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Applying A Liner Glaze.


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#1 Babs

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Posted 12 February 2014 - 11:22 PM

How are you guys applying liner glazes? I have been taking them over the edge but am not happy how they look when overlapped by the outside glaze. Some are OK but some can't handle the extra thickness and can crawl or just look "crusty" , a non ceramic term there.



#2 levoslashx

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Posted 13 February 2014 - 12:55 AM

If you're so inclined, after you apply the liner glaze, clean up drips and such with a sponge so you have a nice clean line around the rim.  Then apply wax resist close to, but definitely not over,  the edge of that glaze and down inside the mug a bit.  Then dip top down into you're next glaze.  It gives a nice delineation between the liner and outside glaze.  It takes a bit longer this way, and you have to wait for the wax resist to dry, but it looks nice.

 

-Levi



#3 neilestrick

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Posted 13 February 2014 - 12:54 PM

Ditto above. Another thing you can try is to do something in the form to define the top of the pot, maybe an inch down from the top- the part your lips will touch on a mug, for example- so you have a natural spot for the liner glaze to stop. A thickened lip will work, too. Then pour the inside with your liner glaze and dip the defined lip. Then dip the body of the mug up to that point. If you're careful, the two glazes will just touch, with very little overlap. Or bring the liner glaze down further and dip the second color over it, giving you a runny overlap area, as shown in the attached photo of a pitcher I did a long time ago.

 

Attached File  Pitcher.jpg   299.2KB   11 downloads


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#4 Colby Charpentier

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Posted 13 February 2014 - 12:55 PM

Glaze application is defintely form specfic, but with low production numbers, any number of solutions are workable. Levi's wax resist is fine, however, I find wax to be annoying and difficult to use. Not to mention, my brushes hate it. I am a strong proponent of applying and then cleaning your glaze line by wiping with a sponge. A well thought out rim or transition line whereever the glaze will meet allows for a crisp glaze line. The liner glaze tends to be specific to situations where the outer glaze solution, whether it be vapor glazing or otherwise, will not be as pleasant on the inside of the form. If you're using an outer glaze that you're not using on the inside of the form because its a poorly formed glass or has way too much colorant in it, just be aware of fuming... Otherwise, good luck!

 

edit: errr Neil beat me by a minute :P



#5 Chilly

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Posted 13 February 2014 - 12:58 PM

Hey Patrick, why don't you introduce yourself. tell us where you're from, what you do..........


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#6 Chantay

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Posted 13 February 2014 - 04:29 PM

Niel,  you have some of the nicest glaze work I have ever seen.  Have you updated your website lately?  Last time I checked it had been awhile since you had updated it.


- chantay

#7 emptynester

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Posted 13 February 2014 - 04:35 PM

I have used painters tape around the outside of a bowl or mug to contain the inside glaze, then dipped up to the rim in another glaze. Sometimes I dip just the rim in a third glaze.

#8 neilestrick

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Posted 13 February 2014 - 04:45 PM

Niel,  you have some of the nicest glaze work I have ever seen.  Have you updated your website lately?  Last time I checked it had been awhile since you had updated it.

 

Thanks, Chantay. Not lately. I'm just swamped with other work that has to get done. The web site is always last.


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#9 Babs

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Posted 13 February 2014 - 05:08 PM

 

Niel,  you have some of the nicest glaze work I have ever seen.  Have you updated your website lately?  Last time I checked it had been awhile since you had updated it.

 

Thanks, Chantay. Not lately. I'm just swamped with other work that has to get done. The web site is always last.

 

Great advice and delightful work. Glad you make time!

Thanks for all of the above, I'll work on these



#10 Mark C.

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Posted 14 February 2014 - 02:15 AM

I use a glaze jet to squirt my liner glazes in while the form is upside down-then the glaze is just clean on top lip

This jet drops into a 5 gallon bucket and I explained how to make one in words and photos in Studio potter volume 36 #2 pages 54 & 55. I have always helped to support Studio Potter since it started way back. Now its a bit gone astray of the orginal course but always a good read.

I do not think its online but single issues are available

 

I also posted a photo on this site some time ago-its really a production potter tool.

You can do almost the same by pouring the forms and dumping them with a spin its just a lot slower. I have found the plastic funnel pitcher works wonders for most as for filling interiors

The larger of the two is best-it also an great tool to apply glaze to certain areas not others-glazing is one of the things I like the best so any tool that helps I'm all in.

http://www.amazon.co...2?ie=UTF8&psc=1

 

I use a wet sponge to clean any drips or make a straight line-wax is to slow-if you do use way apply with a wet sponge for faster better control than a brush.

Mark


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#11 Chilly

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Posted 14 February 2014 - 05:53 AM

I like the look of the funnel pitcher, but it doesn't get good reviews when pouring batter.  :(  Note to self:  glaze mus be thinner than batter !!


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#12 Kristin_Gail

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Posted 20 February 2014 - 01:26 PM

I am absolutely horrid at the pour in/pour out while twisting method. But it was no biggie - I'd just wipe off my spills before glazing the exterior. Now that I realize I have to apply the exterior slip (for soda kiln) before the interior liner glaze, I'm in the market for a new method, as well.

We are, at this very second, working on a solution - based on a submersible pond pump. Will let you know if it works!

#13 Kristin_Gail

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Posted 20 February 2014 - 01:36 PM

I don't know if something like this would satisfy your needs, but it might come in handy for someone else who finds this thread. It works with water, inside the house. Now we'll try it for real.

This is just a submersible pump with Pexpipe (whatever the hell that is) and a quarter-turn or ball valve on the end. All found items in our basement. We are hoarders, hear us roar.

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