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Hulk

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  1. Like
    Hulk reacted to oldlady in What’s on your workbench?   
    denice, i bet you could get your husband to turn that wheel if you promise to make him something wonderful for dinner when you are completely healed.
  2. Like
    Hulk reacted to liambesaw in What’s on your workbench?   
    I spent all weekend doing something I haven't done for 20 years!  Making molds.
    3 piece mold, plaster is curing and hopefully ends up working out.
     

  3. Like
    Hulk reacted to Denice in What’s on your workbench?   
    I am going to try throwing again today,  I tried a couple of days ago and it did not go well.   My hand doctor told me it could be a couple of months before I get completely healed.   I  hope my hand will cooperate today if it doesn't I think I will start coiling again.   Tried using my slab roller and couldn't turn the wheel with my right hand had to use my left hand and arm.  Wish me luck!  Denice
  4. Like
    Hulk reacted to Min in What’s on your workbench?   
    It's been quiet on this workbench thread so I thought I'ld show my mussels.  
    ^10 porcelain, heading for a soda firing if they make it through drying without cracking.

  5. Like
    Hulk reacted to CactusPots in Hump molds   
    The second rule of extreme DIY (according to me) is priority must be given to material on hand.  Turns out I didn't have sufficient plywood for my first idea.  The foam will get a look another time, but here's my strengths.  First I have a pugmill, so I can get really soft clay.  Much easier for this kind of thing.  Second is the material for the rib.  Back in the 90s, I was installing telephone systems.  The main controllers where the size of large refrigerators and the control cards where a full 12"x12".  Every slot that was vacant had a filler card in the slot.  The material was like a circuit board with nothing on it.  It was 2 layers of something like fiberglass with a woven metal core.  Cut on a band saw, there are sparks.  Anyway it's super thin, light as stronger than anything I've seen.  It's no thicker than really thin cardboard and unbreakable and unbendable.  I can use it for extruder dies.  First rule of extreme DIY, never throw anything away.
    I'll give it a shell of hydrocal tomorrow and then pour plaster.
     

  6. Like
    Hulk reacted to oldlady in using out of date pills in glaze   
    as odd an experiment as you can think of, it has already been done.   never worry that you will be considered strange here, we all are.
  7. Like
    Hulk reacted to NancyE in using out of date pills in glaze   
    Thanks to everyone for your quick response.  I appreciate the friendly and knowledgeable advice.  I forgot to tell you that I use an electric kiln and usually glaze fire to cone 6.  Since I recently had to replace all my elements after a kiln mishap while firing local fossils (I made lava), I'm concerned about any off gassing that would coat the new elements.  After looking at the post about the pennies fired in clear glaze, I might start by dropping a whole tablet in the bottom of a cup.  I recently bought an old kiln for a hundred dollars that I might dedicate to experiments when I get it going.  Some interesting  things are happening when I fire local clay and stone.  I will gladly post photos if anyone is interested in them.  Again thanks,
    Nancy
  8. Like
    Hulk got a reaction from PeppernPatches in What Should I Sit My Kiln On?   
    Hi PP, hope you like your 1027! I've been running my bought used thirty two year old model in the garage with a home built downdraft system for a year and a half now.
    Be sure to leave a way for make up air to enter that small room. Your Envirovent will be moving a lot of air from the room. If the 1027 doesn't have holes in lid, there's that, however, might not need to drill any if there's sufficient gaps between the top section and lid, and between top section and middle section. A butane lighter flame makes a good tell-tale for air movement, or a smoke punk - to check where air is being sucked in. Likely the air flow will differ when the kiln is at temperature, vs. at ambient.
  9. Like
    Hulk reacted to Callie Beller Diesel in A trend observed   
    I do this full time, and do not doubt it folks, it most certainly IS an obligation. As a professional, I have effectively made promises that I will make work for people who want my skills. I have made commitments with my community to share my knowledge. I am obliged to myself, to my family and to my customers to be a responsible business owner and show up and produce and market and sell and photograph and do paperwork wether I feel like it or not. As a professional, I have made promises, and I am indeed obliged to keep them, and I have to follow through. I liked working in clay enough to choose it on purpose, so now I have a responsibility to do the work.
    That is NOT to say that I don't enjoy the obligation most of the time. My job is a very fun one! But it is still a job. I am not always calculating how and when to get to the studio any more than someone else calculates how soon they can get to their day job. There are days where I'm physically exhausted. There are days when I need a break. There are days where I experinece all kinds of self doubt, question my life decisions, get frustrated with the slow pace and I don't want to trim those bowls today because it's sunny and I'd rather be gardening. Sometimes it's frightening being the only person responsible for absoloutely everything, and please dear god let me not screw up anything involving RevCan. Some days are lonely. And all that is before any of the usual ways clay itself can go sideways.
    But there are also days where I get to see people's eyes light up and smile at the sight of a thing I made. There are days where I get to exercise my skills and feel very powerful in that. There are days that I get to help a husband pick out a 20th anniversary gift for his wife that he is still head over heels for. There are days where I find out I've created something that really resonates with someone else, and that is a VERY profound connection with another human being. Some days I get to help a new clay person solve a problem and watch them get excited. Those are all good days. I am very happy that I get lots of those days!
    I think if you haven't had a serious, debilitating case of the I don't wanna's or some kind of an artist block and had to work through it, give it time. It will happen. Cut yourself some slack when it does: it means you've hit milestones, and you likely have some growth iminent if you let it happen. Show yourself some love, because yelling at yourself and calling yourself names won't help. I've worked with clay for 26 years, so more of my life than not. It isn't fun all the time. My personal expereince is that at least part of the difference between a side gig or a hobby and being a professional is knowing how to recover from hitting those walls. Learning how to clearly and realistically define what you are and aren't able to do, doing it, and communicating it clearly to others.
     
