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Benzine

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  1. Like
    Benzine reacted to Min in Slip painting on terra Sig is smudging after cone 04 bisque   
    You could try a black underglaze on top of the terra sig. 
  2. Like
    Benzine reacted to liambesaw in Slip painting on terra Sig is smudging after cone 04 bisque   
    So the black slip is actually more of a stain than a slip since it only contains a very very tiny amount of clay in the crocus martis.  I really don't know if there's much to do about it moving or smudging, in can't really tell that there's any obvious smudging in the pictures.  
    In fact that piece looks really beautiful
    You may just need to wash the unfluxed stain off of the pot, I bet it will still be quite black.
    Either that or you can use something with more gerstley that will melt onto the clay body more readily, or paint it on under the terra sig before it's burnished.  
    By the way, that black stain recipe is super high concentration, you could probably have black stain for the rest of your life using that quite dilute
     
  3. Like
    Benzine got a reaction from CruikshankN in How To Build A Hand Warmer Mug   
    Does anyone have any experience or tips, for how to create a "hand warmer" style of mug?
     
    For those unfamiliar with the term, here is what they look like:
     
    http://clayinmotion.com/catalog/category_images/handwarmer.jpg
     
    I've never made one, but had a student ask me how to do so.  So, I said I'd look into it, and try to figure something out.
     
    My first instinct, is to just throw the body, then cut out a portion of the wall, for the hand slot.  Then form a thin slab on the inside to fill in the space, score/ slip it in place, and smooth together.
     
    Is that about the gist of it, or is there a better/ easier way?
     
    Edit:  I noticed, that there is a part of the wall that bows out too.  So it's not so much cutting a part of the wall out, as it is making a slice, pushing part out, part in, and then using a slab to make the interior slot?
  4. Like
    Benzine reacted to neilestrick in QotW: When something breaks down, how do you deal with it?   
    I rarely ever pay someone to fix things, especially in the studio. At home I will hire someone only if it's an extreme situation that's beyond my ability as an accomplished DIY'er, like if I need a new roof. I enjoy fixing things, though, so it's not a problem. You either need to be handy or need to be able to write a check.
  5. Like
    Benzine reacted to Mark C. in A trend observed   
    I almost hate to dip my finger in this discussion as a professional potter-but
    Many decades ago, long ago really for most ,when I was doing fairs /art shows whatever a lot-most of the artists and makers where doing it as a full time gig or profession. That was the 70's and into the 80's .In the late 80,s early 90s we saw a influx of retirees coming from a life long career of something else and entering the crafts world as a second gig in life. for fun pocket change.
    It hit me once back then talking to my neighbor doing a show in the Pacific Northwest . He said wow lots of customers in your booth whats the catch ( I think he made walking sticks or something that involved a hot glue gun?)I said that I had been making pots for a few decades  and had lots of return customers and he told me he just retired form Boeing and was doing this as fun in the summer thing. Thats when it really hit me and since then I have seen a huge influx of real part timers-now its a large proportion of many shows.Many of us old timers compare notes on this subject as well as current trends.
    Now its no longer mold slip- paint your own shops but hobby studios that popped up nation wide in the past 20 years replacing most slip shops. You pay and join and have fun. After a few years you enter the art show fair circuit .Its just another trend really.
    I'm thinking now that I'm in my 60s of retiring from a life with clay and getting a part time job with Boeing. 
    I can see it now while riveting a wing and my fellow worker says how long you been working here-I say I retired from being a clay artist/Potter and took this job as a summer fun thing.
    True story except my working at Boeing
  6. Like
    Benzine reacted to Min in A trend observed   
    Apparently "bro-ramics" is a thing. 
    https://news.artnet.com/art-world/ceramics-celebrity-trend-1770717
  7. Like
    Benzine reacted to GEP in Bowls Start round, become oval when fired   
    When you roll out your slab, make sure you are not stretching the clay in only one direction. If you do, that direction will rebound back more than the other direction. If you are using a slab roller, put the clay through in one direction making the slab twice as thick as you want it. Then rotate the slab 90 degrees and put it through the slab roller again to achieve the finished thickness. I see in your original comment that you say you are “compressing the clay in both directions,” but I’m hoping to spell out technique more specifically. 
    I make a lot of square plates. Before I figured this out, many of them would emerge from the kiln as rectangles. 
    As for your coiled pot coming out oval, are you working on a banding wheel, which will allow you to address the pot equally from all 360 degrees as you are building it? If you’re not using a banding wheel, this could also be affecting your slab pots. 
  8. Like
    Benzine got a reaction from JohnnyK in The Great pottery Throwdown is Back on YouTube   
    This Season, has been very enjoyable. 
    There are a couple very strong competitors, that I am fairly confident will make the finals.
    Like oldlady said, it is surprising that people don't try and make themselves more rounded, before appearing.
    There have been many times this Season, where a person will say, "I'm a thrower, I don't know how to sculpt." or "I'm a sculptor, I don't know how to throw".  They generally know, what they will be expected to do, so making yourself well rounded would be beneficial. 
      I don't know how long of a heads up they get before filming starts, but if I were on the show, I'd put a lot of time into practicing a wide range of techniques and forms. 
     
