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Marcia Selsor    1,301

The question should be What IS your throwing position. Couldn't edit it. Sorry. I am building some new stools for my studio after studying Pietro's at La Meridiana. I will paint them tomorrow and add a cushion. The cool thing about these stools is a storage bin under the seat, adjustable height in the legs, AND if you reverse the lid , the angle is good for your back.

So my question of the week is: what are you sitting on when throwing? Got any clever tips for back aches?

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post-1954-0-84721500-1404180348_thumb.jpg

post-1954-0-24936300-1404343380_thumb.jpg

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Biglou13    202

http://www.appleboxes.net/images/applebox-full-size-LG.jpg

It's no corbousier, just looks like one.

Best position for me.

I've tried the $ 200 stool. And still love the full size Apple box. simple solution. I'm 6' it's perfect. I have a cushion for it but it makes seat to high. I'm no production potter so it doesn't matter.

 

I've had friends have custom one made for their height.

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Tyler Miller    331

An old kitchen chair that just happens to match the height of the wheel for me.  I've angled 45 degrees and sit on a corner.

 

I find throwing very hard on my rhomboids, due to my bad habit of rolling my shoulders forward.  I find doing back strengthening exercises helps a lot, and then stretching helps as well.  Thumbs up like Fonzi, elbows up in line with shoulders, thumbs down, and then draw them together like you're going to touch them behind your back.  Hold 5 seconds, repeated 10 times.  Every other day twice a day.

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Pres    896

I use the Speedball St-4. I had purchased a number of these for the HS where I taught years ago, and love throwing on them. the tilt in the seat is similar to the tilt in Marcia's home-built, and the height is adjustable to allow me to position myself even with my work so that I don't have to hunch.

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JBaymore    1,432

45 years of making pots now and only slight issues with lower back so far.  (And they have JUST crept in in the past year.)  For the past 10-15 years..... I've used (earlier version of) this:

 

http://www.sheffield-pottery.com/ST-1-PROFESSIONAL-POTTER-S-STOOL-p/cst1.htm

 

Forward pelvic tilt keeps the curve in the lower spine, as does breaking at the hips... not curling the back over into a "hunch".

 

Save your backs folks.

 

best,

 

.......................john

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CarlCravens    58

I have a Public Seating lab stool, much like what you see in pottery classes.  But I bought the adjustable leg kit and set the back legs longer than the front to give the seat a forward tilt.  I have bricks on the floor for my feet to bring the tops of my thighs just above the splash pan.  (If I don't have bricks, I find myself propping my legs up on my toes... when taking classes, I've noticed a *lot* of people do that.)

 

I only throw a few hours a week.  If I were a production potter, I'd have the CI/Speedball fancy stool.

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clay lover    133

The speedball in tempting, but spendy, $200.  I found a plastic  bath tub stool at the thrift store. It's like what is used in retirement living centers.  very stable feet, all 4 legs adjustable height, good wide seat, if I sit on the edge of a stool, I get numb down the backs of my legs. And a sore bum.

I have the front legs 2" shorter . with the overall seat height at about level with the wheel head.  Bricks for the non pedal foot. knees just above the splash pan, thighs level.  I scoot the chair as close to the splash pan as possible so that I can keep my upper arms close to my body, rather than reaching out into space to find the center of the clay.

 I have been using it for about 3 months and so far it is better than what I previously had.  the price, $5, was also comfortable. 

But I still think about the Speedball.

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JBaymore    1,432

The speedball in tempting, but spendy, $200. 

 

Try the cost of a chiropractor or back surgery.  ;)

 

best,

 

....................john

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CarlCravens    58

clay lover, that's why I have the lab stool on a tilt... I don't sit on the edge of it.  I pull it right up against the wheel (like you) and sit fully on the seat.  (I splurged and bought the "padded" lab stool.  It's not significant padding, and only on the center and not the rim, but it makes a difference.)

 

I can go from my stool to identical stools in a class and I can tell the difference with no tilt.  And I can tell the difference between Public Seating brand and cheaper brands... PS stools have a rounded edge that some of the others lack.

 

I've looked at standing, but I already have a spinal injury (a damaged disc) that can make it uncomfortable to stand for very long.

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Mark C.    1,800

Whatever you use think about your back in 40 years-I have used a stump- a steel tractor seat -wood chair-office chair- and now a super stool as in Johns post above.

You need forward slant for best posture.

If I knew now what I did not know then-

Big Lou just prop your box up with a 2x4 under rear

Take care of your back now- you will need it later on.

Mark

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JBaymore    1,432

Take care of your back now- you will need it later on.

 

Everyone seems to take the fact that their body works like a wonderful machine for granted....... until it doesn't. 

 

And for almost all of us..... at some point........ it won't anymore.

 

Usually it pops up when you least expect it.  And before you are ready for it.

 

Suddenly "the future" is right now.

 

best,

 

.....................john

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Pres    896

ST-4 is worth looking at as it does have the pelvic tilt, and is $100 less. :)

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Wyndham    98

2 cinder blocks and an old wore out quilt. For 20 years I stood to turn but after a hip replacement , I sit & turn but not as much as I used to turn, too many miles on the bod.