  10. Like
    Hulk reacted to Marcia Selsor in A trend observed   
    Mark,
    I haven't had anymore problems with my wrists except from breaking a bone when I tripped over someone's legs sticking out of the wood kiln taking photos. That was 2 years ago. I think lifting kiln shelves and loading so many kilns per week affected the pain developed in back, shoulders, hips, and thighs.I feel the same about sometimes it keeps me fit and sometimes it is killing me. Gave up bricking up doors 40 years ago. I'm 71 now. Enjoying throwing big pots "effortlessly" with 50+ years of skill to do it. I like not struggling with the clay although if I push one too far and it starts to clapse, I'll hang it upside down and let it reshape itself and continue to throw when it is ready. No fear there and maybe no fear anywhere when you've explored so much and keep pushing the envelope. That makes me feel like it is keeping me fit. At the moment  I am working on a batch pots  for sagger firing soluble salts and at the same time engaged in carving porcelain for a celedon glaze just because I want to do it. Got a request from a friend from CAD for advice and critique of her work. Discussed glazes, slips, forms and firing schedules. I enjoyed sharing what I could.She'll let me know if it helped.
     Working with the Community (pop. 2200) efforts on a STEM program turned to STE-A(for the arts)M and developing programs for artists to communicate how they incorporate STEM in producing their work. I feel potters are really involved with that. I work in the studio every day. Maybe because I feel there aren't that any days left or maybe because I am slowing down. My husband will be home for good Sept. 1 when he retires. We want to hang out together stay home since we both have travelled a lot. He wants to play music and write books , and I can hang out with him but still work in clay. We got almost 6 ft. ( 5'10") of snow in Feb. but love living here. Really happy to be back in Montana. 
    This is from a friend of mine from college who taught me to throw. She was the director of Pilchuck for 10 years. She has a hobby after retirement: scuba diving. She  was the first woman President of NCECA, among many other things.  Good video from the Seattle Art Community. 
     
    There is room for everyone to enjoy their passion for clay.
     
    Marcia
     
     
  11. Like
    Hulk reacted to CruikshankN in Peep holes   
  12. Like
    Hulk reacted to oldlady in Peep holes   
    thanks for letting us know that you will not use stilts.  yes, this forum is a really good source of information.   i do not remember ever seeing a post that advised stilting everything.    nor do i think i have ever seen anything about making stilts and i read a lot of pottery books.   can you post a photo of the stilts your friend lent you if he made them?  
    when your firing is finished, please let us look at the results.  it is so encouraging to know what happens when we give advice instead of wondering if it just wound up in the blue.
  13. Like
    Hulk reacted to Callie Beller Diesel in Peep holes   
    Some cone six clays will warp (porcelains, some red or dark bodies with high flux levels), so that’s another reason not to stilt your wares at this temperature. 
  14. Like
    Hulk reacted to dhPotter in Peep holes   
    The wax on the bottoms of pots is to allow for easy clean up of the bottoms after dipping or spraying glazes. If you have left the bottom 1/4 inch of the pot glaze free this is good to go. For those pots where you don't have about 1/4 inch unglazed area, you can use a damp sponge and wipe away the glaze. Give the stilts back to your friend, you do not need them.
  15. Like
    Hulk got a reaction from Denice in QotW: When something breaks down, how do you deal with it?   
    Handy folks up thar ^!
    Tinkerin', design, fabrication, repair, maintenance, building, allat runs in the family, somewhat. Our folks provided examples and supported our curiosity as well. Pop should have known not to bother assembling our new bikes for xmas (oh dear, that was 'bout '65 or so); first, err, second thing I did was tear it down to to axles and crank, clean all, then re-assemble with proper (pasty white lithium may be ok for you pal) lubrications, tensions, torque, and all, ahem. The cables and their housings were all wrong, the wheels weren't true, and the brake blocks were backward.
    When breakdowns occur, typically looking to effect repairs - even if "it ain' worth it" - mostly ...at least determine causation. Where an improvement can be made, so much the better.  
    Still, there are those cases where we don't have proper tools and/or inclination (e.g. our new "hot tub" ...err, septic tank and leach field). Some work gets farmed out, likely that's true for just about everyone.
     
