applied directly to the skin, digested, or inhaled. You get the point, very rarely do you ever hear reports on that as it would most likely be linked to lung issues than an overdose.

 

Also wonder about the effects of gold and other luster. There's plenty of dishes with rims lined in gold or silver. I'm sure if there's any way of it coming off it must be extremely minute, but it's something to think about.

Good point about the makeup. 

Gold does come off of rims and other surfaces. In the microwave, of course, we've been warned about it flashing and sparking on areas that are not covered by food. I had a gold lustre-lined cup that was microwaved and the gold became crazed-looking where exposed. Also, enthusiastic scrubbing will wear it down, so teeth on a rim might as well. Commercially gilded porcelain dinnerware seems to be a bit more resistant to wear, but owners are still well advised to hand wash to avoid harsh cleaners and scrubbing. This is all in aid of preserving appearance with no reference to the safety of consuming gold particulates. 

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Gold’s pretty inert stuff.  The chems used to suspend the gold for application are pretty horrific, and the gasses they release during firing are bad, but the gold itself is harmless.  There’s nothing in the body to interact with the gold.  Passes straight through you.  Luxury foods are regularly gilded.

Silver isn’t harmless, but it’s pretty low on the toxicity level.  In high enough doses for long enough, you’ll turn silver yourself, a condition called argyria.  Link:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Argyria

Edit:  I shoukd say, the compounds used to make “silver” the colour are not always so safe.  Bismuth, manganese, etc.—esp in raku.

Edited by Tyler Miller

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gold used in fillings not pure, some googler will fill you with the other metal which is much harder than gold.

silver filling ,amalgum containing mercury for one, again a googler will put it up here.

one point in time people were getting those fillings ripped out but research showed the toxins released in process worse than or faster than leaving in place.

so total burden is the issue as always

Edited by Babs

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