Wyndham

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

I will get Chris in this discussion when I show my color pallet for my 2 new benches.Got some oil cloth in a hardware store in Florence.Matched it with some paint from Home Depot. Our bodies are an important part of the creative process in clay. Some of you may be young now, but time marches on. I had bilateral carpal tunnel surgery when my wrists reached the point I couldn't lift a glass of water. I think it was due to lifting 1600 pounds of hard bricks in 2 kiln doors 4 x's week. I built hinged doors and a car kiln asap when we moved to a new building. Take care of your body. For those who think they can work without planning this aspect of the trade, think again. Whether you buy a $200 stool or use a crate with a slant from a 2x4, do it for your future.

It takes a long time to become a respected master potter. Take care of your body so you'll get there in one piece.Great discussion.

Marcia

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Babs    386

I use a stool, rec. top which I've spun around so I sit at a corner, I have two old bats, not including me, which I place under the rear legs, stool not mine, then I place my feet on a couple of dried out bags of clay to raise them to a comfortable height. Sitting bones just higher than the wheelhead.

I get up and do things between batches of throwing. used to lose the feeling down the front of my left leg prior to blocking and tilting.

Marcia I am sure that what ever I needed would be in that storage bin just after I was sitted comfortably, nice to see you get away from battleship grey! :D

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

For Babs and Chris, as woman to woman understand fabric and decor. I am in need of a morale boost in my studio.The salts and acids have to be overcome.Fell in love with this oil cloth at a hardware store and it inspired me t build these stool. I have told Pietro he should sell these stools. maybe he should just sell the design

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post-1954-0-80878300-1404266457_thumb.jpg

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Babs    386

What a lady! back in the country a couple of days and there you are pumping out furniture! Well done.

Great cloth, you'll be pioneer quilting next, with clay of course.

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Benzine    610

Contrary to what my profile pic shows, I do not throw while sitting on a couch.... It's actually a love seat...

 

Currently, I use an old computer desk chair, that I've had since college.  It has a padded seat, but I've worn a pretty good "butt groove" in it.  The chair swivels and is on wheels.  It also has a height adjustment.  At its lowest position its a good height for my wheel, raised up it's a good height for using my work bench.

 

Throwing like this hasn't bothered me yet, and no hints that it will.  But like several of you have stated, injuries come out of nowhere.  My upper back/ neck is bothering me, and I have zero idea why.  I might actually have to break down and see a chiropractor.  I've never been to one.

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JBaymore    1,432

  My upper back/ neck is bothering me, and I have zero idea why.  I might actually have to break down and see a chiropractor.  I've never been to one.

 

If that avatar picture is any indication of a normal "home position" you tend to fall into.... I can tell why you are developing issues in the neck and shoulders.  And you'll be getting back problems eventually also.

 

I teach ergonomics related to throwing in my basic throwing classes.  I realize is is a still shot and one moment in time....... but you do not appear to be using your body effectively there in that shot. 

 

best,

 

......................john

 

PS:  And I can guarantee you that to attempt to "fix" that situation.... for a long while you are going to swear that what is being said to do for changes is crazy, and it will move your thowing backward.  Yup.. it will... for a while.

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Benzine    610

John,

 

I wouldn't say that photo is an indication of the way I throw.  I threw one thing on the wheel, using that seat, for the sake of the photo.  

 

There are probably a lot of things contributing to my back hurting, carrying a child, my workout routine, having classroom tables at a height that makes me bend over waaay too much, etc.

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CarlCravens    58

Everyone seems to take the fact that their body works like a wonderful machine for granted....... until it doesn't.

The thing with backs is that, in my personal experience, you don't ever expect to cause permanent injury.  I was just trying to plug in a cable in a server rack that I couldn't quite reach... I stretched and twisted, and the pop in my back didn't seem like a big deal.  Turned out I'd damaged a disc and it's an injury that has plagued me off and on for years.  I can't stand or walk for very long without minor pain.

 

Only permanent thing to do be done for it is back surgery (probably fusing the vertebrae), and my doctor assures me that back surgery will be worse than anything I've experienced so far.  (Which includes picking up a napkin off the floor of a hotel and finding myself flat on the floor, unable to stand.)

 

Backs don't heal readily, and permanent damage is certainly a possibility.  It doesn't help that my career has me sitting on my hind end all day.

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Benzine    610

 

Everyone seems to take the fact that their body works like a wonderful machine for granted....... until it doesn't.

The thing with backs is that, in my personal experience, you don't ever expect to cause permanent injury. 

 

No doubt there.  I've hurt my neck, just turning my head funny.  It was nothing serious, or permanent, but still...

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Pres    896

Careful there Ben, I hurt my neck last year while doing pull ups. Herniated a disc. Lots of therapy to bring it back. Only felt like a sore neck in the beginning, but then had numbness on the left arm and hand so went to see doc. Yep, everyone needs to be careful as injuries come when you least expect.

 

Best,

Pres

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

Got my new stools finished. Here they are. I plan to enjoy good posture using the seat in the slanted position.It replaces an old chair. And it takes a smaller footprint.I am getting an urge to repaint my wedging table...but it will pass.

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post-1954-0-22077600-1404342700_thumb.jpg

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Babs    386

My dull geen chipped and clay bespattered stool is looking not so fine! Lucky my eyes are positoned where they are.

Stunned Marcia, are they replacing that chair? Painting is a bit like dyeing fabric, bit of dye left in the pot, look out any garments in teh  vicinity!

You'll have to do the whole studio, your other colours are soooooo last year.

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