  9. Like
    Benzine got a reaction from vena in The Great pottery Throwdown is Back on YouTube   
    This Season, has been very enjoyable. 
    There are a couple very strong competitors, that I am fairly confident will make the finals.
    Like oldlady said, it is surprising that people don't try and make themselves more rounded, before appearing.
    There have been many times this Season, where a person will say, "I'm a thrower, I don't know how to sculpt." or "I'm a sculptor, I don't know how to throw".  They generally know, what they will be expected to do, so making yourself well rounded would be beneficial. 
      I don't know how long of a heads up they get before filming starts, but if I were on the show, I'd put a lot of time into practicing a wide range of techniques and forms. 
     
  10. Like
    Benzine reacted to Min in QotW: What do you make that is difficult, and takes time but is not viewed as difficult?   
    Not that they are really difficult but they do take more time than they look.  From last week (finally able to start throwing again after an injury).

     
    Absolutely!
     
  11. Like
    Benzine reacted to liambesaw in New year's rush?   
    Anyone else getting a lot of orders after the new year?  
    I'm so busy with orders my head is spinning!  I have open orders for tableware from 12 people in the last few weeks.  Mugs for teachers, tableware sets from coworkers, bowls from neighbors, people from Instagram of all places, I mean it's crazy!  I thought the holidays was busy, what's going on?  
    I'm thinking people are anticipating tax refunds or something?  Never had them line up before it's great!
  12. Like
    Benzine reacted to neilestrick in Covered jars   
    Depending on the type of pot and lid, you run the risk of either the pot or the lid warping slightly during the glaze firing if they are fired separately. If they fit well before firing, it will only take a tiny bit of movement to mess up the fit. There are ways of dealing with runny glazes via application, or you can choose a type of lid where it's not really an issue. The glaze combination on the pot below is incredibly fluid, but because only a small amount is on the underside of the lid, and it's not vertical there, it won't run into the jar. The other nice thing about this type of lid is that the unglazed portion doesn't show when the lid is on.
     
     
     