  16. Like
    Hulk reacted to oldlady in Peep holes   
    stilts are usually not put under cone 6 work.   they are intended for use with low fire, cone 06 work so the potter can put glaze on the bottom and hold the work above the kiln shelf.   
    hope you do not find them melted into the bottom of your work.
    if your glazes do not run and the footring is high enough, why stilt at all?
  17. Like
    Hulk reacted to CruikshankN in Peep holes   
    I have a window right next to my kiln that I have a box fan in to draw the air through the garage.  I am thinking this will do the same thing to draw the fumes out and the fresh air from the garage being open in. 
  18. Like
    Hulk reacted to Mark C. in Peep holes   
    Crack your garage door open a foot and put a fan next to the opening and stay out of there while the wax burns off.No need for a hose and do not blow air around kiln with a fan.
    Just get some air moving out of garage under door -makeup air will find a way back in and keep it fresher .
  19. Like
    Hulk got a reaction from liambesaw in Peep holes   
    Forum regulars and moderators may well wade in here by end of day...
    I fire in the garage as well, and although my somewhat ancient kiln is fitted with both downdraft and hood vent, there's still some fumes; wax resist burn off seems the best indicator. I'm leaving the big rollup door open throughout. We have two person doors between the studio/garage and living space; I pin the first one and side door to the outside open when the onshore is blowing - hence air moves toward the kiln side.
    Any road, my suggestion would be to leave door(s) to living space closed, the big door open, and yourself well away from the plume of kiln fumes!
  20. Like
    Hulk got a reaction from CruikshankN in Peep holes   
    Forum regulars and moderators may well wade in here by end of day...
    I fire in the garage as well, and although my somewhat ancient kiln is fitted with both downdraft and hood vent, there's still some fumes; wax resist burn off seems the best indicator. I'm leaving the big rollup door open throughout. We have two person doors between the studio/garage and living space; I pin the first one and side door to the outside open when the onshore is blowing - hence air moves toward the kiln side.
    Any road, my suggestion would be to leave door(s) to living space closed, the big door open, and yourself well away from the plume of kiln fumes!
  21. Like
    Hulk reacted to CruikshankN in Peep holes   
    Thanks so much! Unfortunately the kiln is in my garage and I'm not sure I will keep everything out of my house. I am willing to get creative and put a  fan in front of the vent with some dryer hose and force the fumes out the window. Do you have any suggestions? I am wide open any help you can provide
    Thanks Again
  22. Like
    Hulk got a reaction from Pres in QotW: When something breaks down, how do you deal with it?   
    Handy folks up thar ^!
    Tinkerin', design, fabrication, repair, maintenance, building, allat runs in the family, somewhat. Our folks provided examples and supported our curiosity as well. Pop should have known not to bother assembling our new bikes for xmas (oh dear, that was 'bout '65 or so); first, err, second thing I did was tear it down to to axles and crank, clean all, then re-assemble with proper (pasty white lithium may be ok for you pal) lubrications, tensions, torque, and all, ahem. The cables and their housings were all wrong, the wheels weren't true, and the brake blocks were backward.
    When breakdowns occur, typically looking to effect repairs - even if "it ain' worth it" - mostly ...at least determine causation. Where an improvement can be made, so much the better.  
    Still, there are those cases where we don't have proper tools and/or inclination (e.g. our new "hot tub" ...err, septic tank and leach field). Some work gets farmed out, likely that's true for just about everyone.
     
  23. Like
    Hulk got a reaction from OlgaBiff in Buying my first kiln   
    Hi Olga!
    Here's links:
    https://www.rohde-online.net/en/arts-and-crafts/products/toploaders/ecotop-series/ecotop-60
    https://www.nabertherm.com/produkte/details/en/artscrafts_toplader_toplader
    The Nabertherm is bigger?
  24. Like
    Hulk got a reaction from Callie Beller Diesel in Turned Foot Rings On Mugs; Elegance Or Affectation?   
    Still can't tap center, also have trouble running a paint brush with my right hand (within a particular range), throwing overhand, an' several other right hand skills due to minor nerve damage, oh well - one must adapt.
    Foot ring can be elegant, sure, affected, aye - perhaps there are (even) more extreme views - I'll go with design choice for now. I like: the natural break - for shape and glaze, easy to burnish and polish table contact, minimal unglazed surface, and finger catch, for bowls especially (all them features have been mentioned above).
    Take care Paul!
    ...I still miss Yappy, hope she's ok.
     
  25. Like
    Hulk reacted to Viki in plaster wedging table repair   
    Several years ago I did put ¾ inch of new plaster on top of a very old 3 inch thick plaster wedging board.  It worked well until recently, when pieces started flaking off.  As I repaired the table again, I discovered my mistake from those years ago.
    Back then, the ‘first’ pour of plaster was not sufficient to fill the space.  Within a half hour, I mixed up another batch and finished the pour, overlapping and levelling the surface.  So, the problem was that the two pours did not make for one working surface.  Through normal use, the overlap areas weakened and flaked.
    Surprising to me, I was able to lift the entire ¾ topper in one piece. It did not adhere to the old plaster.  It is still very strong.  I’m going to cut it and use it for bats.
    A few days ago, I cleaned the old surface once again, and poured a single pour of new plaster.  Letting harden for several days before using.  I’m optimistic it will last for a longer time than the last time.
    Thanks for your thoughts. 
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