  13. Like
    Benzine reacted to Pres in Griffin Grip - I like it, but what a mess it makes!   
    As Ben mentioned in his post, I did use a large round plastic bowl cut in half to catch trimmings from the griffin grip. However, I few years ago we renovated the kitchen, and I repurposed one of the counter tops by adding sides to it and cutting a slot for the wheel shaft so that I could slide it on to the wheel with the regular splash pan off. Then I added pieces of wood on either side underneath so that they would grip the sides of the CXC holding this new trimming area in place. I also added a magnetic tool rack on the right inside. This way I can stand it up when not in use resting on on the open end at the end of the CXC acting as a table for my tool rack (silver ware drying/storage tray). Now I don't have to store the extra splash pan anywhere, and don't have piles of trimmings on the floor.
    As Ben said also, the GG is a great tool for assembly. I use it to trim and assemble chalice and patens. First trimming the thrown stems, using a rig I made up using plumbing parts, then I trim the chalice bowls and mix and match stems to bowls and assemble while on the wheel, using the wheel to compress the joins, carve an inset in the bowl to match the stem and smooth the join more with a metal or wooden rib.
    You can see much of this on my blog.
    best,
    Pres
  14. Like
    Benzine got a reaction from Pres in Old crunchy glaze   
    The great thing about glazes is, that like clay, until they are fired, they can continuously be reused/ recycled.
    I use a stick blender to mix slip and glazes, because you don't have to move the material you are mixing to a different container, which is handy.  
    If the glaze is still heavily settling to the bottom, it may need to be tweaked a bit, by adding some bentonite and/ or epsom salt, to help better suspend it.  
  15. Like
    Benzine got a reaction from Rae Reich in Old crunchy glaze   
    The great thing about glazes is, that like clay, until they are fired, they can continuously be reused/ recycled.
    I use a stick blender to mix slip and glazes, because you don't have to move the material you are mixing to a different container, which is handy.  
    If the glaze is still heavily settling to the bottom, it may need to be tweaked a bit, by adding some bentonite and/ or epsom salt, to help better suspend it.  
  16. Like
    Benzine got a reaction from Callie Beller Diesel in Wax resist/ water etching, and signatures   
    Yep, it's a requirement, when having students use resist, if I don't want to continually buy  new brushes.  This is doubly true, with latex resist!
  17. Like
    Benzine reacted to neilestrick in Old Shimpo (used) slow at 5lbs.   
    It could be that the drive wheel is slipping on the metal cone. That wheel is rubber, and can get hard over time and lose grip. It's also possible that something else is loose in there and slipping under the load. I'd first open it up and see if anything is obviously loose. I think @Pres had found a source for the drive wheels a while back.
  18. Like
    Benzine reacted to liambesaw in Old Shimpo (used) slow at 5lbs.   
    I have a 1962 version rk2 that works great
  19. Like
    Benzine reacted to neilestrick in Old Shimpo (used) slow at 5lbs.   
    There's no control board in it, just good solid parts. They don't run especially smooth or quiet compared to modern wheels, but they keep on truckin'.
  20. Like
    Benzine reacted to liambesaw in Clear Glaze on Bottom of piece   
    Not without stilting it.  Even then I don't suggest it.  You can order some progressively finer diamond disks from somewhere like Amazon and just polish the bottoms with those.  It makes a smooth shiny surface.
  21. Like
    Benzine reacted to JohnnyK in Raku second firing?   
    Thank you all for your input...I'll take each of your suggestions and put the vase through the ringer and see how it holds up, but first I'll give the outside a couple of coats of clear acrylic to protect it as I usually do.
  22. Like
    Benzine reacted to JohnnyK in Raku second firing?   
    Just received my first liter of Liquid Glaze and used it on the inside of one of my Horsehair Raku pots following the mfg instructions and it worked! The inside of the pot is definitely hydrophobic...Filled it with water and let it stand for 4 hours with no sign of seepage. I'll leave the water in the pot for a couple of days to see if there are any adverse reactions. If none, then I think I'll have a new line of watertight Raku pots that can be used as vases...Hot Damn!
  23. Like
    Benzine reacted to Min in Raku second firing?   
    They say as much on their own website, not even recommending using it on earthenware for functional work. " Note that if the surface you seal is not completely solid (lowfired/low bisque) the sealer will still fuse with the surface & be waterproof, but only for as long as the surface remains intact, therefore heavy scraping of cutlery on unstable bisque fired plates is not recommended. Earthernware clay bodies fired to their most vitrified temperatures (terracotta etc.) can be sealed with much success, but will remain more suceptible to chips & damage than high fired stoneware or porcelain, as the claybody itself is not suitable for restaurant quality plates, cracking easily & requiring gentle washing to prolong the life of the piece. This is the nature of the clay body, & cannot be changed by sealing the surface only. While your work will be waterproof & stain resistant, it will remain brittle & easily scratched if low fired".
  24. Like
    Benzine reacted to neilestrick in Raku second firing?   
    There are way too many warnings about what that product cannot do with low fire, porous surfaces. It specifically says that it cannot make a toxic glaze food safe. It says that prolonged contact with some foods may mar the surface. It says it will not make your clay body any more durable and less resistant to scratching, that it will still mark from cutlery and chip easily. If those were issues with a specific glaze we would not use it on functional work, especially plates. That product is simply a sealer, it should not be used in place of a good glaze, especially on plates. Raku should never be used for dishes, even with a sealer IMO. As soon as there's a scratch in the sealer, it's no longer sealed up. You're not only opening yourself up to an unhappy customer down the line after using the plates for a while, you're opening yourself up to liability.
     
  25. Like
    Benzine got a reaction from Rae Reich in Making glaze from your urine   
    THAT'S DISGUSTING!  Urine should not be used in glaze, but instead, just swished around in the mouth, as a teeth whitener like nature intended!
     
    Seriously though, my High School Art Teacher told us stories of he, or at least people he knew in College, who would urinate on their Raku pots, after pulling them out.  
    Did this actually happen?  Who knows?  Myy Teacher had stories for days, and at the very least, they were entertaining.
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